Columbia Announces New Outdoor Dream Job

first_imgAre you looking for a new gig? Sure, you could go the traditional route—maybe find a nice office job with a short commute—or you could apply for a fully paid six-month adventure to test gear around the world.It sounds too good to be true, but that’s exactly the position that Columbia Sportswear is now hiring for.Aptly named ‘The Director of Toughness’, this esteemed post will require selected candidates to travel the world on Columbia’s dime, testing gear in some of the world’s most iconic wild places.Among other skill sets, qualified candidates (two of whom will ultimately be hired) are expected to posses a proficiency in skiing or snowboarding, trail navigation of varying degrees, and Instagram-worthy photography skills.The new ‘Directors of Toughness’ will also need to be media savvy and comfortable in front of a camera, because they’ll become brand ambassadors of sorts for the iconic outdoor company, appearing on TV shows like Jimmy Kimmel Live throughout the course of the six month gig.According to the job post, Columbia plans to pay the new employees $26k for the dream job and put them up in the outdoor hub of Portland, Oregon—when they’re not traveling the world testing the latest and greatest Columbia gear of course.Think you’re up to the challenge? Apply here now!last_img read more

Outdoor Updates: NOAA predicting widespread coral bleaching in Hawaii

first_imgThe “lungs of the earth” are burning. More than 74,000 fires have ignited so far this year in Brazil, half of them in the Amazon rainforest—marking an 80 percent increase in fires recorded over the same time period last year in the country. The fires are blamed on deforestation and a practice called slash-and-burn, which clears the forest for agricultural practices. Newly elected Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro ran on a platform of opening up the forest for increased development and has gutted many of Brazil’s environmental regulatory agencies. As the fires raged, Bolsonaro claimed they were a conspiracy to attack the government. For daily news updates, join our News Group on Facebook Here On August 9, Harold Thompson, 58, of Knoxville, Tennessee experienced cardiac arrest while hiking along the Injun Creek manway in the Tennessee side of the park. Thompson’s brother and park medics administered CPR, but he was also pronounced dead at the scene. There have been 11 deaths in Great Smoky Mountains National Park this year.  NOAA predicting widespread coral bleaching in Hawaii Two deaths from cardiac arrest in Great Smoky Mountains National Park  In recent days, thousands of Brazilians have taken to city streets to demand action. In Rio de Janeiro, protesters marched on the city’s famous Ipanema Beach. The pressure, both in Brazil and around the world, seems to have forced Bolsonaro to change his stance on the fires—at least temporarily. Last week, Bolsonaro ordered 44,000 troops to begin fighting the fires and to address the criminal activity behind them. Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Coral Reef Watch Program has indicated that coral reefs in Hawaii will enter into a major bleaching event within the next two months. Rising seawater temperatures causes coral bleaching, which change coral from their normal browns, greens and yellows into a white color. Right now, August ocean temperatures in Hawaii are 3 degrees higher than normal.  Brazilians march in the streets to demand action on fires burning in Amazon Coral can recover from moderate heat increases but will die if the higher temperatures remain over an extended period of time. Hawaii experienced an unprecedented coral bleaching event in 2014 and 2015 where, in some areas, over 50 percent of coral died. This bleaching event is expected to be even more severe. Anyone dipping their toes into the waters of Hawaii are asked to avoid touching corals or coral reefs and to use reef safe sunscreen.  Read the Latest Outdoor News Here In the past two weeks two men have died from cardiac arrest while hiking in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. On August 22, Kirk Lazar, 70, of Evans, Georgia, collapsed while hiking the Juney Whank Falls Trail near Bryson City, NC. Bystanders immediately began CPR and emergency medical personnel responded quickly, but Lazar could not be revived.last_img read more

Uruguay Announces Its Biggest-Ever Drug Seizure

first_imgBy Dialogo October 16, 2009 Uruguayan authorities confiscated some 2,000 kilos (4,400 lbs.) of cocaine at a small marina on the outskirts of Montevideo, the biggest drug haul in the history of the South American nation. Coast guard sources told EFE the seizure followed a six-week investigation that led to a yacht anchored on the Santa Lucia River in the town of Santiago Vazquez. Two people thought to be the owners of the yacht were arrested. Media outlets said the detainees were Polish or Serbian nationals who bought the British-registered vessel in Santiago Vazquez a few months ago for $265,000. The drugs apparently arrived in Uruguay by sea and were destined for European markets. Authorities think the yacht was to be used to transport the cocaine out of coastal waters for transfer to a larger ship to make the trans-Atlantic voyage. Cocaine is produced in Colombia, Peru and Bolivia.last_img read more

ETA Traffics in Colombian Cocaine, According to the Italian Writer Saviano

first_img “I have reason to believe, for example, that ETA members are buying cocaine from Colombian drug traffickers, transporting it to Portugal, and from there bringing it into the Basque Country,” said the author of the bestseller Gomorra [Gomorrah] about the Camorra, the Neapolitan mob. Saviano also cites the testimony of a repentant Italian mobster, Raffaele Spinello, according to whom ETA reached an agreement with the Camorra in 1999: “ETA agreed to use members of its organization to move cocaine in exchange for receiving arms from the Neapolitan mob (…).” “From the moment that ETA began to traffic in drugs, the reason for the group’s existence changed. Engaging in politics by taking up arms is no longer their priority. What is important for them now is the ‘business’ pure and simple,” commented Saviano, who still lives with bodyguards for fear of a mob hit. “Preparing attacks, acquiring arms, hiding fugitives from justice, providing financial help to the families of imprisoned ETA members … this is all very expensive,” he said. The seizure in the Basque Country at the end of January of packages of cocaine ready for sale, in the residence of an alleged ETA member, is “new and striking evidence that ETA traffics in drugs,” according to Saviano. The Basque armed separatist organization ETA traffics in Colombian cocaine to raise money and buy arms, the Italian journalist and writer Roberto Saviano has affirmed in the Spanish newspaper El Mundo. By Dialogo February 16, 2010 The Basque armed separatist organization, considered responsible for the deaths of 828 people in more than forty years of violence for the independence of the Basque Country (in northern Spain), is in contact with the Italian mafia and the FARC Colombian guerrilla group in order to engage in this traffic, Saviano added in an interview with El Mundo. “The terrorists obtained the cocaine through their contacts with the Colombian guerrillas and took responsibility for getting the drugs to Italy,” according to Saviano.last_img read more

Bolivia Takes Action Against Drug Trafficking

first_imgBy Dialogo October 01, 2011 seized 13.8 tons of cocaine seized 369.7 tons of marijuana destroyed 2,815 drug factories destroyed 3,469 coca maceration pits Drug trafficking and its effects have become a central subject of discussion on the Bolivian national agenda. Official sources confirm the increase of seized cocaine and drug-related criminal acts, and report government actions to counteract the illicit trade. From January to July 2011, the Bolivian Government: Source: www.lapatriaenlinea.com last_img read more

Brazilian Army Tests Cyber Warfare Simulator Ahead of 2014 World Cup

first_imgBy Dialogo February 25, 2013 I think it’s spectacular I love playing very neat hahaha it’s very good conqueror of all worlds, very good hhhmmmmmmmmmmm this game is awesome… WHAT’S THE QUALITY OF THIS GAME it’s cool one can’t play without downloading, and it downloads and it’s not enough, nooo, let us play without downloading Very good and interesting. it seems a good game to play that it’s a very pretty and stupid game because on the first level there’s a way, but not on the second, that’s why how do you play The Brazilian Army has a new weapon to fight the cyber war: the National Simulator for Cyber Operations. This software, known by its Portuguese acronym SIMOC, builds training environments that simulate known virtual threats — as well as threats not yet discovered. Decatron, a private company with 17 years in the information technology market, developed SIMOC for the Center of Cyber War Instruction (CIGE), which was instrumental in its design. The Brazilian Defense Ministry funded the project with a grant of $2.55 million. SIMOC is one of the pillars of Brazil’s National Defense Strategy to build equipment and platforms for cyber defense. “A team of information technology specialists is working exclusively on this project,” said Carlos Rust, director of Rio de Janeiro-based Decatron, which is the Brazilian partner of U.S. computer giant Hewlett Packard. Rust said the software took a year to develop and involved 30 Brazilian professionals. He said a centerpiece of the National Defense Strategy is promoting employment and generating revenues through the defense industry. “This is one of the most important projects developed by the Army’s Communications and Electronic Warface Center,” said General Antonino dos Santos Guerra, commander of the center, also known as CCOMGEX. The SIMOC simulator, he said, “is a solution that promotes national technology and helps to raise Brazil’s GDP.” Preparing for 2014 — and 2016 Rust also emphasized the importance of a national simulator that prepares Brazil for virtual defense as the country readies to host next year’s FIFA World Cup as well as the 2016 Summer Olympics. He told Diálogo that SIMOC’s main advantage is that is very nimble. “It is flexible and allows the creation of practically any scenario of defense or attack,” he said. “These scenarios are created by the instructor and are stored in a knowledge database to be reused. All the practices and actions of attack and defense are also stored for reutilization.” This flexibility is a major plus for SIMOC, given that most comparable software programs on the market include only a pre-defined number of scenarios and don’t allow for customization. But the Brazilian system was built based on international experience, since the Armed Forces are involved in these types of projects “in all countries of the world,” Gen. Dos Santos said. The simulator software helps analyze network vulnerabilities, which lets users act in a controlled environment while adopting an active defense strategy, he said. Training is based on real scenarios of disasters and risks to Brazil’s critical infrastructure. System is adaptable for military and civilian training SIMOC works with usernames and passwords. Once logged in, a user may choose to reproduce an existing computer network or build a new one. The software allows technical reporting of all operations conducted in the virtual environment. The simulator is dual-use, “meaning that the software can be used for military training and for civilian training in big companies,” Rust said. “It also can be used to conduct analysis of network vulnerabilities, not just for training.” The application utilizes virtualization technology running several operating systems from one terminal, and various open-source components to meet certain requirements. While the use of open-source software may raise some eyebrows, Rust does not see it as a security risk. “Some of the functionalities were built utilizing open-source software, which is an advantage because we have control of the code,” he said. “This way we generate a complete product at the same level of the most advanced foreign solutions, with 100 percent control of it.” Brazil determined not to let hackers win With the World Cup coming up in June 2014, at least one group besides the athletes themselves are working hard to make the most of the event: computer hackers. But the Brazilian government has invested $20.4 million to avoid attacks on state-run networks as well as computerized infrastructure systems such as airports. “The possibility that Brazil will suffer a massive attack is the same as that of someone declaring war on the country,” said General José Carlos dos Santos, commander of Brasília’s Center for Cyber Defense (CDCiber), in a recent interview with Correio Braziliense. “It is low, but it exists.” CDCiber is getting ready for all eventualities. Army Colonel Eduardo Wallier Vianna, with the center, warns that a cyber-attack could really wreak havoc on the World Cup. “Let’s suppose that someone invades the database of the World Cup’s ticket system and starts selling duplicate tickets,” he told the newspaper Folha de São Paulo. “Hundreds of people would arrive at the stadium with fake tickets. That would generate confusion, wild crowds and deaths.” To avoid this chaos and the resulting damage to Brazil’s international prestige, CDCiber “identifies the most critical areas, analyzes the information and studies previous cases,” Col. Vianna said. Courses in cyber warfare At SIMOC’s unveiling in the CCOMGEX auditorium, officers demonstrated how they used the software during a CIGE exercise as part of a course on cyber warfare — the first such course ever offered by the Brazilian Armed Forces to Army, Navy and Air Force personnel. Also attending the event was Decatron’s executive manager, Bruno Mello, along with Lieutanant Colonel Márcio Ricardo Fava, of CCOMGEX, and other military officials. In 2012, 24 high-ranking officers at CCOMGEX took a six-month course to operate SIMOC, and are now qualified to face virtual threats such as common are hackers and organized groups that attack sites in order to draw attention to a cause — not to mention criminals, spies and cyber warriors. SIMOC can also be used remotely, which puts it within the reach of other Brazilian military institutions. “It only needs an instructor to go to the other institution to coordinate the activities of the simulator,” dos Santos explained, adding that while the technology is also available to interested educational institutions, “we need to be careful whom we train.”last_img read more

UPPs Drive Criminals From Rio’s Favelas Ahead of 2014 FIFA World Cup

first_img RIO DE JANEIRO — Residents of the sprawling shantytowns known as favelas that surround Rio de Janeiro have benefitted from a dramatic drop in drug-related violence and street crime since the establishment of a comprehensive policing program known as Police Pacification Units [Unidades de Policia Pacificadora, or UPP] five years ago, authorities said. “There’s no possibility of a backlash now from criminals. We work to improve services to provide security for the population,” said Pedro Dantas, a spokesman for Rio de Janeiro’s public safety department. The UPP program, now operating in 221 communities throughout Rio, has benefitted 1.5 million inhabitants with the goal of restoring control in urban areas that not long ago were gripped by drug-trafficking gangs. The idea is also to gain the trust of local residents as Brazil prepares to host the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics. The program may soon be extended to cover an additional 860,000 residents living in favelas north and west of the city, as well as in Baixada Fluminense and in towns with a high urban concentration, said the Public Security Secretary’s press office. As recently as 2008, inhabitants of Rio’s favelas were trapped by crossfire on a daily basis, living in fear as drug lords ruled their neighborhoods and gangs took to the streets to fight for territory. No sense of order seemed to exist. UPPs could involve 12,500 officers by 2014 Looking for answers, José Mariano Beltrame — secretary of Rio’s public security department — and Rio de Janeiro’s state governor, Sergio Cabral, turned to Colombia. That country’s success in bringing down the incidence of crime in big cities like Bogotá and Medellín convinced Beltrame and Cabral to introduce a similar system for Rio de Janeiro. In late 2008, authorities established the first UPP in Santa Marta, gradually expanding to 33 other communities such as Complexo do Alemão, which at one point was considered the epicentre of criminal activity. The peacekeeping initiative follows a series of stages that begins with the elite force known as Batalhão de Operações Policiais Especiais (BOPE). Sweeping the favela, BOPE troops arrest criminals, seizing weapons and drugs in the process. Once the favela is “pacified,” authorities then establish a permanent community policing force in the area. The decision to set up a UPP is based on information as well as an investigation into the criminal profile of gangs that run a specific favela, Dante said. Officers are selected from the Military Police Academy and receive specialized training such as conflict prevention. As of the end of April, the UPP has involved 8,360 police officers — a figure expected to climb to 12,500 by 2014, said the public security office. Favela residents now more ‘trustful’ So far, police have established 32 UPPs; another eight more are planned by next year. These, along with the modernization and integration of civil and military police, have helped bring down Rio’s homicide rate by 32.2 percent since 2006. “The single most important change associated with life under the UPP is that residents can now move about the favela much more freely,” said a World Bank report issued in January. The introduction of UPPs has opened up a “space for the imagination of daily life in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro that is not dictated by the powers of the drug trade,” the report said. Dantas agreed, noting that favela residents now feel more “trustful” — and in some cases are even offering the UPPs tips on where to find stashes of drugs or firearms. At the same time, he said, police have noticed an increasing acceptance of their presence by local residents. “The goal of the Public Security Secretary is to occupy every area controlled by gangs that use war weapons to control residents’ lives,” Dantas said. “In places where the UPPs have been around for a longer period of time, the general mood among residents is that life has improved a lot … A new virtuous cycle has gained strength.” What the Press Liaison for the State Secretary of Security did not say is that this occupation did not lead to the arrest of a single criminal. All of the communities were forewarned days in advance of the occupation and the implementation of the UPPs (Pacifying Police Units). The criminals had time to move into the shantytowns controlled by the same factions. Life has become a veritable hell for residents of these peripheral areas. The idea that the violence is over is a lie. Trafficking continues in the occupied areas and just a few days ago a German was shot in ROCINHA, as he was “visiting”. We need to feel sorry for the tourists who come to this Cup. The government (regardless of color) creates the police entity “that performs miracles”. The “fantastic results” are measured through another entity also of the government and then the media is used to spread the results. At the end, crime has virtually decreased, but the reality is that the country is a disaster. The roots of the problem, such as social decomposition, lack of education, family disintegration, irresponsible parenthood, police corruption, drug trafficking….will remain there, because you cannot order change, you have to work on it for many years. the intelligent men’s games are almost ready, we should wait to play A great civilization is not destroyed from the outside until it destroys itself from the inside By Dialogo June 17, 2013last_img read more

Peruvian National Police dismantle Los Malditos del Triunfo

first_img During the ceremony, authorities detailed a series of security successes achieved during the first six months of 2014: • Security forces throughout the country detained more than 6,000 criminal suspects for various offenses, including drug trafficking. • Authorities confiscated 10 million Peruvian soles that authorities believe were generated from drug trafficking. • Police agents carried out 6,670 initiatives against organized crime groups, and seized 129 weapons. • Working with the Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (DEVIDA) and the Project for the Control and Reduction of Illegal Crops in the Alto Huallaga (CORAH), security forces eradicated 14,700 hectares of illegal coca leaf crops and 660 coca seedlings. • Authorities dismantled 640 clandestine laboratories which were allegedly used by drug trafficking organizations to process and manufacture cocaine base, cocaine hydrochloride, and opium derivatives. Police also seized more than one million doses of chemical precursors. • Security forces destroyed 91 clandestine airstrips used by drug trafficking groups. Los Malditos del Triunfo were led by Segundo Samuel Correa Gamarra, who is also known as “Paco.” Peruvian police captured Paco in January 2010 in Chepén province. He is now incarcerated in the Miguel Castro Castro prison in Lima. Los Malditos del Triunfo engage in a variety of criminal enterprises, including the extortion of individuals and businesses, property theft, arms trading, money laundering, and assassinations of rival gang members and others. The gang is suspected in the 2013 killing of security agent José Alva Vásquez. A team of gunmen shot Alva Vasquez was shot to death on March 31, 2014 at a festival in the district of La Esperanza, in Trujillo. Alva Vásquez was enjoying his day off when a team of at least six attackers entered the festival and started shooting at César León Díaz, who was also known as “Super Loco.” The gunmen killed Alva Vásquez and Super Loco, then ran away. Peru’s security forces dismantled 24 drug trafficking gangs during the first six months of 2014, authorities said. The Anti-Drug Directorate (DIRANDRO) of the National Police of Peru (PNP) also captured three dozen members of Los Malditos del Triunfo, an organized crime group which engages in assassinations, extortion, money laundering, arms trafficking,. General Vicente Romero Fernández, director of DIRANDRO, reported these and other accomplishments on June 26, during a ceremony celebrating the 23rd anniversary of the establishment of DIRANDRO. The PNP leader discussed security successes from January through June 24, according to La Jornada. Security forces also seized more than 13 tons of drugs, Romero Fernández said. Interior Minister Daniel Urresti, General Jorge Flores Goycochea, director of the PNP, and several high-ranking civilian officials attended the event. The ceremony was held at the Police Social Club in La Molina. Authorities honored 25 DIRANDRO officers for their outstanding work fighting drug trafficking. During the ceremony, Urresti said that he wants to see security forces destroy drug labs, detain drug traffickers, and dismantle clandestine landing strips used by airplane pilots who smuggle drugs, according to El Peruano. Using technology to fight crime The various security operations show the government’s determination to fight drug trafficking, Romero said during the DIRANDRO ceremony, according to Andina. “These military operations reflect the commitment to achieving the eradication of illegal drug trafficking and prevent their use,” he said. Security forces are continuing to carry out initiatives against drug trafficking organizations. For example, on June 26, the National Police carried out simultaneous operations in Lima, Chepén, Tarapoto, and Trujillo. Law enforcement officers arrested 30 people including alleged enforcers and suspected extortionists. The security operations targeted alleged members of Los Malditos del Triunfo, a violent organized crime group. Security forces also arrested a lawyer and an accountant, according to published reports. The arrests capped a four-month investigation which was supervised by prosecutor William Rabanal Palacios. At least 50 prosecutors and dozens of police officers participated in the operation, El Comercio reported on July 6. Peruvian security forces are using technology to fight Los Malditos del Triunfo and other criminal groups. Security forces are using computer databases to create maps which show where crime is occurring throughout the country. The map helps police develop strategies to combat criminal activity, according to Diego Salazar, principal investigator of the Andean Journal of Political Studies. The maps are helping security forces “prioritize” how they use their resources in the fight against criminal groups, Salazar said. The terrorist group Shining Path is the largest organized crime group in Peru. The group engages in drug trafficking, arms smuggling, money laundering, and the production of coca paste. International drug trafficking organizations also operate in Peru. These include the Sinaloa Cartel, based in Mexico, and Los Rastrojos and Los Urabeños, two Colombian-based drug trafficking groups. A series of security successes center_img Los Malditos del Triunfo By Dialogo August 13, 2014 Commitment to reducing drug trafficking The United States is cooperating with Peru in the fight against drug trafficking. Brian Nichols, the U.S. ambassador in Lima, recently acknowledged the successes of Peruvian security forces. “I want to acknowledge the important work of the Public Prosecutor’s Office, Attorney General’s Office, and their entire team,” Nichols said on July 9 during the signing of a joint cooperation agreement between the two countries to fight money laundering, according to Inforegión. The agreement, signed between the Public Prosecutor’s Office of Peru and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), calls for authorities to develop a specialized program to train 250 Peruvian prosecutors in the best methods to investigate and prosecute money laundering. The cooperation agreement also includes the participation of the National Police, the Superintendency of Banks, and the Financial Intelligence Unit (UIF). The two countries will also share information. International cooperation in the fight against organized crime syndicates is important, because of the transnational nature of drug trafficking and other criminal enterprises, Salazar said. Cooperation in the fight against drug trafficking last_img read more

Colombian Air Force Helps Fight Forest Fires

first_imgBy helping to extinguish fires, the CAF has developed a close relationship with the civilian population. In addition to helping fight fires, the Air Force also trains civilian firefighters. CAF commanders deployed a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter, which was able to transport 600 gallons of water in a Bambi Bucket. Nearby water sources were too shallow to deploy the Bambi Bucket effectively, so the commander of the Third Air Combat Command at the time, Colonel David Barrero Barrero, sent a C-95 aircraft with a 5,000-gallon portable pool that could be filled by a tanker. Fires have occurred in almost 80 percent of the country and have destroyed thousands of hectares, mostly virgin vegetation and natural forests, according to authorities. Some regions are particularly susceptible to fires because of the weather pattern known as El Niño, which can create warmer and drier than usual conditions in different parts of the world. Air Force trains with firefighters In late January, 10 members participated in special training at the University of Texas Training Center, in Laredo. Specialized personnel such as chiefs of security operations, fire chiefs, and aeronautical firefighters attended the 10 days of training and acquired fundamental skills to face a real emergency in the event of an airplane fire. The sessions included simulations of fires and rescues, as well as international protocols for fires in turbines and airplanes. It has also helped the civilian population in a variety of other ways, according to retired Colonel Michel Martínez Poinsenet, from the Colombian Army’s Military Intelligence branch and a member of the Colombia chapter of the Security and Defense Network of Latin America (RESDAL). Ongoing training is a key component of the CAF’s mission to help fight fires. The CAF also helped extinguish another fire in October covering nearly 100 hectares in Boyacá Department. They responded at the request of Mayor Pablo Solano and were able to protect the municipality of Floresta’s water sources. Volunteer firefighters from municipalities including Nilo, Tocaima, Anapoima, La Mesa, Mosquera, and Bogotá participated in an exercise involving a simulated forest fire in which firefighters guided a helicopter equipped with a Bambi Bucket. During the training exercise, the pilot released water from the Bambi Bucket four times, using specific coordinates. For example, air base personnel help collect trash and recyclables in various ecologically important sites. Air Force personnel also participate in quarterly discussions and environmental awareness campaigns on subjects such as global warming, care and protection of the environment, reforestation, how to save water and use it efficiently, and the prevention of illegal trafficking in controlled species. The CAF also helps the civilian population by helping preserve and protect the environment. Strong ties to the civilian population The CAF uses a variety of equipment to help extinguish forest fires, such as an artificial pool with the capacity to store 10,000 gallons of water with retardant chemicals to fight fires. Its helicopter pilots also use a water carrier known as a Bambi Bucket, which can hold 900 liters, to drop on flames. The four days of training included theory lessons on meteorology, cartography, risk management, rescue equipment, fire extinguishing systems, and dangers during emergencies. The lessons were a prelude to practical exercises performed at the Luis F. Pinto Air Base in Melgar, Tolima Department. The Air Force “continues to develop significant projects in science and technology to develop multi-purpose aircraft and other maintenance projects, not only for defense but also for national integration through the aeronautical industry,” Martínez Poinsenet said. In addition to helping fight fires, the Air Force also trains civilian firefighters. Similarly, in March 2014, it responded quickly to forest fires that broke out in the municipality of Malambo, Atlántico Department. There, strong winds spread the fire quickly. “An example of this is the Eastern Air Group which, since 1996 (in Marandúa, Vichada), has been able to construct waste water treatment plants, potable water plants, water bottling plants, solid waste management plants, and has led public awareness campaigns and Project Marandúa,” said Col. Martínez Poinsenet. Project Marandúa focuses on the production and usage of air, water, and food. Since early January, the CAF has been cooperating with firefighters, the Colombian National Army, National Police, Red Cross, Civil Defense, Risk Management Unit, and local municipalities to stop forest fires in the departments of Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Boyacá, Santander, Risaralda, and Magdalena. The CAF also helped extinguish another fire in October covering nearly 100 hectares in Boyacá Department. They responded at the request of Mayor Pablo Solano and were able to protect the municipality of Floresta’s water sources. The CAF uses a variety of equipment to help extinguish forest fires, such as an artificial pool with the capacity to store 10,000 gallons of water with retardant chemicals to fight fires. Its helicopter pilots also use a water carrier known as a Bambi Bucket, which can hold 900 liters, to drop on flames. It has also helped the civilian population in a variety of other ways, according to retired Colonel Michel Martínez Poinsenet, from the Colombian Army’s Military Intelligence branch and a member of the Colombia chapter of the Security and Defense Network of Latin America (RESDAL). Ongoing training is a key component of the CAF’s mission to help fight fires. In January, the Air Force sent helicopters from the Fifth Air Combat Command to fight two of the most dangerous, active conflagrations on record in the country in Boyacá Department. The Army, National Police, Civil Defense, and other agencies also cooperated in fighting the Boyacá fires, using the National Disaster Prevention and Response System. For example, air base personnel help collect trash and recyclables in various ecologically important sites. Air Force personnel also participate in quarterly discussions and environmental awareness campaigns on subjects such as global warming, care and protection of the environment, reforestation, how to save water and use it efficiently, and the prevention of illegal trafficking in controlled species. Air Force firefighters train in the United States Previous FAC efforts to help fight fires The CAF also helps the civilian population by helping preserve and protect the environment. The four days of training included theory lessons on meteorology, cartography, risk management, rescue equipment, fire extinguishing systems, and dangers during emergencies. The lessons were a prelude to practical exercises performed at the Luis F. Pinto Air Base in Melgar, Tolima Department. In late January, 10 members participated in special training at the University of Texas Training Center, in Laredo. Specialized personnel such as chiefs of security operations, fire chiefs, and aeronautical firefighters attended the 10 days of training and acquired fundamental skills to face a real emergency in the event of an airplane fire. The sessions included simulations of fires and rescues, as well as international protocols for fires in turbines and airplanes. In January, the Air Force sent helicopters from the Fifth Air Combat Command to fight two of the most dangerous, active conflagrations on record in the country in Boyacá Department. The Army, National Police, Civil Defense, and other agencies also cooperated in fighting the Boyacá fires, using the National Disaster Prevention and Response System. Air Force trains with firefighters The second exercise concerned rescuing people trapped by forest fires. The exercise simulated rescuing people from an area that was difficult to access. The firefighters needed to signal to helicopter crews carrying a tow system the exact location to rescue the victims. The exercise ended with the successful extraction of the injured people. By Dialogo February 24, 2015 Volunteer firefighters from municipalities including Nilo, Tocaima, Anapoima, La Mesa, Mosquera, and Bogotá participated in an exercise involving a simulated forest fire in which firefighters guided a helicopter equipped with a Bambi Bucket. During the training exercise, the pilot released water from the Bambi Bucket four times, using specific coordinates. The second exercise concerned rescuing people trapped by forest fires. The exercise simulated rescuing people from an area that was difficult to access. The firefighters needed to signal to helicopter crews carrying a tow system the exact location to rescue the victims. The exercise ended with the successful extraction of the injured people. Since early January, the CAF has been cooperating with firefighters, the Colombian National Army, National Police, Red Cross, Civil Defense, Risk Management Unit, and local municipalities to stop forest fires in the departments of Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Boyacá, Santander, Risaralda, and Magdalena. Similarly, in March 2014, it responded quickly to forest fires that broke out in the municipality of Malambo, Atlántico Department. There, strong winds spread the fire quickly. For example, in early February, the Fourth Air Combat Command trained a group of volunteer firefighters from the Department of Cundinamarca in techniques to guide the aircraft that would support ground missions with a focus on increasing efforts in the event of forest fires, natural disasters, or catastrophes. Previous FAC efforts to help fight fires The Colombian Air Force (CAF) is playing an important role in fighting forest fires throughout the country. By helping to extinguish fires, the CAF has developed a close relationship with the civilian population. Air Force firefighters train in the United States The Colombian Air Force (CAF) is playing an important role in fighting forest fires throughout the country. CAF commanders deployed a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter, which was able to transport 600 gallons of water in a Bambi Bucket. Nearby water sources were too shallow to deploy the Bambi Bucket effectively, so the commander of the Third Air Combat Command at the time, Colonel David Barrero Barrero, sent a C-95 aircraft with a 5,000-gallon portable pool that could be filled by a tanker. Strong ties to the civilian population For example, in early February, the Fourth Air Combat Command trained a group of volunteer firefighters from the Department of Cundinamarca in techniques to guide the aircraft that would support ground missions with a focus on increasing efforts in the event of forest fires, natural disasters, or catastrophes. Fires have occurred in almost 80 percent of the country and have destroyed thousands of hectares, mostly virgin vegetation and natural forests, according to authorities. Some regions are particularly susceptible to fires because of the weather pattern known as El Niño, which can create warmer and drier than usual conditions in different parts of the world. “An example of this is the Eastern Air Group which, since 1996 (in Marandúa, Vichada), has been able to construct waste water treatment plants, potable water plants, water bottling plants, solid waste management plants, and has led public awareness campaigns and Project Marandúa,” said Col. Martínez Poinsenet. Project Marandúa focuses on the production and usage of air, water, and food. The CAF has played an important role in efforts to halt forest fires in Colombia in recent years. The CAF has played an important role in efforts to halt forest fires in Colombia in recent years. The Air Force “continues to develop significant projects in science and technology to develop multi-purpose aircraft and other maintenance projects, not only for defense but also for national integration through the aeronautical industry,” Martínez Poinsenet said.last_img read more

Brazilian Minister of Defense Says Technology Transfer is Crucial in Closing Deals with Brazil

first_img Diálogo: How do you see the use of the Armed Forces in combating drug trafficking? Minister Wagner: In regards to the PROSUB, the technology being transferred concerns submarine building. The propulsion is national merit though; the merit of several generations of the Brazilian Navy which, over 30 years ago, believed that it was crucial to have this control over uranium enrichment, and the propulsion is ours. We are actually partnering with Argentina, where we will be sharing this knowledge for the production of drugs in the treatment of various diseases, so that’s why I say that the technology you bring in gets carried over to other segments. And that’s what interests us. Approximately 38,000 men will ensure the security of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The primary objective is prevention, according to information released by the Brazilian Ministry of Defense in March. The country should spend about 200 million dollars only on the event’s security between 2014 and the end of the Olympics, the Ministry said. Diálogo: What is LAAD’s importance to Brazil’s national security? To discuss this and other topics, Diálogo spoke with Brazilian Minister of Defense Jaques Wagner, during LAAD Defense & Security 2015 International Exhibition, the largest and most important trade show for the defense and security sectors in Latin America, which this year gathered over 700 exhibitors from 71 countries across three Riocentro pavilions in Rio de Janeiro, from April 14 to 17. Minister Wagner: In regards to the PROSUB, the technology being transferred concerns submarine building. The propulsion is national merit though; the merit of several generations of the Brazilian Navy which, over 30 years ago, believed that it was crucial to have this control over uranium enrichment, and the propulsion is ours. We are actually partnering with Argentina, where we will be sharing this knowledge for the production of drugs in the treatment of various diseases, so that’s why I say that the technology you bring in gets carried over to other segments. And that’s what interests us. Minister Wagner: I can tell you that Brazil intends to purchase materials and equipment, especially when it comes to the prevention of terrorist, cyber, chemical, biological, and nuclear attacks, as well as to avoid radioactive incidents. Minister Jaques Wagner: I would say that this expo is extremely important for the defense and national security industry. This is a growing industry throughout the world, in which Brazil has businesses that are becoming stronger. I would mention Embraer and the manufacturing of the KC-390 aircraft as examples, since it is about to be marketed. It is an industry that we have been developing. This industry brings technology and skills. This is part of the interest of our national development program, and therefore it is important because it showcases Brazil’s potential, builds partnerships, and – I would say– introduces innovation and technology, which will end up benefiting the domestic industry as a whole. Minister Wagner: The word “impede” is absolute, and I don’t like to use it, but evidently, in terms of the variables we use to pick a winner in any area, the technology transfer variable is among the most important ones, because we want a whole-package deal. I would rather not name countries that may have offered equipment that appeared more advantageous, but as far as a package deal, without disclosing the source code, without disclosure and transfer of technology, honestly, we are not interested. We have a democracy of over 200 million people, and we have a well-settled industrial base, and we want to fly higher, as opposed to being mere buyers. So, I would say that the technology transfer variable is one of extremely high importance when closing any Brazilian deal. Diálogo: Is that what tipped the scale in favor of Gripen? Diálogo: We have recently seen many protests against the federal government. What do you think of this kind of protest? Diálogo: In your opening speech for LAAD, you mentioned that technology transfer is crucial when it comes to closing deals with the Brazilian Armed Forces. Was the Gripen aircraft chosen over the United States’ F-18 for that reason, because the Swedes are willing to transfer technology? Does the absence of technology transfer automatically impede a country from closing a deal with the Brazilian Armed Forces? Diálogo: Are any technologies or equipment from LAAD 2015 being considered for use to that effect? Minister Wagner: In the case of the Gripen, yes. This was key, and also in the case of the PROSUB, our nuclear submarine. Evidently, there is always a counterpart, which is a Brazilian company, because the government is not the one that is going to absorb this technology, because we want this intelligence to stay in the country. So, in the case of the Gripen, we are sending 250 to 280 engineers to Sweden to complete this transfer process. Diálogo: In your opening speech for LAAD, you mentioned that technology transfer is crucial when it comes to closing deals with the Brazilian Armed Forces. Was the Gripen aircraft chosen over the United States’ F-18 for that reason, because the Swedes are willing to transfer technology? Does the absence of technology transfer automatically impede a country from closing a deal with the Brazilian Armed Forces? Minister Wagner: Yes. There will be a large investment on SISFRON, which, as I mentioned, is a border control technology that is in the process of being implemented. Minister Wagner: Just to clarify: this expo is about defense and security. I am not the most qualified person to speak strictly about security, but all the border control part, the SISFRON, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) issue, yes, of course there is the possibility of using what is being showcased in LAAD. There are many technologies. Today, when you watch your airspace, you are also watching for an aircraft that is flying without registering with our control system. When you guard a border, from the land or fluvial perspective, if you have a vessel that is traveling without being licensed by the Port Authority, all this can be used to detect and surprise a trafficking operation. We cannot remove ourselves from the drug trafficking issue. When you guard your airspace, your land, maritime, and river borders, of course you are creating obstacles for trafficking in weapons and drugs. Minister Jaques Wagner: I would say that this expo is extremely important for the defense and national security industry. This is a growing industry throughout the world, in which Brazil has businesses that are becoming stronger. I would mention Embraer and the manufacturing of the KC-390 aircraft as examples, since it is about to be marketed. It is an industry that we have been developing. This industry brings technology and skills. This is part of the interest of our national development program, and therefore it is important because it showcases Brazil’s potential, builds partnerships, and – I would say– introduces innovation and technology, which will end up benefiting the domestic industry as a whole. Diálogo: Is that what tipped the scale in favor of Gripen? Diálogo: We have recently seen many protests against the federal government. What do you think of this kind of protest? Minister Wagner: Understandably, the government continues to observe them with humility and tranquility. I think this is reason for an inner pride for Brazilians. Not all countries have the democratic maturity to handle street protests and corruption investigations that have affected many segments, and still maintain its institutional serenity and functionality. I think this is proof of the Brazilian democracy’s consistency. The government should attempt to respond to the people’s wishes, making adjustments that allow us to grow. Power is conquered by popular vote, but also lost by popular vote. The report overall is very interesting. It provides us with information about the technology we need to defend the country. Our defense minister, Jaques Wagner, is quite right about the transfer of technology. Could you imagine investing a fortune to buy equipment, and then have to depend on [technological] support from those who sold us the equipment? It would be absurd to accept buying under certain restrictions! Afterward, we would be at the mercy of the seller’s demands. Yes, we absolutely need to demand technology transfer. About the Technology Transfer policy, sensational and extremely sensible and mature for our Defense Ministry to say that “we are not interested in purchasing a package deal (…) that we are a democracy with over 200 million inhabitants, a very solid industrial base and we want to reach greater heights than being mere buyers. Because just as he says, “the technology that you bring will explode to other sectors. This is what interests us.”” – Brazil! Show your face! I want to see who pays for us to stay like this!” very good. instructive and up-to-date. Why is it when journalists interview military authorities, their salaries aren’t discussed? Far from reality. Signals Minister Wagner’s concern regarding security policy and combating drug trafficking. The Federal Police must thoroughly investigate and punish all corrupt individuals up to the Godfather of the Brazilian mafia, and put them all in jail. Thank you Globo network for allowing me to make a few simple comments. Have a good afternoon everyone. Much success to the journalists Brazil. A country that does not even have money for education cannot provide the luxury of hosting the World Cup and Olympics, spending 200 million dollars on security alone. We are already paying the cost of the World Cup. There will be more next year. THE ARMED FORCES ONLY SERVE FOR THIS AND NOTHING ELSE. PAY WHAT YOU OWE US. Jaques Wagner is actually one of the few thinking minds with logical reasoning. He will certainly help in many areas and contribute to a “turnaround” of the way things are with the worst corruption in the country. I like Minister Wagner’s points of view!! I think that a well structured and efficient Ministry of Defense would be very profitable for our country. A lot of work is needed to secure our riches and borders. To be honest, I think Wagner is a strong, wise, intelligent man who could make it to President in all humility. YES! It’s best not to ADOPT this article whether or not you like it.Read the text and know that it is written for Brazilians to feel sure of themselves.JOÃO RIBEIRO PADILHA: age 82. Monday, May 25, 2015 8:39 a.m. Is this minister innocent or malicious? Gen. Augusto Heleno once said very appropriately that something like “Technology Transfer” doesn’t exist. To understand a thesis, you need to at least understand it. A four year old in pre-school would never be able to understand a mathematical equation of a first year college student of Electronic Engineering. They may try to “transfer the know-how” to him, but he won’t get it. So, a Brazil that is out of place due to its declining academic quality is no longer even the country of the future. It is now the country of the past because it’s backwards. Congratulations on the interview. Striving to succeed with the 2016 Olympics in Brazil. It would be good for the country to think about the consequences ahead of time to successfully carry out its plan. I don’t think Argentina can be beat commercially and even less so in terms of the military. We are at the peak of our abilities. Diálogo: What about the PROSUB? Minister Wagner: I can tell you that Brazil intends to purchase materials and equipment, especially when it comes to the prevention of terrorist, cyber, chemical, biological, and nuclear attacks, as well as to avoid radioactive incidents. Diálogo: Brazil is going to invest heavily to ensure the security of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio. Could you tell us about investments in this area? Diálogo: What about the PROSUB? Diálogo: Brazil is going to invest heavily to ensure the security of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio. Could you tell us about investments in this area? Diálogo: Will there be investments on new technologies to combat organized transnational crime? Minister Wagner: Just to clarify: this expo is about defense and security. I am not the most qualified person to speak strictly about security, but all the border control part, the SISFRON, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) issue, yes, of course there is the possibility of using what is being showcased in LAAD. There are many technologies. Today, when you watch your airspace, you are also watching for an aircraft that is flying without registering with our control system. When you guard a border, from the land or fluvial perspective, if you have a vessel that is traveling without being licensed by the Port Authority, all this can be used to detect and surprise a trafficking operation. We cannot remove ourselves from the drug trafficking issue. When you guard your airspace, your land, maritime, and river borders, of course you are creating obstacles for trafficking in weapons and drugs. Minister Wagner: The fight against drug trafficking is directly linked to the Ministry of Justice, while border control is directly linked to the Ministry of Defense and the SISFRON [ Integrated border monitoring system], which falls mainly under the Brazilian Army’s responsibility, but is in fact a joint operation with the three forces. There is an interaction, especially in the border control area, and also when it comes to fluvial issues, as is the case with our internal borders with other South American countries. We have improved in regards to the exchange of information, and it is obvious that there is also an interaction with the Ministry of Justice, because we are facing a silent war, namely the traffic of drugs and weapons. To discuss this and other topics, Diálogo spoke with Brazilian Minister of Defense Jaques Wagner, during LAAD Defense & Security 2015 International Exhibition, the largest and most important trade show for the defense and security sectors in Latin America, which this year gathered over 700 exhibitors from 71 countries across three Riocentro pavilions in Rio de Janeiro, from April 14 to 17. By Dialogo April 27, 2015 Minister Wagner: The fight against drug trafficking is directly linked to the Ministry of Justice, while border control is directly linked to the Ministry of Defense and the SISFRON [ Integrated border monitoring system], which falls mainly under the Brazilian Army’s responsibility, but is in fact a joint operation with the three forces. There is an interaction, especially in the border control area, and also when it comes to fluvial issues, as is the case with our internal borders with other South American countries. We have improved in regards to the exchange of information, and it is obvious that there is also an interaction with the Ministry of Justice, because we are facing a silent war, namely the traffic of drugs and weapons. Minister Wagner: Understandably, the government continues to observe them with humility and tranquility. I think this is reason for an inner pride for Brazilians. Not all countries have the democratic maturity to handle street protests and corruption investigations that have affected many segments, and still maintain its institutional serenity and functionality. I think this is proof of the Brazilian democracy’s consistency. The government should attempt to respond to the people’s wishes, making adjustments that allow us to grow. Power is conquered by popular vote, but also lost by popular vote. Diálogo: Are any technologies or equipment from LAAD 2015 being considered for use to that effect? Diálogo: What is LAAD’s importance to Brazil’s national security? Diálogo: Will there be investments on new technologies to combat organized transnational crime? Minister Wagner: In the case of the Gripen, yes. This was key, and also in the case of the PROSUB, our nuclear submarine. Evidently, there is always a counterpart, which is a Brazilian company, because the government is not the one that is going to absorb this technology, because we want this intelligence to stay in the country. So, in the case of the Gripen, we are sending 250 to 280 engineers to Sweden to complete this transfer process. Minister Wagner: Yes. There will be a large investment on SISFRON, which, as I mentioned, is a border control technology that is in the process of being implemented. Approximately 38,000 men will ensure the security of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The primary objective is prevention, according to information released by the Brazilian Ministry of Defense in March. The country should spend about 200 million dollars only on the event’s security between 2014 and the end of the Olympics, the Ministry said. Minister Wagner: The word “impede” is absolute, and I don’t like to use it, but evidently, in terms of the variables we use to pick a winner in any area, the technology transfer variable is among the most important ones, because we want a whole-package deal. I would rather not name countries that may have offered equipment that appeared more advantageous, but as far as a package deal, without disclosing the source code, without disclosure and transfer of technology, honestly, we are not interested. We have a democracy of over 200 million people, and we have a well-settled industrial base, and we want to fly higher, as opposed to being mere buyers. So, I would say that the technology transfer variable is one of extremely high importance when closing any Brazilian deal. Diálogo: How do you see the use of the Armed Forces in combating drug trafficking? last_img read more