Five things we learned about the Raiders Wednesday

first_imgFor complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard.Five things we learned Wednesday as the Raiders began preparations to face the Denver Broncos in Week 2:1) Derek Carr feels the heat — but not until after he gets burned.Chatter is rampant that the Raiders’ quarterback has happy feet. Having sustained a broken finger, a broken leg and a fractured transverse process in his back, everyone with a remote, a Twitter account or a call-in number for talk radio has diagnosed Carr doesn’t …last_img read more

Warriors’ Damian Jones injured against Pistons, surgery could sideline him for the season

first_imgDETROIT – The Warriors’ young docile center sat on a bench and appeared relaxed. That only masked the frustration Damian Jones admittedly felt about his current circumstances.Jones had an MRI that revealed a torn left pectoral muscle suffered in Saturday’s game against Detroit, an injury that will both require surgery and could sideline him for the remainder of the 2018-19 season. Jones plans to fly to Chicago this week for the procedure.“We don’t know how long yet, but it’s going to be a …last_img read more

Seattle Mariners blast Chris Bassitt, Oakland Athletics 6-3

first_imgSEATTLE — Two home runs of two very different varieties, hit two batters apart and landed within feet of each other. Both tacked two runs on the board and put the A’s in a hole they would not climb out of in a 6-3 loss to the Mariners.Daniel Vogelbach got Seattle on the board in the fourth inning with a two-run moonshot into the right-field seats, and Kyle Seager followed two batters later with a laser to nearly the same spot.Starting pitcher Chris Bassitt never recovered and was yanked with …last_img read more

Prospect makes highly-anticipated debut in Athletics win over the Astros

first_imgHOUSTON — The A’s beat the Astros, 5-3, on Wednesday at Minute Maid Park ion what turned out to be a big night for Oakland’s top pitching prospect.Jesús Luzardo, one of the top pitching prospects in all of baseball, made his big-league debut. He dealt three innings, striking out two and allowing just one hit and one run — Martin Maldonado’s homer. Luzardo, 21, was in line to be on the Opening Day roster until a shoulder strain cost him the first two months of the season. His return to the …last_img read more

NFL Picks, Week 2: 49ers stay on road to success, Raiders lose encore

first_imgLong story short, here are my Week 2 picks, updated with point spreads. As for my opening week, it’s a reminder that picking against the spread (7-9-1) is harder than straight-up calls (12-3-1):49ers 24, Bengals 20: Back-to-back road wins make the 49ers 2-0 for the first time since 2012. … Last time they had a week-long layover in Youngstown, Ohio: 2012. … Last time they went to the Super Bowl: 2012. … Last time I hype up that, until next week. Line: 49ers -1 1/2Chiefs 35, Raiders 17: From …last_img read more

TRUETAPE Supertape Roll 3/4″ Wide X 12yd, Great stuff. Recommend this to all sound recordists

first_imgSummaryReviewer Nathalie DuboisReview Date2018-04-09 12:51:11Reviewed Item Supertape Roll 3/4″ Wide X 12ydRating 5.0 / 5  stars, based on  5  reviewsPrice£27.99 We use this product in our small. We use this product in our small theatre to hold hair pieces, wigs, false moustaches, side burns etc. We’ve even used it as emergency repair for curtains, costumes etc. This is a tape you can rely on. Recommend this to all sound recordists. I use this tape for attaching personal microphones to people’s clothing and skin. It’s the only toupee tape i found that stays in place for an entire shoot day. Recommend this to all sound recordists. We use this product in our small. We use this product in our small theatre to hold hair pieces, wigs, false moustaches, side burns etc. We’ve even used it as emergency repair for curtains, costumes etc. This is a tape you can rely on. Key specs for Supertape Roll 3/4″ Wide X 12yd:STRONGEST Extended Wear Bonding Tape available worldwideBonds to Lace, Monofilament material and Polyurethane tape-tab areasSUPERTAPETM is waterproofComments from buyers“This really is SUPER tape. We use this product in our small , Great stuff. Recommend this to all sound recordists” Recommend this to all sound recordists. I use this tape for attaching personal microphones to people’s clothing and skin. It’s the only toupee tape i found that stays in place for an entire shoot day. Recommend this to all sound recordists. Recommend this to all sound recordists. I use this tape for attaching personal microphones to people’s clothing and skin. It’s the only toupee tape i found that stays in place for an entire shoot day. Recommend this to all sound recordists. We use this product in our small. We use this product in our small theatre to hold hair pieces, wigs, false moustaches, side burns etc. We’ve even used it as emergency repair for curtains, costumes etc. This is a tape you can rely on. We use this product in our small. We use this product in our small theatre to hold hair pieces, wigs, false moustaches, side burns etc. We’ve even used it as emergency repair for curtains, costumes etc. This is a tape you can rely on. Recommend this to all sound recordists. I use this tape for attaching personal microphones to people’s clothing and skin. It’s the only toupee tape i found that stays in place for an entire shoot day. Recommend this to all sound recordists. Recommend this to all sound recordists. I use this tape for attaching personal microphones to people’s clothing and skin. It’s the only toupee tape i found that stays in place for an entire shoot day. Recommend this to all sound recordists. We use this product in our small. We use this product in our small theatre to hold hair pieces, wigs, false moustaches, side burns etc. We’ve even used it as emergency repair for curtains, costumes etc. This is a tape you can rely on. Recommend this to all sound recordists. I use this tape for attaching personal microphones to people’s clothing and skin. It’s the only toupee tape i found that stays in place for an entire shoot day. Recommend this to all sound recordists. Recommend this to all sound recordists. I use this tape for attaching personal microphones to people’s clothing and skin. It’s the only toupee tape i found that stays in place for an entire shoot day. Recommend this to all sound recordists. Recommend this to all sound recordists. I use this tape for attaching personal microphones to people’s clothing and skin. It’s the only toupee tape i found that stays in place for an entire shoot day. Recommend this to all sound recordists. We use this product in our small. We use this product in our small theatre to hold hair pieces, wigs, false moustaches, side burns etc. We’ve even used it as emergency repair for curtains, costumes etc. This is a tape you can rely on. We use this product in our small. We use this product in our small theatre to hold hair pieces, wigs, false moustaches, side burns etc. We’ve even used it as emergency repair for curtains, costumes etc. This is a tape you can rely on. We use this product in our small. We use this product in our small theatre to hold hair pieces, wigs, false moustaches, side burns etc. We’ve even used it as emergency repair for curtains, costumes etc. This is a tape you can rely on. last_img read more

OKC has ‘to play together’ to make things easier for ‘freak’ Westbrook

first_imgOKC’s Steven Adams and former NBA coach Reggie Theus during the opening of the NBA 3x in the Philippines.Oklahoma City center Steven Adams said there’s no one way to slow down Russell Westbrook’s frantic style of play and what they can do is to make things easier for their prized MVP.“The only way to lessen Russell’s workload is that everyone plays together, but it’s really not draining on Russ, he’s just a freak right,” said Adams during the opening ceremony of the NBA 3X Philippines at Mall of Asia Music Hall on Saturday.ADVERTISEMENT Westbrook is the second player to average a triple-double for a season after Oscar Robertson as he put up 31.6 points, 10.7 points, and 10.4 assists en route to his first MVP award.Those numbers, however, came through Oklahoma relying too much on Westbrook as the 6-foot-3 point guard led the league in usage rate.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsAs per basketball-reference.com, Westbrook had a usage rate of 41.7 percent, which was the highest in the league.The next most used player in the OKC roster is Adams whose usage rate is at 16.2%. National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress LATEST STORIES Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’center_img Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant View comments Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet And even though OKC just got four-time All Star Paul George, Adams doesn’t see Westbrook would try to slow his game down.The best the Thunder can do, Adams said, is to make George feel welcome in a franchise that already lost its former cornerstone in Kevin Durant.“All we got to do is make him feel welcome, make sure he’s comfortable and the rest comes down to working hard and getting better,” said Adams. “The team has to do the right things to make everyone’s job easier.”ADVERTISEMENT FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Phoenix slips past Alaska on buzzer beater from Phelps Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

SA vs Ban: India in quarters as SA beat Bangladesh

first_imgSouth Africa beat Bangladesh by a massive 206 runs in their final group B match of the World Cup at the Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium in Dhaka on Saturday. ScoreTheir win not only helped the Proteas finish on top of the table with 10 points in six matches, but even helped Group B rivals India, England and West Indies secure a place in the quarter-finals.South Africa’s win means India and England are also assured of quarterfinal places. West Indies can advance if it avoids a heavily lopsided defeat to India at Chennai on Sunday. Bangladesh’s only hope of advancing is for the West Indies to slump to a heavy defeat and fall behind on the net run-rate for the tournament. Both teams are on six points.Chasing a stiff victory target of 285, Bangladesh were shot out for a paltry 78 in 28 overs. This was Bangladesh’s second score of less than 100 after they were bowled out for 58 against West Indies in an earlier group league game.After their 284 for eight in 50 overs was aided by three half-centuries from Hashim Amla (51), Jacques Kallis (69) and Francois du Plessis (52), Lonwabo Tsotsobe (3/14) blazed through the top-order, picking up Tamim Iqbal (5), Imrul Kayes (4) and Shahriar Nafees (5) before Smith took a great low catch off Robin Peterson’s first ball to dismiss Mushfiqur Rahim (3) as the Tigers plunged to 36 for five in the 16th over.The procession was ongoing and while the crowd sarcastically cheered the team crossing 58 (their score against West Indies), the hopes of a fight ended when skipper Shakib Al Hasan edged one to Morne van Wyk for 30.advertisementShakib’s 30 was the only double-digit score of the innings, Peterson picking up three wickets as the Tigers were crushed out for only 78 all out in 28 overs.Tsotsobe’s first spell ensured that Proteas comfortably topped the group B with 10 points from six games.South Africa’s batting was a proficient routine. Amla, Kallis and Du Plessis picking up solid half-centuries and just as the Bangladesh bowlers almost got the run flow under control, Robin Peterson and Johan Botha snatched away that glimmer of hope with a flurry of boundaries towards the end.But it was the Graeme Smith-Amla opening partnership that laid the foundation for the big score on a slow and low track.The two put on 98 for the first wicket, Smith coming back to some form with his steady 45 off 68 balls. There was hardly a ball that found the edge or beat the bat with Shakib desperately shifting his bowlers in a bid to unsettle the pair early on.Mahmudullah Riyad, the off-spinner, had Smith stumped in the 21st over with Amla following in the next over bowled by left-arm spinner Abdur Razzak.The fluent knock by Amla had some attractive cover drives, the right-hander making 51 off 59 balls with the help of six boundaries. .After Jean-Paul Duminy gloved one to wicketkeeper Rahim, Kallis and Du Plessis added 87 for the fifth wicket before both batsmen fell early during the third Powerplay.Kallis was his typical classic self, hammering five boundaries and a six in his 76-ball knock of 69.Du Plessis too played a solid hand, making a run-a-ball 52 with the help of a six and four boundaries, the two making way for Peterson to smash four boundaries in a short time during his 9-ball 22.For Bangladesh, Rubel Hossain took three for 56 while Shakib picked up two wickets and there was one each for Razzak and Riyad.With Agency inputslast_img read more

Hugh McIlvanney obituary

first_imgThe Observer Topics Sunday Times Reuse this content Anyone who sat alongside McIlvanney at the multitude of world title fights he covered would confirm he suffered over facts to the point of maddening intrusion. “Excuse me for interrupting, wee man,” he began one such whispered inquiry while Mike Tyson was telling us how he was going to rip Bruno’s head from his shoulders in their world title rematch in Las Vegas in 1996, “but Ingemar Johansson, is it with one S or two?”McIlvanney brought a breathtaking level of comprehension and expertise to his work without the benefit – or encumbrance, he might say – of a university education. He did not need paper to lend weight to his words. He was his own toughest examiner. It became obvious watching him at close quarters that the perfection he admired in others who strove for it, from Gabriel García Márquez to Muhammad Ali, was buried in his own soul from a young age. He was born in the Ayrshire town of Kilmarnock to William, a miner, and his wife, Helen (nee Montgomery), parents who gave him, his sister and two brothers, one of whom was the future crime writer William McIlvanney, a priceless grounding in the arts of expression. Hugh began on his hometown paper, the Kilmarnock Standard, after impressing during a debate at his school, the Kilmarnock academy, and moved briefly to the Scottish office of the Daily Express before joining the Scotsman. That newspaper’s outstanding editor, Alastair Dunnett, introduced him to the collected essays of AJ Liebling, perhaps the pivotal intervention in his long career. McIlvanney had not even considered becoming a sportswriter, but that moment fixed the path of his calling.To his surprise McIlvanney loved Liebling’s defining book on boxing, The Sweet Science. Like the New Yorker with the Sorbonne education, he was originally an accidental tourist in the under-lit suburb of sport. “I was a bit reluctant at the start,” he admitted. He was petrified of ending up “a fitba writer” obsessing about Celtic and Rangers. Self-doubt did not often haunt him thereafter.While his heart never left Scotland, the core of McIlvanney’s working life was played out on the pages of the Observer, where he began work in 1962 as deputy sports editor. In surroundings that were unremittingly Dickensian, peopled by literary mavericks to whom he would quickly cleave, McIlvanney impressed. But he knew that his editing and subediting work was no more than an entree to a more fulfilling line as a writer. He had a piece in the paper within a fortnight and there was no doubt he had found his metier. His style, he accepted, had an undeniable Scottish flavour to it. “I think it can be said without pomposity,” he wrote, while straying in that very direction, “that I have a recognisable voice in my writing. I would be surprised if there wasn’t some Scottishness there, and certainly an attitude to language. The feeling that you could be quite strongly expressive and still very accurate relates in a way to how I was brought up, listening to a lot of people who were very eloquent – although they might not have been very well educated, but who had a great respect for language, especially in the west of Scotland.”Allied to his great style was McIlvanney’s huge admiration for the characters of sport, and he never lost faith in his heroes, however flawed. Nobody gave George Best more rope. And Ali stood tallest for him, even when palsied after a boxing career that lingered too long. There was no doubt in McIlvanney’s mind that Muhammad (as he insisted on calling him) was The Greatest, as a human being and an athlete.“His boxing was totally idiosyncratic,” he said, “and technically at a level much lower than that of Sugar Ray Robinson. Muhammad was in a sense the eternal amateur, but he was God’s amateur, because the will was so magical, the imagination so magical, that he found a way to beat people.”It was the perfect metaphor for McIlvanney’s career: the raw yet refined genius from the north who invariably finished in front, sometimes despite himself. His writing – his reporting, as he would have it – was a triumph of the imagination.He is survived by his third wife, Caroline (nee North), whom he married in 2014, and by two children, Conn and Elizabeth, from his first marriage, to Sarah Kenmuir. It ended in divorce, as did his second marriage, to Sophie.• Hugh McIlvanney, journalist, born 2 February 1934; died 24 January 2019• Due to an editing error, an earlier version of this article said Hugh McIlvanney had three brothers. He had a sister and two brothers. The article was corrected on 26 January 2019. Share on LinkedIn Since you’re here… Sign up to the Media Briefing: news for the news-makers Read more Newspapers & magazines Hugh McIlvanney, doyen of sportswriting, dies aged 84 … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Newspapers Sport and journalism in the UK could not have asked for a better champion than the man who insisted he was a reporter rather than a “writer”, a title he felt conveyed too much grandiloquence in the circles in which he moved easily, from ringside to the track and, when the mood took him, the bar.His searing intelligence and an old-fashioned regard for accuracy, embroidered by a gift for verbal musicality, lifted his work to sometimes operatic heights. Others might have been more concise; none was more precise. He cared with monk-like zeal about the layered subtext of his narrative, as well as hitting the right tone and rhythm in his prose, and packaged it all as Beethoven might put together a symphony. If his work was too labyrinthine for some tastes, perhaps the fault lay with the listener rather than the composer.Always at the forefront of his thinking was accuracy, and he would not compromise the truth for a soft landing with celebrity athletes. He once wrote of an underwhelming performance by the British heavyweight Frank Bruno: “[He] was no more competitive than a sheep in an abattoir.” Cruel, certainly – but, in context, on the money.Honesty was his shotgun, and he fired it without fear or favour. “How many caps have you got?” the venerated England manager Sir Alf Ramsey asked him after he had criticised the team’s performance. “None,” McIlvanney replied, adding, “but if I send a turnip around the world, it doesn’t return an expert on geography.” The boxing promoter Harry Levene once demanded to know why McIlvanney was “flogging a dead horse” by complaining about the quality of a useless Canadian heavyweight imported to stand politely in front of local hero Billy Walker. “Why put a dead horse under starter’s orders?” came the counterpunch. Guardian Media Group Hugh McIlvanney’s life as a sports journalist resembled one of his perfectly crafted sentences: long, lyrical and rich with surprises. He was a scrupulous and perceptive witness to what he regarded with reverence as the “magnificent triviality” of sport, and his death, at the age of 84, will be the more keenly felt in a climate of concern about the dwindling integrity of the printed word. He leaves behind a fading image of an era that was more forgiving of boisterous behaviour than the one from which he retired in 2016 after nearly 60 years of excellence.There might be dissenting, scattered voices, but the consensus among his peers was that McIlvanney was the best sportswriter of his era. It is hard to find argument with that conclusion. His friend and rival, Ian Wooldridge, pushed him close – and was probably more willing to cede first place to him than McIlvanney was the other way around – while near contemporaries such as Dudley Doust and James Lawton kept him honest. Now they are all gone, Lawton only last September.During 30 years at the Observer and a concluding stint of 23 years at the Sunday Times, McIlvanney accumulated a swag of accolades at home and abroad: journalist of the year on a brief sabbatical from sport, when he returned to hard news for the Daily Express at the height of the Troubles in Northern Ireland; sports journalist of the year seven times; made OBE in 1996; a lifetime achievement award at the Scottish Press Awards in 2004; and induction into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2009. Read more Share on Twitter Sport Share via Email Share on Facebook Support The Guardian obituaries Share on Pinterest Share on Messenger Share on WhatsApp National newspaperslast_img read more

Ontario man arrested in US for disturbing flight crew

first_imgALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A Canadian man is facing charges in the U.S. for allegedly interfering with crew members and attendants while on a flight from Ohio to Los Angeles.The FBI say in a statement that 49-year-old Ian Stewart Smallwood of Ontario was taken into custody after the plane was diverted to Albuquerque.It was not immediately clear if Smallwood had an attorney.The charge stems from Dec. 21 when, according to a criminal complaint made public this week, Smallwood was accused of being verbally belligerent during the flight.He allegedly intimidated one of the flight attendants while she was preparing service in the galley at the front of the plane.Other passengers were also seen out of their seats, asking Smallwood to move out of the way and sit down.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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