Colombian Air Force Helps Fight Forest Fires

first_imgBy helping to extinguish fires, the CAF has developed a close relationship with the civilian population. In addition to helping fight fires, the Air Force also trains civilian firefighters. CAF commanders deployed a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter, which was able to transport 600 gallons of water in a Bambi Bucket. Nearby water sources were too shallow to deploy the Bambi Bucket effectively, so the commander of the Third Air Combat Command at the time, Colonel David Barrero Barrero, sent a C-95 aircraft with a 5,000-gallon portable pool that could be filled by a tanker. Fires have occurred in almost 80 percent of the country and have destroyed thousands of hectares, mostly virgin vegetation and natural forests, according to authorities. Some regions are particularly susceptible to fires because of the weather pattern known as El Niño, which can create warmer and drier than usual conditions in different parts of the world. Air Force trains with firefighters In late January, 10 members participated in special training at the University of Texas Training Center, in Laredo. Specialized personnel such as chiefs of security operations, fire chiefs, and aeronautical firefighters attended the 10 days of training and acquired fundamental skills to face a real emergency in the event of an airplane fire. The sessions included simulations of fires and rescues, as well as international protocols for fires in turbines and airplanes. It has also helped the civilian population in a variety of other ways, according to retired Colonel Michel Martínez Poinsenet, from the Colombian Army’s Military Intelligence branch and a member of the Colombia chapter of the Security and Defense Network of Latin America (RESDAL). Ongoing training is a key component of the CAF’s mission to help fight fires. The CAF also helped extinguish another fire in October covering nearly 100 hectares in Boyacá Department. They responded at the request of Mayor Pablo Solano and were able to protect the municipality of Floresta’s water sources. Volunteer firefighters from municipalities including Nilo, Tocaima, Anapoima, La Mesa, Mosquera, and Bogotá participated in an exercise involving a simulated forest fire in which firefighters guided a helicopter equipped with a Bambi Bucket. During the training exercise, the pilot released water from the Bambi Bucket four times, using specific coordinates. For example, air base personnel help collect trash and recyclables in various ecologically important sites. Air Force personnel also participate in quarterly discussions and environmental awareness campaigns on subjects such as global warming, care and protection of the environment, reforestation, how to save water and use it efficiently, and the prevention of illegal trafficking in controlled species. The CAF also helps the civilian population by helping preserve and protect the environment. Strong ties to the civilian population The CAF uses a variety of equipment to help extinguish forest fires, such as an artificial pool with the capacity to store 10,000 gallons of water with retardant chemicals to fight fires. Its helicopter pilots also use a water carrier known as a Bambi Bucket, which can hold 900 liters, to drop on flames. The four days of training included theory lessons on meteorology, cartography, risk management, rescue equipment, fire extinguishing systems, and dangers during emergencies. The lessons were a prelude to practical exercises performed at the Luis F. Pinto Air Base in Melgar, Tolima Department. The Air Force “continues to develop significant projects in science and technology to develop multi-purpose aircraft and other maintenance projects, not only for defense but also for national integration through the aeronautical industry,” Martínez Poinsenet said. In addition to helping fight fires, the Air Force also trains civilian firefighters. Similarly, in March 2014, it responded quickly to forest fires that broke out in the municipality of Malambo, Atlántico Department. There, strong winds spread the fire quickly. “An example of this is the Eastern Air Group which, since 1996 (in Marandúa, Vichada), has been able to construct waste water treatment plants, potable water plants, water bottling plants, solid waste management plants, and has led public awareness campaigns and Project Marandúa,” said Col. Martínez Poinsenet. Project Marandúa focuses on the production and usage of air, water, and food. Since early January, the CAF has been cooperating with firefighters, the Colombian National Army, National Police, Red Cross, Civil Defense, Risk Management Unit, and local municipalities to stop forest fires in the departments of Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Boyacá, Santander, Risaralda, and Magdalena. The CAF also helped extinguish another fire in October covering nearly 100 hectares in Boyacá Department. They responded at the request of Mayor Pablo Solano and were able to protect the municipality of Floresta’s water sources. The CAF uses a variety of equipment to help extinguish forest fires, such as an artificial pool with the capacity to store 10,000 gallons of water with retardant chemicals to fight fires. Its helicopter pilots also use a water carrier known as a Bambi Bucket, which can hold 900 liters, to drop on flames. It has also helped the civilian population in a variety of other ways, according to retired Colonel Michel Martínez Poinsenet, from the Colombian Army’s Military Intelligence branch and a member of the Colombia chapter of the Security and Defense Network of Latin America (RESDAL). Ongoing training is a key component of the CAF’s mission to help fight fires. In January, the Air Force sent helicopters from the Fifth Air Combat Command to fight two of the most dangerous, active conflagrations on record in the country in Boyacá Department. The Army, National Police, Civil Defense, and other agencies also cooperated in fighting the Boyacá fires, using the National Disaster Prevention and Response System. For example, air base personnel help collect trash and recyclables in various ecologically important sites. Air Force personnel also participate in quarterly discussions and environmental awareness campaigns on subjects such as global warming, care and protection of the environment, reforestation, how to save water and use it efficiently, and the prevention of illegal trafficking in controlled species. Air Force firefighters train in the United States Previous FAC efforts to help fight fires The CAF also helps the civilian population by helping preserve and protect the environment. The four days of training included theory lessons on meteorology, cartography, risk management, rescue equipment, fire extinguishing systems, and dangers during emergencies. The lessons were a prelude to practical exercises performed at the Luis F. Pinto Air Base in Melgar, Tolima Department. In late January, 10 members participated in special training at the University of Texas Training Center, in Laredo. Specialized personnel such as chiefs of security operations, fire chiefs, and aeronautical firefighters attended the 10 days of training and acquired fundamental skills to face a real emergency in the event of an airplane fire. The sessions included simulations of fires and rescues, as well as international protocols for fires in turbines and airplanes. In January, the Air Force sent helicopters from the Fifth Air Combat Command to fight two of the most dangerous, active conflagrations on record in the country in Boyacá Department. The Army, National Police, Civil Defense, and other agencies also cooperated in fighting the Boyacá fires, using the National Disaster Prevention and Response System. Air Force trains with firefighters The second exercise concerned rescuing people trapped by forest fires. The exercise simulated rescuing people from an area that was difficult to access. The firefighters needed to signal to helicopter crews carrying a tow system the exact location to rescue the victims. The exercise ended with the successful extraction of the injured people. By Dialogo February 24, 2015 Volunteer firefighters from municipalities including Nilo, Tocaima, Anapoima, La Mesa, Mosquera, and Bogotá participated in an exercise involving a simulated forest fire in which firefighters guided a helicopter equipped with a Bambi Bucket. During the training exercise, the pilot released water from the Bambi Bucket four times, using specific coordinates. The second exercise concerned rescuing people trapped by forest fires. The exercise simulated rescuing people from an area that was difficult to access. The firefighters needed to signal to helicopter crews carrying a tow system the exact location to rescue the victims. The exercise ended with the successful extraction of the injured people. Since early January, the CAF has been cooperating with firefighters, the Colombian National Army, National Police, Red Cross, Civil Defense, Risk Management Unit, and local municipalities to stop forest fires in the departments of Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Boyacá, Santander, Risaralda, and Magdalena. Similarly, in March 2014, it responded quickly to forest fires that broke out in the municipality of Malambo, Atlántico Department. There, strong winds spread the fire quickly. For example, in early February, the Fourth Air Combat Command trained a group of volunteer firefighters from the Department of Cundinamarca in techniques to guide the aircraft that would support ground missions with a focus on increasing efforts in the event of forest fires, natural disasters, or catastrophes. Previous FAC efforts to help fight fires The Colombian Air Force (CAF) is playing an important role in fighting forest fires throughout the country. By helping to extinguish fires, the CAF has developed a close relationship with the civilian population. Air Force firefighters train in the United States The Colombian Air Force (CAF) is playing an important role in fighting forest fires throughout the country. CAF commanders deployed a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter, which was able to transport 600 gallons of water in a Bambi Bucket. Nearby water sources were too shallow to deploy the Bambi Bucket effectively, so the commander of the Third Air Combat Command at the time, Colonel David Barrero Barrero, sent a C-95 aircraft with a 5,000-gallon portable pool that could be filled by a tanker. Strong ties to the civilian population For example, in early February, the Fourth Air Combat Command trained a group of volunteer firefighters from the Department of Cundinamarca in techniques to guide the aircraft that would support ground missions with a focus on increasing efforts in the event of forest fires, natural disasters, or catastrophes. Fires have occurred in almost 80 percent of the country and have destroyed thousands of hectares, mostly virgin vegetation and natural forests, according to authorities. Some regions are particularly susceptible to fires because of the weather pattern known as El Niño, which can create warmer and drier than usual conditions in different parts of the world. “An example of this is the Eastern Air Group which, since 1996 (in Marandúa, Vichada), has been able to construct waste water treatment plants, potable water plants, water bottling plants, solid waste management plants, and has led public awareness campaigns and Project Marandúa,” said Col. Martínez Poinsenet. Project Marandúa focuses on the production and usage of air, water, and food. The CAF has played an important role in efforts to halt forest fires in Colombia in recent years. The CAF has played an important role in efforts to halt forest fires in Colombia in recent years. The Air Force “continues to develop significant projects in science and technology to develop multi-purpose aircraft and other maintenance projects, not only for defense but also for national integration through the aeronautical industry,” Martínez Poinsenet said.last_img read more

YOUNG & DANGEROUS | Army: Half of NPA-Panay rebels underage

first_imgThere are an estimated 100 fighters inNPA-Panay’s southern and central fronts, said Batara. Montaño stressed that children, as“zones of peace”, should be protected and should not be, at any cost, exposedto the culture of violence. Batara also urged parents to bevigilant and protective of their children. The Commission on Human Rights (CHR)in Western Visayas said the recruitment of individuals below 18 years old forarmed struggle violates international and domestic laws. In July, a rebel who surrendered, KaAguila from Calinog, Iloilo, told the Army he was 15 years old when he wasrecruited to the NPA. His role was agaw armas (seizing firearms) from policemen. “That is why the recruitment of youthto be used as spies, couriers and guides of both the Armed Forces of the Philippineand the CPP-NPA is prohibited by law,” said Montaño. He urged students not to be fooled. “Broken promises led some of them tosurrender,” he revealed. According to Batara, the NPA recruitsyoungsters mostly in schools and far-flung barangays.center_img ILOILO City – Half or perhaps evenmajority of New People’s Army (NPA) cadres in Panay Island are below the legalage of 18, according to the Philippine Army. These underage fighters were luredinto joining the NPA by false promises, said Lieutenant Colonel Joel BenedictBatara, commander of the 61st Infantry Battalion (61IB). In July, the 3rd Infantry Division ofthe Philippine Army discovered that NPA-Panay’s Eastern Front recruitedchildren aged 10 to 14. He decided to surrender due toconstant hunger and the failed promise of their leaders of a monthly salary ofP5,000. The International Humanitarian Law(IHL) states that youngsters 15 years old and up can join the armed movementbut Republic Act (RA) 7610 provides “stronger deterrence and special protectionagainst child abuse, exploitation, and discrimination” and disallows personsbelow 18 to join the armed movement. RA 7610 stipulates that “childrenshall not be an object of attack and shall be entitled to special respect. Theyshall be protected from any form of threat, assault, torture or other cruel,inhuman or degrading treatment.” Although the CHR Region 6 has notreceived any formal report on the recruitment of minors in the armed conflict,Christopher Montaño, information officer of CHR-6, said: “In the GenevaConvention and our domestic laws, recruiting minors in the armed conflict is aviolation because children should never be involved in armed conflictsituations.” “Mostly they recruit minors aged 10 to14. This is alarming because these minors are supposed to be attending school.The rebels are ruining their future,” said Lieutenant Hazel Durotan,Civil-Military Operations (CMO) officer of the Army’s 61st Infantry Battalion. (With a report from the Philippine NewsAgency/PN)last_img read more

Atchison County’s Tag Team Challenge now April 17

first_imgATCHISON, Kan. ­– The Tag Team Challenge special, newly-sanctioned Atchison County Race­way’s first event for Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds and IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, will be held Sunday, April 17.IMCA Modifieds race for $1,000 to win in their Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifier while IMCA Stock Cars have a top check of $750.Extra money – $1,000 for the Modifieds and $500 for the Stock Cars – will be paid to the two-car teams with top point totals determined from qualifying and main event finishes.IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, regional and Allstar Performance State points, but not local track points, will be awarded.Pit gates and the grandstand open at 4 p.m. Hot laps are 6:30 p.m. and racing is at 7 p.m. There is no entry fee and pit passes are $30.Grandstand admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and military, $6 for kids ages 6-11 and free for ages five and under.More information about the Tag Team Challenge, postponed from this weekend because of cool temperatures, is available by calling 913 370-2520.First local track points will be given at Atchison on Friday, April 29.last_img read more

New students from India at USC decrease

first_imgThe number of students from India at USC declined from fall 2010 to fall 2011, following a growing trend at universities across the nation.India ranked fourth among the top geographic areas outside the United States for USC enrollment with 1,265 students from India enrolled at USC, which represents a 15 percent decrease over the last academic year, according to the Office of International Services.This year there was a 1 percent drop in the number of students from India currently enrolled at universities in the United States. Students from India comprise 14.4 percent of international college students in the United States, which remains the most sought after destination for Indian students, according to the 2011 Open Doors annual survey by the United States International Institute of Education.Jaynit Raheja, a freshman majoring in business administration, said the high cost of education in the United States is discouraging students from India to study abroad. The average annual cost of private university education in India is $3,620, according to the Indian Ministry for Human Resource Development. The average annual tuition at a four-year private university in the United States is $36,000, according to the College Board.“The cost of education in the [United States] is way higher than it is in India. Hence, many students are choosing to stay back and then study abroad for their post-grad degrees,” Raheja said.The most common major for Indian students is engineering. More than 36 percent of Indian students are pursuing careers in these fields because of cultural values based on science and math-based education, according to the Open Doors survey.Tony Tambascia, executive director of the Office of International Services, said the university’s increased presence in India, including the opening of a new office in Mumbai this year, will help reverse the current decline in enrollment of Indian students.“USC has a strong history of enrolling students from India, as well as some key partnerships with institutions in that country. And recently USC has increased our presence in India, specifically by establishing a new office in Mumbai, as well as increased recruiting by admission staff,” Tambascia said. “These efforts will help the university maintain its position as a leading destination for some of the best students from India.”Raheja said despite a decrease in the number of students from India enrolled at the university, attending USC is still a valuable experience.“USC enables Indians to gain exposure to and respect different cultures while still being in touch with their own culture,” Raheja said. “Life in India is very family oriented; studying at USC has allowed me to become a part of a new family, the Trojan Family.”last_img read more

West Demerara man gets 18 years for statutory rape of teen

first_img…says he thought victim was 17Thirty-eight-year-old Dhanraj Persaud, of West Bank Demerara (WBD), who had an unlawful relationship with a teenage girl was on Wednesday jailed for 18 years after the court rejected his claim of believing the girl was 17 at the time.Jailed: Dhanraj PersaudThis comes nearly one month after a 12-member jury found him guilty of raping the then 15-year-old at a WBD village.His sentence was handed down by Justice JoAnn Barlow at the Sexual Offences Court. He learnt his fate following the reading of a probation report that his attorney, Maxwell McKay had requested.In that very report, Persaud outlined that he and the victim were involved in a relationship and he thought her real age was 17. He held out that the victim told him that she was 17.The court, however, found that Persaud knew the girl since she was about 10 years old, growing up in the community. Through her victim impact statement, the teen told the court that she was living in a waking nightmare as a result of what happened to her, further saying that her pain has contributed to her having frequent suicidal thoughts. She asked that Persaud be punished for his crime. Persaud, then 33, committed the act on October 23, 2013, in the county of Demerara.Justice Barlow ordered the offender to utilise programmes available in prison for sexual offenders. Persaud was said to have dropped out of school in Grade Six (Primary Four) and soon after, he started to work as a labourer.State Counsels Tiffini Lyken, Seeta Bishundial and Abigail Gibbs prosecuted the case.last_img read more