Halifax Giving Extra Awards recognise local fundraisers

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Halifax’s 2015 Giving Extra Awards have resulted in 66 local winners this year. Now in their third year, the awards recognise people who make a difference in their community.Halifax received thousands of nominations from across the country for this year’s awards, with nominations made online or in Halifax branches throughout October and November 2015.Fundraising winners included Grace Leahy, who has raised thousands to fund a new set of wheelchairs for Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, Joan Naylor (pictured), a key member of Save Hemsby Coastline, which raises funds to protect the coastline from erosion, and Paul Strank, who has raised over £2 million for a various charities in South London.The 66 local Halifax Giving Extra Award winners will each receive £300 in Supercheque vouchers. The winners will now go forward to the next round of judging to find seven regional winners. These will be announced by the end of February and will each receive £5,000 to further aid their communities.Russell Galley, group director, Halifax Community Bank, said:“Halifax is committed to bringing communities closer together.  We believe we should give extra back to people like these winners who are pivotal to driving positive and lasting change.”  146 total views,  1 views today Advertisement Halifax Giving Extra Awards recognise local fundraisers Tagged with: Awards Community fundraising Melanie May | 12 February 2016 | News  147 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Colombian Air Force Helps Fight Forest Fires

first_imgBy helping to extinguish fires, the CAF has developed a close relationship with the civilian population. In addition to helping fight fires, the Air Force also trains civilian firefighters. CAF commanders deployed a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter, which was able to transport 600 gallons of water in a Bambi Bucket. Nearby water sources were too shallow to deploy the Bambi Bucket effectively, so the commander of the Third Air Combat Command at the time, Colonel David Barrero Barrero, sent a C-95 aircraft with a 5,000-gallon portable pool that could be filled by a tanker. Fires have occurred in almost 80 percent of the country and have destroyed thousands of hectares, mostly virgin vegetation and natural forests, according to authorities. Some regions are particularly susceptible to fires because of the weather pattern known as El Niño, which can create warmer and drier than usual conditions in different parts of the world. Air Force trains with firefighters In late January, 10 members participated in special training at the University of Texas Training Center, in Laredo. Specialized personnel such as chiefs of security operations, fire chiefs, and aeronautical firefighters attended the 10 days of training and acquired fundamental skills to face a real emergency in the event of an airplane fire. The sessions included simulations of fires and rescues, as well as international protocols for fires in turbines and airplanes. It has also helped the civilian population in a variety of other ways, according to retired Colonel Michel Martínez Poinsenet, from the Colombian Army’s Military Intelligence branch and a member of the Colombia chapter of the Security and Defense Network of Latin America (RESDAL). Ongoing training is a key component of the CAF’s mission to help fight fires. The CAF also helped extinguish another fire in October covering nearly 100 hectares in Boyacá Department. They responded at the request of Mayor Pablo Solano and were able to protect the municipality of Floresta’s water sources. Volunteer firefighters from municipalities including Nilo, Tocaima, Anapoima, La Mesa, Mosquera, and Bogotá participated in an exercise involving a simulated forest fire in which firefighters guided a helicopter equipped with a Bambi Bucket. During the training exercise, the pilot released water from the Bambi Bucket four times, using specific coordinates. For example, air base personnel help collect trash and recyclables in various ecologically important sites. Air Force personnel also participate in quarterly discussions and environmental awareness campaigns on subjects such as global warming, care and protection of the environment, reforestation, how to save water and use it efficiently, and the prevention of illegal trafficking in controlled species. The CAF also helps the civilian population by helping preserve and protect the environment. Strong ties to the civilian population The CAF uses a variety of equipment to help extinguish forest fires, such as an artificial pool with the capacity to store 10,000 gallons of water with retardant chemicals to fight fires. Its helicopter pilots also use a water carrier known as a Bambi Bucket, which can hold 900 liters, to drop on flames. The four days of training included theory lessons on meteorology, cartography, risk management, rescue equipment, fire extinguishing systems, and dangers during emergencies. The lessons were a prelude to practical exercises performed at the Luis F. Pinto Air Base in Melgar, Tolima Department. The Air Force “continues to develop significant projects in science and technology to develop multi-purpose aircraft and other maintenance projects, not only for defense but also for national integration through the aeronautical industry,” Martínez Poinsenet said. In addition to helping fight fires, the Air Force also trains civilian firefighters. Similarly, in March 2014, it responded quickly to forest fires that broke out in the municipality of Malambo, Atlántico Department. There, strong winds spread the fire quickly. “An example of this is the Eastern Air Group which, since 1996 (in Marandúa, Vichada), has been able to construct waste water treatment plants, potable water plants, water bottling plants, solid waste management plants, and has led public awareness campaigns and Project Marandúa,” said Col. Martínez Poinsenet. Project Marandúa focuses on the production and usage of air, water, and food. Since early January, the CAF has been cooperating with firefighters, the Colombian National Army, National Police, Red Cross, Civil Defense, Risk Management Unit, and local municipalities to stop forest fires in the departments of Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Boyacá, Santander, Risaralda, and Magdalena. The CAF also helped extinguish another fire in October covering nearly 100 hectares in Boyacá Department. They responded at the request of Mayor Pablo Solano and were able to protect the municipality of Floresta’s water sources. The CAF uses a variety of equipment to help extinguish forest fires, such as an artificial pool with the capacity to store 10,000 gallons of water with retardant chemicals to fight fires. Its helicopter pilots also use a water carrier known as a Bambi Bucket, which can hold 900 liters, to drop on flames. It has also helped the civilian population in a variety of other ways, according to retired Colonel Michel Martínez Poinsenet, from the Colombian Army’s Military Intelligence branch and a member of the Colombia chapter of the Security and Defense Network of Latin America (RESDAL). Ongoing training is a key component of the CAF’s mission to help fight fires. In January, the Air Force sent helicopters from the Fifth Air Combat Command to fight two of the most dangerous, active conflagrations on record in the country in Boyacá Department. The Army, National Police, Civil Defense, and other agencies also cooperated in fighting the Boyacá fires, using the National Disaster Prevention and Response System. For example, air base personnel help collect trash and recyclables in various ecologically important sites. Air Force personnel also participate in quarterly discussions and environmental awareness campaigns on subjects such as global warming, care and protection of the environment, reforestation, how to save water and use it efficiently, and the prevention of illegal trafficking in controlled species. Air Force firefighters train in the United States Previous FAC efforts to help fight fires The CAF also helps the civilian population by helping preserve and protect the environment. The four days of training included theory lessons on meteorology, cartography, risk management, rescue equipment, fire extinguishing systems, and dangers during emergencies. The lessons were a prelude to practical exercises performed at the Luis F. Pinto Air Base in Melgar, Tolima Department. In late January, 10 members participated in special training at the University of Texas Training Center, in Laredo. Specialized personnel such as chiefs of security operations, fire chiefs, and aeronautical firefighters attended the 10 days of training and acquired fundamental skills to face a real emergency in the event of an airplane fire. The sessions included simulations of fires and rescues, as well as international protocols for fires in turbines and airplanes. In January, the Air Force sent helicopters from the Fifth Air Combat Command to fight two of the most dangerous, active conflagrations on record in the country in Boyacá Department. The Army, National Police, Civil Defense, and other agencies also cooperated in fighting the Boyacá fires, using the National Disaster Prevention and Response System. Air Force trains with firefighters The second exercise concerned rescuing people trapped by forest fires. The exercise simulated rescuing people from an area that was difficult to access. The firefighters needed to signal to helicopter crews carrying a tow system the exact location to rescue the victims. The exercise ended with the successful extraction of the injured people. By Dialogo February 24, 2015 Volunteer firefighters from municipalities including Nilo, Tocaima, Anapoima, La Mesa, Mosquera, and Bogotá participated in an exercise involving a simulated forest fire in which firefighters guided a helicopter equipped with a Bambi Bucket. During the training exercise, the pilot released water from the Bambi Bucket four times, using specific coordinates. The second exercise concerned rescuing people trapped by forest fires. The exercise simulated rescuing people from an area that was difficult to access. The firefighters needed to signal to helicopter crews carrying a tow system the exact location to rescue the victims. The exercise ended with the successful extraction of the injured people. Since early January, the CAF has been cooperating with firefighters, the Colombian National Army, National Police, Red Cross, Civil Defense, Risk Management Unit, and local municipalities to stop forest fires in the departments of Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Boyacá, Santander, Risaralda, and Magdalena. Similarly, in March 2014, it responded quickly to forest fires that broke out in the municipality of Malambo, Atlántico Department. There, strong winds spread the fire quickly. For example, in early February, the Fourth Air Combat Command trained a group of volunteer firefighters from the Department of Cundinamarca in techniques to guide the aircraft that would support ground missions with a focus on increasing efforts in the event of forest fires, natural disasters, or catastrophes. Previous FAC efforts to help fight fires The Colombian Air Force (CAF) is playing an important role in fighting forest fires throughout the country. By helping to extinguish fires, the CAF has developed a close relationship with the civilian population. Air Force firefighters train in the United States The Colombian Air Force (CAF) is playing an important role in fighting forest fires throughout the country. CAF commanders deployed a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter, which was able to transport 600 gallons of water in a Bambi Bucket. Nearby water sources were too shallow to deploy the Bambi Bucket effectively, so the commander of the Third Air Combat Command at the time, Colonel David Barrero Barrero, sent a C-95 aircraft with a 5,000-gallon portable pool that could be filled by a tanker. Strong ties to the civilian population For example, in early February, the Fourth Air Combat Command trained a group of volunteer firefighters from the Department of Cundinamarca in techniques to guide the aircraft that would support ground missions with a focus on increasing efforts in the event of forest fires, natural disasters, or catastrophes. Fires have occurred in almost 80 percent of the country and have destroyed thousands of hectares, mostly virgin vegetation and natural forests, according to authorities. Some regions are particularly susceptible to fires because of the weather pattern known as El Niño, which can create warmer and drier than usual conditions in different parts of the world. “An example of this is the Eastern Air Group which, since 1996 (in Marandúa, Vichada), has been able to construct waste water treatment plants, potable water plants, water bottling plants, solid waste management plants, and has led public awareness campaigns and Project Marandúa,” said Col. Martínez Poinsenet. Project Marandúa focuses on the production and usage of air, water, and food. The CAF has played an important role in efforts to halt forest fires in Colombia in recent years. The CAF has played an important role in efforts to halt forest fires in Colombia in recent years. The Air Force “continues to develop significant projects in science and technology to develop multi-purpose aircraft and other maintenance projects, not only for defense but also for national integration through the aeronautical industry,” Martínez Poinsenet said.last_img read more

Recent Comments