9 months agoEverton take Idrissa Gueye off market

first_imgEverton take Idrissa Gueye off marketby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton have taken Idrissa Gueye off the market.A target for PSG, it had been claimed Everton would be willing to sell the midfielder for a set price of €45m.However, Foot Mercato says Everton have informed the player’s agent that Gueye is not for sale this month.Indeed, it’s been revealed Everton and PSG have broken off negotiations for the past week. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

17 days agoReal Sociedad midfielder Odegaard: Real Madrid in regular contact

first_imgReal Sociedad midfielder Odegaard: Real Madrid in regular contactby Carlos Volcano17 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Sociedad midfielder Martin Odegaard says parent club Real Madrid are in regular contact.The Norwegian has revealed that Los Blancos are content with his performances so far this season and they have sent him congratulatory messages.”I am in contact with Real Madrid, as sometimes they write to me to tell me how they see me,” he told Eurosport Norway.”They have congratulated me and praised my good start in the league.”They have told me that they are happy with me.”Odegaard went on to express his desire to see out his two-year loan agreement with the Basque side, before returning to the Estadio Santiago Bernabeu.”The idea is to respect [the loan deal],” he said.”I am happy at the team, and so I want to continue here until my two years end.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Keppel Confirms Receiving Summons in New EIG Lawsuit

first_imgzoom Singapore-based shipbuilder Keppel Offshore and Marine Limited (KOM) has been served with a summons within a civil action lawsuit filed by the eight funds managed by EIG Management Company (EIG) before the New York District Court for alleged racketeering.“This new lawsuit comes after an earlier civil action commenced by EIG and eight of its managed funds in the United States District Court, District of Columbia against, among others, the company and KOM was dismissed on March 30, 2017,” Keppel Corporation said on Wednesday.EIG launched the first legal case in 2016 on the grounds of an alleged conspiracy that led to EIG’s investment of USD 221 million in Sete Brasil Participacoes SA, a drillship contractor from Brazil which was involved in a bribery scheme with Petrobras and Keppel.The new lawsuit was filed pursuant to the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) and is said to be targeting USD 660 million in compensation claims.The case is linked to the bribery scheme KOM was embroiled in related to the Brazilian failed drillship venture.In order to settle the bribery charges in the United States, Brazil and Singapore, Keppel Offshore & Marine agreed to pay a penalty of over USD 422 million in December 2017.The settlement brought closure to the investigations into one decade-long corrupt payments made by a former Brazil-based agent of KOM.As disclosed by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) in December, KOM and its US subsidiary KOM USA paid over USD 50 million in bribes to Brazilian officials, which secured the companies USD 350 million of profit.Specifically, payments were made to officials of Brazilian state-run oil company, Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (Petrobras), and other parties, in order to win contracts with Petrobras and/or its related companies, the DOJ investigation found.Keppel Corporation said that the new lawsuit was without merit and that KOM would “vigorously defend itself”.Further updates on the matter would be provided when available, the company added.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Girls A No Ceilings Conversation With Hillary and Chelsea Clinton

first_imgOn Thursday April 17th, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton will host Girls: A No Ceilings Conversation – the first in a series of No Ceilings Conversation events designed to provide a forum to hear from girls and women around the world.Moderated by actress and advocate America Ferrera, Girls: A No Ceilings Conversation will bring together girls to talk about their lives, experiences, and hopes for the future.Taking place at the Lower Eastside Girls Club in New York City, the conversation will join girls from the Girls Club, the Girl Scouts of the USA, Girls Inc., Girl Up, the Young Women’s Leadership Network and four schools from across the country on Microsoft’s Skype Software: Seattle Girls’ School in Seattle, Washington; the Hathaway Brown School for Girls in Shaker Heights, Ohio; The York County School District in York, Virginia; and the KIPP Delta High School in Helena, Arkansas. The conversation, powered by Microsoft, will be streamed to allow people from around the world to join the conversation remotely and ask questions via online video streaming and Twitter.This conversation is part of the Clinton Foundation’s initiative, No Ceilings: The Full Participation Project, which seeks to advance the full participation of women and girls around the world. These conversations and the ones to follow will be used to shape and inform the work of No Ceilings.WHAT: Girls: A No Ceilings ConversationWHO: Hillary Rodham Clinton, Chelsea Clinton, and America FerreraWHEN: Thursday, April 17, 20143:00pmWHERE: Lower Eastside Girls Club402 East 8th Street (Enter at East 8th Street just West of Avenue D) New York, NY 10009last_img read more

Amazon says it received 238 proposals for 2nd headquarters

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – Amazon said today that it received 238 proposals from cities and regions in the United States, Canada and Mexico hoping to be the home of the company’s second headquarters.The online retailer kicked off its hunt for a second home base in September, promising to bring 50,000 new jobs and spend more than $5 billion on construction.Proposals were due last week, and Amazon made clear that tax breaks and grants would be a big deciding factor on where it chooses to land.Amazon.com Inc. did not list which cities or metro areas applied, but said the proposals came from 43 U.S. states, as well as Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico, three Mexican states and six Canadian provinces.Toronto, Montreal, Edmonton, Halifax and Calgary are some of the Canadian cities that submitted proposals.Besides looking for financial incentives, Amazon had stipulated that it was seeking to be near a metropolitan area with more than a million people; be able to attract top technical talent; be within 45 minutes of an international airport; have direct access to mass transit; and be able to expand that headquarters to more than 740,000 square metres in the next decade.Generous tax breaks and other incentives can erode a city’s tax base. For the winner, it could be worth it, since an Amazon headquarters could draw other tech businesses and their well-educated, highly paid employees.In New Jersey, Republican Gov. Chris Christie has endorsed Newark’s bid, saying the state and the city are planning nearly $7 billion in tax breaks. Detroit bid organizers have said its proposal offers Amazon the unique chance to set up shop in both the U.S. and Canada. Missouri officials proposed an innovation corridor between Kansas City and St. Louis rather than a single location.The seven U.S. states that Amazon said did not apply were: Arkansas, Hawaii, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming.Ahead of the deadline, some cities turned to stunts to try and stand out: Representatives from Tucson, Arizona, sent a 21-foot tall cactus to Amazon’s Seattle headquarters; New York lit the Empire State Building orange to match Amazon’s smile logo.The company plans to remain in its sprawling Seattle headquarters, and the second one will be “a full equal” to it, founder and CEO Jeff Bezos said in September. Amazon has said that it will announce a decision sometime next year.last_img read more

Bravo pasta sauce seekers create can shortage at Giant Tiger stores

first_imgVANCOUVER – Bravo pasta sauce fans are stocking up on the product that’s reappeared in some Giant Tiger stores after Kraft Canada announced it would bring the recently discontinued sauce back for a limited time following social media outcry.While stores say they’re quickly running out of the pantry staple, die-hard fans hoping to buy a lifetime supply shouldn’t fret because more shipments will arrive soon.“My phone has not stopped ringing for the last two days,” said Richard McKay, owner of a Giant Tiger store in Sudbury, Ont.The store received about 4,000 cans on Nov. 27, which McKay said he put out on the floor that morning. By the evening, there wasn’t any left.It’s a similar scene in many of the other Giant Tiger stores reached by The Canadian Press. Employees said some customers would leave with one or two, while others bought in bulk.A Toronto-area store worker said their location received 144 cans on Tuesday and had less than two dozen left by Thursday morning.A Brampton, Ont., store employee said the initial 128 cans their location received and promptly sold out of was a test and they’re awaiting a “by far” bigger shipment for January.On Kraft Canada’s Facebook page, one Facebook user posted a photo showing a tower of more than a dozen flats of the sauce stacked that she said was in her home.“I’ll fill up my whole room with it,” she said in the accompanying post, asking the company to bring it back permanently.About 180,000 cans were shipped to Giant Tiger stores in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and P.E.I., said Alison Scarlett, a Giant Tiger spokeswoman, in an email. Certain stores in western provinces also received shipments, she said.Some home cooks expressed frustration at how quickly the product sold out at nearby locations, especially when the company first announced the sauce would arrive in stores Dec. 10 rather than late November.Kraft Canada did not respond to a request for comment, but the company answered consumer gripes on its Facebook account.The sauce’s return is a limited time offer and individual stores determine whether to stock it, the company said, encouraging sauce seekers to scour their local Giant Tiger’s flyers to find out when it’ll be available again if it’s currently sold out.Scarlett said some stores have sold out, but the company is doing its best to replenish supplies quickly.McKay said he expects to receive another shipment by Dec. 10. He initially ordered 6,000 cans, but is now trying to get even more.Though, McKay added, he’ll continue to limit customers to 12 cans per person.The discontinued sauce returned after a Welland, Ont., man started an online petition, saying Kraft Canada’s decision left him with beloved family recipes he’ll no longer be able to make.Nearly 11,000 people signed the petition urging the company to bring back the sauce and Kraft Canada announced in mid-November that it would make the product available for a limited time at Giant Tiger stores.It has yet to make a commitment to permanently reinstate the sauce, despite continuing consumer pressure.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.last_img read more

Apple turning distasteful for BJP as growers feel let down

first_imgShimla: The crunchy delicious Himachal apples will hit the markets nearly three months later. But, there are fears that the next crop could be little distasteful for the BJP.In the election time, trouble is brewing in the state’s apple belt. Hundreds of apple growers duped by the commission agents also called as ‘arthiyas’ are up in the arms against the state government and its bodies – Agriculture Produce Marketing Committees (APMCs) for apathy towards their plights. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’The Commission agents (middlemen) have not paid nearly Rs 100 crore to the growers in lieu of their produce i.e., apple boxes sold to the outside buyers and traders at different marketing yards, run by the APMC. “The next season is in the offing but farmers don’t have money to buy inputs and undertake orchard operations. This is a crucial time for apple growers. But, poor farmers are making around of the commission agents. Some farmers have turned penniless,” alleged Sanjay Chauhan, a former Shimla Mayor, who is organising farmers’ struggle for their rights. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KThe state with its Rs 3,500 crore apple economy – which forms 49 per cent of total fruit production in the state, is bound to have an impact on the elections if the growers resort to agitation. Kisan Sangrah Samiti –a body of the farmers backed by CPM leaders, including Sanjay Chauhan, has already given a call for protest in Shimla on April 22. Chauhan has held a series of meetings with the affected farmers at Kotkhai, Rohru and other places —all parts of Shimla Parliamentary constituency. As par Agriculture Marketing Act, the commission agents are accountable for all payments, which accrue to the farmers for the produce sold at the designated marketing places. The commission agents have to take bank guarantees from the wholesale buyers. This is a preventive clause to protect the interests of the farmers. ‘At the fall of the hammer, the buyer has to clear his payments before he takes away the produce. The responsibility lies on the commission agents to pay to the grower. But there is corrupt nexus between the Commission agents, buyers and also those heading the APMCs to dupe the poor growers,” Chauhan says. During state assembly’s budget session, CPM MLA Rakesh Singha and BJP MLA Balbir Verma raised the issue of non-payments for the product to the apple growers. The government admitted that the growers have been left high and dry. The government, however, promised to ensure that all payments and arrears are cleared by March 31, 2019. This has not happened yet. Currently, there are around 91 FIRs registered by the apple growers at different police stations. The amount involved runs in crores. The anger is building-up steadily in the areas known for apple growing. Out of 12 districts in the state, seven are growing apples having more than 1.70 lakh families engaged in the apple cultivation. CPM MLA Rakesh Singha says it’s a new case of farmers distress.The government is not doing anything to stop the loot. The farmers are sole victims.”last_img read more

Finally, China nods

first_imgChina’s retreat from providing international protection for Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) chief Masood Azhar and its patron Islamabad, marks a milestone in the political and diplomatic war on terror with potential reverberations beyond the subcontinent. For a decade, Azhar was cast as the touchstone of Pakistan-China friendship and flag-bearer in a proxy war on India. That finally ended on Wednesday when Beijing wilted under growing international pressure and revulsion towards terrorism and agreed to the Security Council sanctions committee branding him the terrorist he is. Also Read – A special kind of bondTotally isolating them, none of the other 191 other members of the UN – including some who advocate “your-terrorist-is-my-freedom-fighter” policy in other cases – had joined Pakistan and China in backing Azhar. India’s Permanent Representative Syed Akbaruddin said that India’s persistent “subterranean” diplomacy helped achieve this. Now the next milestone in the political and diplomatic war on terror – it is still only that and not an all-out war – will be a global one if that consensus against terrorism can be extended to the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism that was proposed by India in 1996. Also Read – Insider threat managementWork on it has been stuck on the most basic issue – defining terrorism, with some making a false distinction between “freedom-fighters” and terrorists. It escapes them that the mark of terrorism is the method – the wanton killing of civilians including children – and not the ideology. Arriving on a consensus on the convention is the challenge before Sri Lanka’s Permanent Representative Rohan Perera who heads the UN’s working group on eliminating international terrorism. China’s turnabout, despite its words of sympathy for Islamabad, may force Pakistan to take a long-overdue inward look at its policy of classifying terrorists as bad and good – those creating mayhem within the country and those in India. That schizophrenic policy has taken a toll on Pakistan, whose diplomats like to point out that their country has suffered the most from Islamist terror. Yet Islamabad – or specifically its military overlord – was willing to pay the price to keep its army of proxies. For the world, that was too high a price. Pakistan’s strategic doctrine that its nuclear weapons provided immunity against Indian retaliation against its war by terror was tested in the aftermath of the Pulwama attack in February that killed more than 40 Central Reserve Police Force personnel. While that attack itself stung the world, the Indian air retaliation against terror camps and Pakistan’s counter-attack in which an Indian plane was downed showed the international community how fragile the situation is. China had reluctantly gone along with a Security Council press statement condemning the Pulwama attack, which was short of a formal resolution, and it was expected that it might relent on Azhar. But it vetoed in March for the fourth time his listing as a terrorist by the sanctions committee that deals with Al Qaeda, the Islamic State and their affiliates. That re-energised the US, Britain and France to pursue the option of having the Security Council itself declare him a terrorist under sanctions of financial freeze and travel ban. They circulated a US draft resolution and lobbied hard, with Washington declaring it will utilise all available resources. If that resolution were to come up, China would have had to publicly veto it and defend Azhar, which probably gave it pause. China had claimed that it was not convinced by the evidence that Azhar was connected to terrorism, but suddenly it said the evidence it rejected was now convincing. Besides its ties with India, the Afghanistan developments were another incentive for Washington. With negotiations taking place with the Taliban for a settlement, the US would want a complete wind-down of terrorism in the region to protect Afghanistan, and also to ensure that Pakistan does not turn its other proxies fighting Afghanistan towards India. As for China, it was time to recognise its own risks. It has an Islamist terror problem in the Uighar region and beyond, and its support to JeM and Azhar was not buying it goodwill with them. As its One Road, One Belt initiative advances, Beijing will have to ensure the safety of its multi-billion-dollar investments along with it, while ensuring that pan-Islamist terror does not ply the road. Already, China has faced terror attacks in Pakistan, where its workers and resources have been targeted and even its consulate in Karachi attacked last year. Under these circumstances, it had to come out openly against all forms of terrorism if it were to credibly protect its investments elsewhere and even itself. This was the moment for it. Even afar in Sri Lanka, where it has billions invested and loaned, China saw Islamist terrorism’s potential to disrupt the island’s stability with consequences for it. And no doubt, the Sri Lanka suicide bomb massacres on Easter sunday added to the international community’s pressure on China. Sanctions committee chair Dian Triansyah Djani, a soft-spoken Indonesian diplomat with a self-deprecating sense of humour, was able to deftly coalesce these developments into a consensus against Azhar. In the subcontinent, Pakistan now faces the stark choice of complying with the sanctions against Azhar – and those imposed earlier on JeM and Lashkar-e-Tayyiba – or continuing to defy international opinion, perhaps by even spawning new proxies. Perhaps if China has had a true change of heart, it could move Islamabad away from the proxy war. Then in a post-election India, there may be an opportunity for a fresh start having met New Delhi’s prime condition of abandoning terrorism. (The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Smith’s classy 89 not enough as New Zealand win WC warm-up

first_imgBrisbane: Will Young stroked a masterful 130 to steer an under-strength New Zealand to a seven-wicket win over Australia in a World Cup practice match Wednesday, outshining a classy unbeaten 89 from Steve Smith. The visitors chased down their 278 target with 10 balls to spare, inflicting the first one-day defeat on Australia in 10 games, although this was not counted as a full international. Young, who is uncapped and not part of New Zealand’s World Cup squad, was eventually run out after smacking 11 fours and two sixes in his 132-ball knock. George Worker (56) and Tom Latham (69 not out) were also among the runs as New Zealand, missing Kane Williamson, Martin Guptill and Trent Boult, made 283 for three in reply to Australia’s 277 for six. Australian pace spearhead Mitchell Starc made his long-awaited return from injury and was the pick of a lacklustre bowling attack, taking 2-14 off five overs with trademark yorkers before being withdrawn from the action. It was his first match back since tearing a muscle three months ago. Earlier, former skipper Smith was the star attraction with his 89, including four big sixes, in only his second game in Australian colours since his one-year ban for ball-tampering expired. He came to the crease when Shaun Marsh was out for 28 and was in fine touch in a major boost for Australia ahead of their World Cup defence in England. Usman Khawaja and Glenn Maxwell were also in form, scoring 56 and 52 respectively. But David Warner, who made 39 on his return from the “Sandpapergate” scandal in the first of the three unofficial matches in Brisbane on Monday, did not fare so well.last_img read more

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