Imprisoned women journalists and netizens risking death

first_img News Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists IranMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts RSF_en After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists November 6, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Imprisoned women journalists and netizens risking death Help by sharing this information News to go further Organisation center_img News Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 June 9, 2021 Find out more IranMiddle East – North Africa February 25, 2021 Find out more March 18, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders is very worried about the state of health of eight women prisoners of conscience who began a hunger strike five days ago in protest against inhuman and degrading jail conditions. They include three journalists and netizens – Mahssa Amrabadi, Jila Bani Yaghoob and Shiva Nazar Ahari.The women are the victims of reprisals by the authorities in response to a joint statement on 31 October by Nobel peace laureate Shirin Ebadi and six human rights organizations including Reporters Without Borders, which voiced concern about the situation of women prisoners of conscience in Tehran’s Evin prison.A few hours after the statement’s release, female guards raided the women’s wing of Evin prison and spent hours inspecting the detainees’ personal effects. After finding no forbidden items, the guards began to search the detainees in a degrading manner and to mistreat them.It was in response to this humiliating treatment that the eight women – who also include Nazanin Dihami, Bahareh Hedayat, Nasim Soltanbighi, Hakimeh Shokriand and Jila Karam Zadeh Makvandi – began their human strike.Nasrin Sotoudeh, a jailed human rights lawyer who defended several imprisoned journalists, was meanwhile transferred to Section 209, Evin prison’s security wing, on 31 October, five days after the European Parliament announced it was awarding her this year’s Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought. Sotoudeh, who has been on hunger strike since 17 October, was also forbidden to receive visits for three weeks.“The Iranian authorities, especially the Islamic Republic’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, are responsible for the health and safety of all their detainees and we will hold them responsible for anything that happens to these women prisoners of conscience,” Reporters Without Borders said.“These women are not just serving long jail terms but are now also being subjected to humiliating and degrading treatment in flagrant violation of national and international laws. The international community must not remain silent in the face of the Islamic Republic’s many atrocities in its prisons.”While supporting their fight for the right to information and freedom of expression, Reporters Without Borders urges these women prisoners to abandon their hunger strike for fear that they could die. Follow the news on Iranlast_img read more

Brazilian Minister of Defense Says Technology Transfer is Crucial in Closing Deals with Brazil

first_img Diálogo: How do you see the use of the Armed Forces in combating drug trafficking? Minister Wagner: In regards to the PROSUB, the technology being transferred concerns submarine building. The propulsion is national merit though; the merit of several generations of the Brazilian Navy which, over 30 years ago, believed that it was crucial to have this control over uranium enrichment, and the propulsion is ours. We are actually partnering with Argentina, where we will be sharing this knowledge for the production of drugs in the treatment of various diseases, so that’s why I say that the technology you bring in gets carried over to other segments. And that’s what interests us. Approximately 38,000 men will ensure the security of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The primary objective is prevention, according to information released by the Brazilian Ministry of Defense in March. The country should spend about 200 million dollars only on the event’s security between 2014 and the end of the Olympics, the Ministry said. Diálogo: What is LAAD’s importance to Brazil’s national security? To discuss this and other topics, Diálogo spoke with Brazilian Minister of Defense Jaques Wagner, during LAAD Defense & Security 2015 International Exhibition, the largest and most important trade show for the defense and security sectors in Latin America, which this year gathered over 700 exhibitors from 71 countries across three Riocentro pavilions in Rio de Janeiro, from April 14 to 17. Minister Wagner: In regards to the PROSUB, the technology being transferred concerns submarine building. The propulsion is national merit though; the merit of several generations of the Brazilian Navy which, over 30 years ago, believed that it was crucial to have this control over uranium enrichment, and the propulsion is ours. We are actually partnering with Argentina, where we will be sharing this knowledge for the production of drugs in the treatment of various diseases, so that’s why I say that the technology you bring in gets carried over to other segments. And that’s what interests us. Minister Wagner: I can tell you that Brazil intends to purchase materials and equipment, especially when it comes to the prevention of terrorist, cyber, chemical, biological, and nuclear attacks, as well as to avoid radioactive incidents. Minister Jaques Wagner: I would say that this expo is extremely important for the defense and national security industry. This is a growing industry throughout the world, in which Brazil has businesses that are becoming stronger. I would mention Embraer and the manufacturing of the KC-390 aircraft as examples, since it is about to be marketed. It is an industry that we have been developing. This industry brings technology and skills. This is part of the interest of our national development program, and therefore it is important because it showcases Brazil’s potential, builds partnerships, and – I would say– introduces innovation and technology, which will end up benefiting the domestic industry as a whole. Minister Wagner: The word “impede” is absolute, and I don’t like to use it, but evidently, in terms of the variables we use to pick a winner in any area, the technology transfer variable is among the most important ones, because we want a whole-package deal. I would rather not name countries that may have offered equipment that appeared more advantageous, but as far as a package deal, without disclosing the source code, without disclosure and transfer of technology, honestly, we are not interested. We have a democracy of over 200 million people, and we have a well-settled industrial base, and we want to fly higher, as opposed to being mere buyers. So, I would say that the technology transfer variable is one of extremely high importance when closing any Brazilian deal. Diálogo: Is that what tipped the scale in favor of Gripen? Diálogo: We have recently seen many protests against the federal government. What do you think of this kind of protest? Diálogo: In your opening speech for LAAD, you mentioned that technology transfer is crucial when it comes to closing deals with the Brazilian Armed Forces. Was the Gripen aircraft chosen over the United States’ F-18 for that reason, because the Swedes are willing to transfer technology? Does the absence of technology transfer automatically impede a country from closing a deal with the Brazilian Armed Forces? Diálogo: Are any technologies or equipment from LAAD 2015 being considered for use to that effect? Minister Wagner: In the case of the Gripen, yes. This was key, and also in the case of the PROSUB, our nuclear submarine. Evidently, there is always a counterpart, which is a Brazilian company, because the government is not the one that is going to absorb this technology, because we want this intelligence to stay in the country. So, in the case of the Gripen, we are sending 250 to 280 engineers to Sweden to complete this transfer process. Diálogo: In your opening speech for LAAD, you mentioned that technology transfer is crucial when it comes to closing deals with the Brazilian Armed Forces. Was the Gripen aircraft chosen over the United States’ F-18 for that reason, because the Swedes are willing to transfer technology? Does the absence of technology transfer automatically impede a country from closing a deal with the Brazilian Armed Forces? Minister Wagner: Yes. There will be a large investment on SISFRON, which, as I mentioned, is a border control technology that is in the process of being implemented. Minister Wagner: Just to clarify: this expo is about defense and security. I am not the most qualified person to speak strictly about security, but all the border control part, the SISFRON, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) issue, yes, of course there is the possibility of using what is being showcased in LAAD. There are many technologies. Today, when you watch your airspace, you are also watching for an aircraft that is flying without registering with our control system. When you guard a border, from the land or fluvial perspective, if you have a vessel that is traveling without being licensed by the Port Authority, all this can be used to detect and surprise a trafficking operation. We cannot remove ourselves from the drug trafficking issue. When you guard your airspace, your land, maritime, and river borders, of course you are creating obstacles for trafficking in weapons and drugs. Minister Jaques Wagner: I would say that this expo is extremely important for the defense and national security industry. This is a growing industry throughout the world, in which Brazil has businesses that are becoming stronger. I would mention Embraer and the manufacturing of the KC-390 aircraft as examples, since it is about to be marketed. It is an industry that we have been developing. This industry brings technology and skills. This is part of the interest of our national development program, and therefore it is important because it showcases Brazil’s potential, builds partnerships, and – I would say– introduces innovation and technology, which will end up benefiting the domestic industry as a whole. Diálogo: Is that what tipped the scale in favor of Gripen? Diálogo: We have recently seen many protests against the federal government. What do you think of this kind of protest? Minister Wagner: Understandably, the government continues to observe them with humility and tranquility. I think this is reason for an inner pride for Brazilians. Not all countries have the democratic maturity to handle street protests and corruption investigations that have affected many segments, and still maintain its institutional serenity and functionality. I think this is proof of the Brazilian democracy’s consistency. The government should attempt to respond to the people’s wishes, making adjustments that allow us to grow. Power is conquered by popular vote, but also lost by popular vote. The report overall is very interesting. It provides us with information about the technology we need to defend the country. Our defense minister, Jaques Wagner, is quite right about the transfer of technology. Could you imagine investing a fortune to buy equipment, and then have to depend on [technological] support from those who sold us the equipment? It would be absurd to accept buying under certain restrictions! Afterward, we would be at the mercy of the seller’s demands. Yes, we absolutely need to demand technology transfer. About the Technology Transfer policy, sensational and extremely sensible and mature for our Defense Ministry to say that “we are not interested in purchasing a package deal (…) that we are a democracy with over 200 million inhabitants, a very solid industrial base and we want to reach greater heights than being mere buyers. Because just as he says, “the technology that you bring will explode to other sectors. This is what interests us.”” – Brazil! Show your face! I want to see who pays for us to stay like this!” very good. instructive and up-to-date. Why is it when journalists interview military authorities, their salaries aren’t discussed? Far from reality. Signals Minister Wagner’s concern regarding security policy and combating drug trafficking. The Federal Police must thoroughly investigate and punish all corrupt individuals up to the Godfather of the Brazilian mafia, and put them all in jail. Thank you Globo network for allowing me to make a few simple comments. Have a good afternoon everyone. Much success to the journalists Brazil. A country that does not even have money for education cannot provide the luxury of hosting the World Cup and Olympics, spending 200 million dollars on security alone. We are already paying the cost of the World Cup. There will be more next year. THE ARMED FORCES ONLY SERVE FOR THIS AND NOTHING ELSE. PAY WHAT YOU OWE US. Jaques Wagner is actually one of the few thinking minds with logical reasoning. He will certainly help in many areas and contribute to a “turnaround” of the way things are with the worst corruption in the country. I like Minister Wagner’s points of view!! I think that a well structured and efficient Ministry of Defense would be very profitable for our country. A lot of work is needed to secure our riches and borders. To be honest, I think Wagner is a strong, wise, intelligent man who could make it to President in all humility. YES! It’s best not to ADOPT this article whether or not you like it.Read the text and know that it is written for Brazilians to feel sure of themselves.JOÃO RIBEIRO PADILHA: age 82. Monday, May 25, 2015 8:39 a.m. Is this minister innocent or malicious? Gen. Augusto Heleno once said very appropriately that something like “Technology Transfer” doesn’t exist. To understand a thesis, you need to at least understand it. A four year old in pre-school would never be able to understand a mathematical equation of a first year college student of Electronic Engineering. They may try to “transfer the know-how” to him, but he won’t get it. So, a Brazil that is out of place due to its declining academic quality is no longer even the country of the future. It is now the country of the past because it’s backwards. Congratulations on the interview. Striving to succeed with the 2016 Olympics in Brazil. It would be good for the country to think about the consequences ahead of time to successfully carry out its plan. I don’t think Argentina can be beat commercially and even less so in terms of the military. We are at the peak of our abilities. Diálogo: What about the PROSUB? Minister Wagner: I can tell you that Brazil intends to purchase materials and equipment, especially when it comes to the prevention of terrorist, cyber, chemical, biological, and nuclear attacks, as well as to avoid radioactive incidents. Diálogo: Brazil is going to invest heavily to ensure the security of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio. Could you tell us about investments in this area? Diálogo: What about the PROSUB? Diálogo: Brazil is going to invest heavily to ensure the security of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio. Could you tell us about investments in this area? Diálogo: Will there be investments on new technologies to combat organized transnational crime? Minister Wagner: Just to clarify: this expo is about defense and security. I am not the most qualified person to speak strictly about security, but all the border control part, the SISFRON, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) issue, yes, of course there is the possibility of using what is being showcased in LAAD. There are many technologies. Today, when you watch your airspace, you are also watching for an aircraft that is flying without registering with our control system. When you guard a border, from the land or fluvial perspective, if you have a vessel that is traveling without being licensed by the Port Authority, all this can be used to detect and surprise a trafficking operation. We cannot remove ourselves from the drug trafficking issue. When you guard your airspace, your land, maritime, and river borders, of course you are creating obstacles for trafficking in weapons and drugs. Minister Wagner: The fight against drug trafficking is directly linked to the Ministry of Justice, while border control is directly linked to the Ministry of Defense and the SISFRON [ Integrated border monitoring system], which falls mainly under the Brazilian Army’s responsibility, but is in fact a joint operation with the three forces. There is an interaction, especially in the border control area, and also when it comes to fluvial issues, as is the case with our internal borders with other South American countries. We have improved in regards to the exchange of information, and it is obvious that there is also an interaction with the Ministry of Justice, because we are facing a silent war, namely the traffic of drugs and weapons. To discuss this and other topics, Diálogo spoke with Brazilian Minister of Defense Jaques Wagner, during LAAD Defense & Security 2015 International Exhibition, the largest and most important trade show for the defense and security sectors in Latin America, which this year gathered over 700 exhibitors from 71 countries across three Riocentro pavilions in Rio de Janeiro, from April 14 to 17. By Dialogo April 27, 2015 Minister Wagner: The fight against drug trafficking is directly linked to the Ministry of Justice, while border control is directly linked to the Ministry of Defense and the SISFRON [ Integrated border monitoring system], which falls mainly under the Brazilian Army’s responsibility, but is in fact a joint operation with the three forces. There is an interaction, especially in the border control area, and also when it comes to fluvial issues, as is the case with our internal borders with other South American countries. We have improved in regards to the exchange of information, and it is obvious that there is also an interaction with the Ministry of Justice, because we are facing a silent war, namely the traffic of drugs and weapons. Minister Wagner: Understandably, the government continues to observe them with humility and tranquility. I think this is reason for an inner pride for Brazilians. Not all countries have the democratic maturity to handle street protests and corruption investigations that have affected many segments, and still maintain its institutional serenity and functionality. I think this is proof of the Brazilian democracy’s consistency. The government should attempt to respond to the people’s wishes, making adjustments that allow us to grow. Power is conquered by popular vote, but also lost by popular vote. Diálogo: Are any technologies or equipment from LAAD 2015 being considered for use to that effect? Diálogo: What is LAAD’s importance to Brazil’s national security? Diálogo: Will there be investments on new technologies to combat organized transnational crime? Minister Wagner: In the case of the Gripen, yes. This was key, and also in the case of the PROSUB, our nuclear submarine. Evidently, there is always a counterpart, which is a Brazilian company, because the government is not the one that is going to absorb this technology, because we want this intelligence to stay in the country. So, in the case of the Gripen, we are sending 250 to 280 engineers to Sweden to complete this transfer process. Minister Wagner: Yes. There will be a large investment on SISFRON, which, as I mentioned, is a border control technology that is in the process of being implemented. Approximately 38,000 men will ensure the security of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The primary objective is prevention, according to information released by the Brazilian Ministry of Defense in March. The country should spend about 200 million dollars only on the event’s security between 2014 and the end of the Olympics, the Ministry said. Minister Wagner: The word “impede” is absolute, and I don’t like to use it, but evidently, in terms of the variables we use to pick a winner in any area, the technology transfer variable is among the most important ones, because we want a whole-package deal. I would rather not name countries that may have offered equipment that appeared more advantageous, but as far as a package deal, without disclosing the source code, without disclosure and transfer of technology, honestly, we are not interested. We have a democracy of over 200 million people, and we have a well-settled industrial base, and we want to fly higher, as opposed to being mere buyers. So, I would say that the technology transfer variable is one of extremely high importance when closing any Brazilian deal. Diálogo: How do you see the use of the Armed Forces in combating drug trafficking? last_img read more

Pistorius fall-out: Nike moves to limit brand damage

first_img“I am the bullet in the chamber” ran the strapline for the Nike advert featuring Paralympic champion Oscar Pistorius.As the South African athlete faced charges of “premeditated murder” in a Pretoria courtroom following the shooting dead of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, his sponsors went into crisis-management mode.Nike swiftly pulled the unfortunately-worded ads, as the perils of celebrity brand endorsement were brought sharply into focus once again.Mr Pistorius, who has strongly rejected the murder charge, is thought to have earned several million pounds from sponsorships with Nike, BT, Thierry Mugler, Oakley, and Ossur, the Icelandic firm that makes the prosthetic carbon fibre blades he wears for races.But in the brutal world of sports sponsorship, the “Blade Runner” stands to lose everything, even presuming his innocence.When asked whether Nike was considering terminating Mr Pistorius’ sponsorship deal, thought to be worth about $2m, a spokesman told the BBC: “We are continuing to monitor the situation closely. It is a police matter.” Another of Mr Pistorius’ sponsors, M-Net Movies, a South African pay TV channel, pulled its TV ad campaign featuring the athlete, tweeting: “Out of respect and sympathy to the bereaved, M-Net will be pulling its entire Oscar campaign featuring Oscar Pistorius with immediate effect.”‘Damaged goods’John Taylor, director of a sports sponsorship company and a veteran of the industry, told the BBC: “Even if Pistorius is found innocent, he is damaged goods. Brands need to act quickly and distance themselves from him; they cannot afford to wait until the case is heard.“It’s not like rats deserting a sinking ship, it’s just the sensible thing to do.”Nigel Currie, director of sports marketing agency Brand Rapport, agrees, saying: “This is very different to the Tiger Woods and Lance Armstrong cases; this is life and death. There’s no coming back from this.”But none of his sponsors has yet formally broken links with the Olympic and Paralympic athlete, and most are remaining tight-lipped. Telecommunications group BT, which was recently shortlisted in the Best Sponsorship of a Sport Team or Individual category of the Sport Industry Awards 2013 for its campaign featuring Mr Pistorius, said: “Our thoughts are with all those affected by this tragedy. Given the ongoing legal proceedings, it would be inappropriate for us to comment further.”Fashion house Thierry Mugler, which chose Mr Pistorius as the face of its A*Men fragrance in 2011, said: “We have no comment at this stage.” And Ossur said it was “highly premature” to make any decisions regarding its relationship with him.Even his South African management agency was saying little on Friday. Peet van Zyl, joint managing director of In-Site Athlete Management, told the BBC: “Oscar has been my client for six years. It’s my business to know how much he earns in sponsorships, but we’re not in any position to give you any comment at the moment given the sensitivity of the situation.”Martial languageThe global sponsorship industry is worth an estimated $50bn (£32.2bn; 36.4bn euros) a year, according to consultancy IEG, with more than 80% of that being spent on sports. Nike, which makes annual revenues of over $24bn, spends tens of millions of dollars on sports sponsorships a year. For example, its recent sponsorship deal with Rory McIlroy, the Northern Irish golfer, will reportedly cost the company $100m to $125m (£62m to £77m) over five years.When its previous brand ambassador, golf titan Tiger Woods, was exposed as a philanderer in 2009, Nike stuck by him even though many other brands cast him adrift.“Nike’s whole golf proposition was built around him. They had spent millions of dollars and simply couldn’t afford to drop him”, says Alan Ferguson, managing director of The Sports Business, a sports marketing consultancy.Nike chooses sports stars that seem to embody and reinforce its high-energy brand. “My body is my weapon. This is how I fight,” says one video featuring Mr Pistorius and other South African athletes. Its 2012 annual report contained a headline: “We are on the offense. Always.”As Oscar Pistorius demonstrated values of tenacity, valour and triumph over adversity, it made him an obvious fit with the sportswear giant. But in the light of recent events, Mr Ferguson warns: “I think many brands will be taking stock and re-evaluating their celebrity endorsements now. At the very least they will be doing more detailed background checks on their sports stars.”Tattooed on Oscar Pistorius’ back is a quotation from St Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians (9: 26-27): “Therefore I run thus: not with uncertainty. Thus I fight: not as one who beats the air. But I discipline my body and bring it into subjection, lest, when I have preached to others, I myself should become disqualified.”In the unforgiving, hard cash world of sports sponsorship, Mr Pistorius could find himself being disqualified, whether innocent or guilty.last_img read more

CAF to rule on DR Congo no-show

first_imgThe Confederation of African Football, CAF, is expected to rule on the ‘No-Show’ by DR Congo’s U17 team for a 2014 FIFA U17 Women’s World Cup qualifier against Ghana.The Black Maidens reported at the Accra Sports Stadium on Sunday but their Congolese opponents failed to turn up.The match referee had to call off the match upon advice from the Beninois match commissioner Fafolahan Rachel.The Ghana Football is expecting the continental football governing body to rule in Ghana’s favor.Ibrahim Sannie Daara, spokesperson of the Ghana Football Association told JOY Sports “the match commissioner and the referees will have to present their reports stating clearly that our opponents did not turn up and CAF will apply its rules regarding teams that do not turn up for matches. I suspect from what we’ve seen in the past, there’s going to be a walk over for Ghana and then Congo will be banned from playing U17 matches for some time.”Head coach of the Black Maidens, Evans Adottey is “not disappointed at the turn of events. In all things give thanks for this is the will of God. I’m happy because we don’t know what could have happened. We will go and prepare very well for the next stage of the qualifiers.” In other news, Kenya also failed to turn up in their game against Equatorial Guinea therefore the Black Maidens are likely to meet Equatorial Guinea in their next game.Ghana is preparing to make a second consecutive appearance at the FIFA U17 World Cup to be played in Costa Rica in March next year.last_img read more

Recent Comments