Barclays Bank of Zimbabwe Limited HY2009 Interim Report

first_imgFirst Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2009 interim results for the half year.For more information about First Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the First Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: First Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw)  2009 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileFirst Capital Bank Limited (formerly Barclays Bank of Zimbabwe) was founded in 1912 and is an iconic institution in the local banking sector; operating across the full spectrum of retail and business banking, and corporate and investment banking with 38 branches nationwide. In addition to mainstream financial products, First Capital Bank offers motor, home, travel, business and personal insurance services. After more than a century operating under its parent company, Barclays plc has sold its majority stake in Barclays Bank of Zimbabwe to FMB Capital Holdings, the Mauritius based holding company, that has banking operations in Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia. FMB Capital Holdings is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange. First Capital Bank Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Lafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng) HY2014 Presentation

first_imgLafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2014 presentation results for the half year.For more information about Lafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Lafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Lafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng)  2014 presentation results for the half year.Company ProfileLafarge Africa Plc is a cement manufacturing company in Nigeria offering high quality concrete and aggregates for the home building and construction sectors. The company is one of the oldest cement manufacturing companies in Nigeria and is a member of the LafargeHolcim Group, the largest building and concrete solutions company in the world. It also diversified interests in manufacturing paint, repairing electric motors, transport services and Kraft bag production. Lafarge Africa Plc has plants in Ewekoro and Sagamu in the South West district; Mfamosing in the South-South district; and Ashaka in the North East district of Nigeria. The company has installed cement production capacity of 10.5MTPA and has plans to increase its production capacity. Its product range includes cement, aggregates, ready-mix concrete and pulverized fly ash. Cement solutions are marketed under the brand names Elephant, Ashaka, Supaset, PowerMax and Unicem. The company’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Lafarge Cement WAPCO Nigeria Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Hotshot: Edinburgh wing Darcy Graham

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fast lane: Darcy Graham in action for Scotland at the Hong Kong Sevens. Photo: Getty Images FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREWhat about Scotland honours? I’ve played U18s, U20s and sevens. I missed out on the U16s – they told me I was too small. That really spurred me on and since then I’ve never let size bother me. Instead I’ve worked on my ball skills.Former Scotland lock Scott MacLeod is your uncle… He was a big part in my decision to go to Edinburgh because he played there and loved it. He’s always been someone I’d go to for advice.What are your goals for this season? I want to try to impress the (Edinburgh) coaching staff and learn as much as I can.Who were your childhood heroes? The player I watched was Shane Williams. He’s pretty much the same build as me and had amazing skills. Watching Stuart Hogg come from Hawick and play for the Lions has been cool too. Find out more about highly-promising Scottish winger Darcy Graham Age 20 (21 July 1997) Born Melrose Club Edinburgh Country Scotland Position Back threeWhen did you first play? I was always a sporty child and started at Stirches Primary School in Hawick when I was eight. I loved it.What other sports did you do? Horse riding. I played football once but the first time the ball came to me, I picked it up and everyone called “handball”!Sounds like rugby is the sport for you. What positions have you played? I’ve pretty much always played wing and in the last couple of years I’ve played a bit at 15. I prefer full-back – you get a bit more space and see more of the ball.Talk us through your progression…I played for Hawick High School and Hawick Wands, the U18 team, then played my first game for Hawick at 17.It was a Scottish Cup final against Boroughmuir. They had an injury and I got a call on the day of the game saying, “The bus is at 12, can you make it?” SoI was chucked in at the deep end but it was an amazing experience running out at Murrayfield, even though we lost. TAGS: Edinburgh Rugby RW Verdict: This is his first season at Edinburgh but he is enjoying the environment under new coach Richard Cockerill. With his drive to improve, expect to see this speedster make his professional debut early this season.This article first appeared in the October 2017 issue of Rugby World.last_img read more

South Carolina: Second priest returns through path for reconciliation

first_img South Carolina This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Comments (5) Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Richard McClellan says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York William A. Flint, PhD says: March 31, 2015 at 1:01 pm Honestly, the Church shouldn’t be in the marriage business at all. It is and has always been a function of the State. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Julian Malakar says: Comments are closed. March 30, 2015 at 8:09 am “Later, explaining why he wanted to return, Wallace wrote that he grieved his loss of connection with The Episcopal Church, the Anglican Communion and the sacred order of priests, and repented of the decisions that led to his removal”.1. Wallace may have grieved hos loss of connection with TEc but while he remained a member of the clergy of the Episcopal Diocese of SC under Bishop Lawrence he was still connected to the Anglican Communion and the sacred order of priests 2, By saying he repented of his decision implies that he committed a sin. What sin did WAllace commit. He remained in the diocese and under the bishop who ordained him. If there is a sin involved, I missed it. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events By Diocesan StaffPosted Mar 27, 2015 Doug Desper says: [Episcopal Church in South Carolina press release] Episcopal Church in South Carolina Bishop Charles G. vonRosenberg has welcomed another returning priest back into good standing in The Episcopal Church through a new process that provides a path for reconciliation for clergy who left following the 2012 split in eastern South Carolina.In a brief liturgy led by vonRosenberg in Charleston on March 24, the Rev. H. Jeff Wallace reaffirmed the vows he took at his ordination in 2007 and signed a formal declaration promising to conform to the doctrine, discipline and worship of The Episcopal Church.He is the second priest to return to The Episcopal Church after the 2012 split. In September 2014, the Rev. H. Dagnall Free, Jr., was reinstated through the same process. Wallace now joins Free and the other clergy of The Episcopal Church as a priest in good standing.Wallace was an associate rector at Christ the King-Waccamaw, Pawley’s Island, when Bishop Mark Lawrence and other officials of the diocese announced they were leaving The Episcopal Church. Wallace said that he loved the parish and his job there; because of those bonds, he stayed at Christ the King-Waccamaw when it voted to follow Lawrence.But their situation changed suddenly in 2014 when Wallace’s church merged with another breakaway church, leaving him without a parish to serve. He and his wife moved to Texas, where he is serving as pastor at a Lutheran church.In the months after the split, Wallace was still a priest who remained under vonRosenberg’s authority within The Episcopal Church. Over a five-month period in 2013, the bishop made efforts to contact each breakaway clergy member. As happened in most cases, Wallace did not reply. As required by church canons, in August 2013, with the advice and consent of the Standing Committee, vonRosenberg removed more than 100 priests and deacons from the ordained ministry of The Episcopal Church.The canons gave the bishop a choice about which disciplinary procedure to follow. One option was to “depose” clergy who did not recognize the church’s authority. VonRosenberg chose instead to “release and remove” the clergy, which left open the hope for reconciliation and eventual reinstatement. That hope was first realized in September 2014, with Free’s reinstatement.Two months after hearing the news about Free, Wallace wrote to vonRosenberg asking about the path to reinstatement. VonRosenberg replied the same day, laying out the steps that would be necessary and putting Wallace in touch with the people who would help guide him through the process.Later, explaining why he wanted to return, Wallace wrote that he grieved his loss of connection with The Episcopal Church, the Anglican Communion and the sacred order of priests, and repented of the decisions that led to his removal. “We are not sure where God will land us, but we are sure of the longing we have in our heart to be back in an Episcopal parish,” he wrote.Canonically, the only requirement for reinstating a priest is the bishop’s approval. But vonRosenberg has stressed the importance of having a process in place that ensures it will be the right move not only for the priest, but for the entire church.In consultation with the Standing Committee, Chancellor Tom Tisdale, and Commission on Ministry member Amy Webb, the bishop set forth a reinstatement procedure that required:Consulting with the bishop on a regular, ongoing basis;Working with a development coach for evaluations and discussions about the person’s spiritual journey;Cooperating with the administrative staff in rebuilding a professional file, including background checks, training certificates, references and other documentation. Many of these documents are still controlled by the breakaway group, which has refused to release them to clergy who chose to remain in The Episcopal Church;Meeting with the Standing Committee to discuss the desire for reinstatementWallace met March 24 with the Standing Committee, which voted its approval immediately.VonRosenberg said the process has proven to be a good one, and probably will be used again. Discussions are in progress with other clergy who have approached the bishop after learning about the reconciliation process.The bishop and Tisdale also have been named to serve on the Constitution and Canons Committee of the 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church this summer in Salt Lake City, where church officials are expected to consider reinstatement procedures for the entire church. March 30, 2015 at 2:40 pm Separation is always painful no matter who is right or wrong. It is not as easy as many think to adopt new environments as well as to give up thousands of years traditional value of Church’s teaching on virtue and vice. Only God can judge who is right or wrong on receiving God’s grace for forgiveness of sins. But Church should allow all believers to grow spiritually keeping core value of traditional biblical teaching by which Episcopal/Anglican was established. We are sheep and Christ is our Shepard we recognize Christ’s voice thru teaching of Gospel not by contemporary human voice of today. Contemporary voice dies with time but voice of Christ is evergreen. Christ is the head of the Church. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA April 5, 2015 at 11:10 am Thank you! Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET South Carolina: Second priest returns through path for reconciliation Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 March 27, 2015 at 3:15 pm One wonders what crisis of conscience among clergy will occur this Summer. The General Convention has married the age and will insist on making Christian Marriage what it has never been in 2,000 years in direct defiance of Jesus in Matthew 19, as well as the Anglican Communion councils on unity and marriage.How many priests and informed laity will feel trapped by the Church they have loved and come to understand? How many priests will be labeled as seditious if they stand up for the sacrament of Christian Marriage as spoken by Christ Himself in Matthew 19/Genesis 2?How many will accommodate just to get along for daily bread and a pension?The crisis of conscience at this coming General Convention is not over petty topics of Elizabethan versus modern language in a new Prayer Book (1979). It’s about what authority runs this Church: the authority of a Church’s loyalty test that becomes a law unto itself, or a Church that expects its clergy and laity to believe that the Holy Scriptures contain all things necessary for salvation. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls David Wilson says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Saint Augustine’s president, with deep ties to university’s past, looks…

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls March 22, 2017 at 5:28 pm Shame on Dr. Ward for not being willing to challenge DeVos’ statement! Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Theological Education Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Everett Ward became the 11th president of Saint Augustine’s University in Raleigh, North Carolina, in April 2015. Photo: Saint Augustine’s University[Episcopal News Service] Generations of Everett Ward’s family preceded him in graduating from Saint Augustine’s University, a historically black college in Raleigh, North Carolina, so he was no stranger to the campus in 2014 when he took over as interim president.He was named to that role permanently in April 2015, becoming the school’s 11th president.Q&A: Everett WardAge: 58Home: Raleigh, North CarolinaEducation: Bachelor’s degree, Saint Augustine’s; master’s degree, North Carolina State University; doctorate, North Carolina A&T State UniversityJob: President of Saint Augustine’s UniversityFamily: He married his college sweetheart after graduating from Saint Augustine’s in 1982. Cassandra Lloyd Ward, a longtime educator and civic leader, died in 2011 of breast cancer. “When I walk this campus every day, her spirit walks with me, because we held hands and walked this campus together for four years,” Ward said.Before that, his professional experience included serving as executive director of the North Carolina Democratic Party and as the director of a state Department of Transportation program focused on transportation curriculum, research and student development at historically black colleges and universities.Saint Augustine’s was created in 1867 by the Episcopal Church and opened its doors the following January; one of many schools that formed in the wake of the Civil War to educate black students barred by segregation from attending white institutions.About 100 such schools are still open today, accepting students of all races and interests. Dozens of presidents of historically black colleges and universities, including Ward, traveled to Washington, D.C., at the end of February to meet with elected officials and make their case for increased federal funding to support the schools’ mission. During their visit, President Donald Trump signed an executive order moving an executive branch initiative on historically black colleges from the Department of Education into the White House, signaling the removal of a bureaucratic barrier.Your ties to Saint Augustine’s university go far back, even back to your birth.That is correct. My father attended Saint Augustine’s and all my relatives for several generations. And I was born here on the campus at St. Agnes Hospital, which was operated by the university as the only African-American teaching hospital between here and Atlanta, Georgia. On Nov. 6, 1958, I was honored to be born in a building that a great uncle of mine helped construct when he was a student here.Were you raised as an Episcopalian?No, I was raised as a Presbyterian and I am still a Presbyterian, but was educated both in Catholic schools and public schools, as well as the Episcopal school here at St. Augustine’s. So, church-affiliated education was not new to me or my sister.Was your family particularly religious growing up?My family’s faith was very strong, and faith was a central part of our upbringing as a family. My parents were very active at Davie Street Presbyterian Church, which is our home church and has been the church of our ancestors for several generations.Has Saint Augustine’s connection with the Episcopal Church set it apart in any ways from other historically black colleges or other American colleges in general?For many years, even from our founding, Saint Augustine’s was focused primarily on male students going into the priesthood. Therefore Saint Augustine’s had earned a reputation as the preeminent institution that produced African-American male graduates who would leave Saint Augustine’s and move on to seminary and become Episcopal priests. And women students were dedicated to becoming educators and teachers. So, we have long had a strong reputation of producing men and women who, at that period of time, were focused in education and service to the church. But that has evolved over the year as more opportunities have become available to young people, so now we have graduates in a host of professions throughout the world.In Saint Augustine’s mission statement, it says the school prepares students “academically, socially and spiritually.” Do you see those three goals as equal priorities, and how does Saint Augustine provide spiritual preparation?We have a strong religious studies program and we continue to have spirituality as a focus in our activities on the campus. Our freshmen, for example, attend chapel. We open all our events with prayer and close with prayer. Our university chaplain, who’s also chair of our religious studies program, is very active with student life on the campus. We as an institution take great pride in our affiliation with the church and the importance of spirituality for our students as well.Pew Research Center reported last month less than 9 percent of black students attended a historically black college in 2015, down from 17 percent in 1980.  Over the same period, historically black colleges and universities have become more racially diverse, enrolling more students who aren’t black, from 13 to 17 percent. Do you see that the role of institutions like your own and other historically black colleges has changed for this generation?We certainly have a much more diverse society in America now. We have students of Latino descent, Asian descent – we have a very diverse student body. But I do think that the relevancy of any intellectual community has got to be that you grow and advance with the changing society, because we’re producing the leaders of society here at St. Augustine’s and subsequently you have to embrace diversity.You were part of a group of presidents of historically black colleges and universities to visit the White House recently and even meet with President Trump.At his request, we were invited for a brief meeting over in the Oval Office, but the primary meeting took place under the leadership of U.S. Senator Tim Scott (South Carolina) and North Carolina Congressman Mark Walker.What are your thoughts on those meetings and experience?I thought clearly that there was strong articulation with regard to support of historically black colleges and universities and the enormous contributions that our institutions contribute to American society. It was, in all of those settings, a central theme. There was an appreciation from this administration that historically black colleges would be a part of the continuous growth of American society and beyond. I think now, with the signing of the executive order by the president, we now have to wait and see how those priorities that were articulated with regard to historically black colleges are represented in the budget that will be presented, and passed by both the House and the Senate.(Editor’s note: After this interview was conducted, President Trump on March 16 released a budget proposal that, Inside Higher Ed reports, maintains funding for historically black colleges and universities but reduces spending on programs that support many students of those schools, such as work-study programs and a grant program for low-income students.)There also was some backlash to the meeting. Students at Howard University protested their president’s participation, and Morehouse College President John Wilson Jr. put out a statement calling the meetings “troubling.” Do you share some of the concerns?Well, I think anytime you can assemble together and have dialog about the future of the institutions that you manage on a day-to-day basis, it’s always productive. I think at this point, as I said earlier, we’re waiting to see what the budgetary priorities will reflect. So, we’re looking forward to that.There also was criticism of comments Education Secretary Betty DeVos made that historically black colleges were “real pioneers when it comes to school choice,” rather than formed out of necessity because of segregation. Did you have any reaction to those comments?No. I think sometimes not understanding history and not understanding the context for which these universities were founded, people can make sometimes misleading statements. So, I didn’t have any comment on that at all.Racial reconciliation has been a prominent issue in the Episcopal Church in recent years as it faces its own historical complicity with slavery and racism. Do you see Saint Augustine’s playing a role in the church’s reconciliation efforts?Oh, yes, we are as a university in full support of the presiding bishop’s priority around racial reconciliation and the Jesus Movement. And we are amenable in a way that Saint Augustine’s University can be a part of serving as a catalyst or platform where dialog can take place and intellectual exchange can happen to advance stronger race relations in the nation. We are in full support of that, and I commend the church for its efforts to have an open dialog about the future.Saint Augustine’s is turning 150 years old. Any thoughts on what the university will look like in another 150 years?Another 150 years, we see a very active academic and intellectual community with innovative programs. You know, everything is moving to distance learning now. We see expanding, of course, distance learning and adding graduate programs. We certainly see an expansion on our original founding with regard to religious studies, making sure that we continue to introduce young scholars who are interested in the Episcopal Church to prepare themselves here and then move on to seminary. And Saint Augustine’s is currently in a food desert, so building on the legacy of St. Agnes Hospital we see ourselves as a health catalyst to provide training and opportunities around health disparities and issues regarding health as well.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] This interview was lightly edited for clarity and condensed. Comments (1) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By David PaulsenPosted Mar 22, 2017 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Saint Augustine’s president, with deep ties to university’s past, looks to future Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Alma Simmons says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York People, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Velazquez defines her role on City Council as building unity, and…

first_img The Anatomy of Fear April 10, 2018 at 12:18 pm Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Okay, we went to vote out at NWRC this morning around 10:30 am, and I saw both candidate’s supporters out there, and Commissioner Velazquez standing around out there in the parking lot, and it was thundering and was some keen lightning happening, and it is still lightning bad right now…..you all please be careful out there, in that open field, and up at the VFW too, it is dangerous to be standing around out in that lightning with umbrellas! I know you both want to win, but be careful, and stay out of that lightning!…It is not worth it to get struck with a bolt! Good luck to you both on the runoff……… 1 COMMENT Please enter your comment! Decision Apopka 2018Apopka City Commission Candidate Feature: Seat #2 Commissioner Diane VelazquezCommissioner Diane Velazquez has a heart for Apopka. She has been a consistent voice for unity in the city as well as on the City Council. If there is an event in Apopka, she is most likely in attendance.In 2014, Velazquez burst onto the Apopka political scene with a surprising victory over 18-year incumbent Marilyn Ustler-McQueen with 55% of the vote. Her margin of victory was the largest in that election cycle – outperforming both Apopka Mayor Joe Kilsheimer and Commissioner Sam Ruth, who were both eventual winners in runoffs.Apopka City Commissioner Diane VelazquezAnd after becoming a commissioner, she immediately began to define its role.“It’s more than just reviewing and deciding on new city projects, proposals, city charter changes, and any other issues the city and its residents may face in the ever-changing future of our city.  Additionally, the role of a city commissioner is to make decisions on facts and taking into consideration the needs of the community at large. When I say, “More than just decision making,” It’s my opinion that commissioners need to be in contact with the community at all times.  A commissioner needs to attend community meetings, attend organizational meetings and gatherings, attend school functions and church services.  I have been invited to many church services in our community and I have attended almost all the services that I was invited to.  Staying in touch with the residents, business people and others that visit and are in contact with our city is a very important part of being a city commissioner.”Velazquez is challenged by Leroy Bell, Alicia Koutsoulieris, and Alice Nolan for her re-election to the Apopka City Commission Seat #2, and in this race, she is drawing on her experiences both as an Apopka resident and in her previous career.Velazquez is a retired New York City Police detective who achieved the rank of Detective 2nd Grade, serving as a medical insurance fraud investigator for the agency. During her career, she attended and successfully completed several investigative courses within the agency. She also attended weekend college courses at Nassau Community College, in Long Island.She has been actively involved in the community since moving to Apopka in April of 2005. She is married to Ed Velazquez, who is also a retired law enforcement officer and a Vietnam veteran. One of Velazquez’s two sons, Samuel, is a police officer and also served overseas with the U.S. Army in Iraq and Afghanistan. Velazquez has also served as a volunteer in school and sporting events for her two young grandchildren.She is proud of her role on the City Council and her public service to the community, but perhaps her most cherished moment was her effort to obtain an artifact of one of the original Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, which was in assistance for Apopka Boy Scout Christian Lamphere’s Eagle Scout project. In just a few months, she was awarded one of the last remaining artifacts. Her husband Ed drove to New York City to bring it to Apopka, where it was unveiled to the public as part of Lamphere’s 9/11 Memorial at City Hall on September 11, 2016.Commissioner Diane Velazquez: “It’s more than just reviewing and deciding on new city projects, proposals, city charter changes, and any other issues the city and its residents may face in the ever-changing future of our city. Staying in touch with the residents, business people and others that visit and are in contact with our city is a very important part of being a city commissioner.”“It changed my life and it changed my husband’s life,” said Velazquez, referring to 9/11. “We can never forget the events that happened that day. This project has brought our community together for a very special remembrance of September 11th and galvanized a patriotic spirit in everyone involved. To see how bright our future is, you just need to see how this community came together to make a boy scout’s dream come true. When confronted with obstacles, he found a way around them. He challenged all of us. He challenged me. His persistence has given us strength. And we have to remain a united community.”She was also excited to play a role in bringing Apopka Fire Station #5 online in 2018. “For me, this is such a crowning glory,” she said at its grand opening. “I have been involved with the fire department from the very beginning. And to see it come to fruition… to actually see it become a reality is very emotional for me. I absolutely love our first responders. As a retired and former first responder, I understand what it is to serve and so to get this fire station finished is a blessing. I thank each and every one of you who served here.”Velazquez is also an advocate for the economic development in Apopka.“As I have stated many times before, Apopka is a growing community. Its location makes it a favorable and attractive place for families that want to settle here. Not only are they setting roots in Apopka, but businesses are following the growth trend. This trend will affect Apopka and Central Florida as a whole for many years to come.”No matter the outcome, Velazquez will continue to be in service to the community, and a champion of unity in Apopka. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replycenter_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name here Mama Mia Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSCommissioner Diane VelazquezDecision Apopka 2018 Previous articleDrivers should expect to pay more at the pump this springNext articleNolan continues to surprise Apopka with Seat #2 run Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Mensaje de condolencias de la Red de Mujeres en Lucha del Centro de Acción Internacional

first_imgLas y los miembros del Centro de Acción Internacional y de su organización hermana, la Red de Mujeres en Lucha, nos unimos al dolor de nuestras queridas compañeras de la Federación de Mujeres Cubanas y de la Federación Democrática Internacional de Mujeres por el fallecimiento del siempre presente Comandante Fidel. Extendemos también estas condolencias a todo el pueblo de Cuba.El legado de Fidel no es solo histórico.  Sus enseñanzas están vivas y son materia de diario estudio y ejecución en la lucha por un mundo con justicia social. Particularmente ahora que vivimos en un tiempo de tanto peligro a la humanidad.Fidel, el Fidel sabio, el humilde, el generoso, el Fidel ameno y conversador, el interesado por todos los aspectos de la vida y del ser humano. ¡Cuánto se crece al estudiar a Fidel, al escuchar sus profundos discursos o leer sus análisis!¡Qué fortuna haber vivido en tiempos de Fidel! Un hombre que soñó con una revolución para transformar la miseria que su pueblo vivía bajo la terrible dictadura de Batista, en una sociedad humana, generosa, igualitaria. Que luego junto a sus camaradas de lucha logró hacer la revolución y después desarrollarla en revolución socialista. Y cuando su condición física no se lo permitía más estar al frente, se retiró, no de ser revolucionario, eso nunca dejó de serlo. Entonces se dedicó al análisis político. A cementar las experiencias. ¿Cuántos seres en la historia de nuestros pueblos han tenido esa dicha de haber podido realizar tantas funciones durante su vida?El imperio quiso eliminarlo, pero con cada acción hostil estadounidense, Fidel se crecía, se agigantaba.Su sueño de una Cuba justa para su pueblo se extendió hacia todas las latitudes.  La salud, la educación, el apoyo a las luchas por la independencia, contra la explotación, tuvieron a nivel internacional el apoyo siempre activo y solidario de Cuba y de su pueblo.En Estados Unidos, el pueblo consciente que conoce a Cuba, jóvenes pobres estadounidenses que han podido llegar a ser médicos gracias a la generosidad del pueblo cubano al estudiar en la Escuela Latinoamericana de Medicina, personas y activistas progresistas que ven a la Revolución Cubana como un Norte, recuerdan y lloran la partida física del Comandante.Fidel, ¡siempre estarás presente! ¡Gracias por todo Fidel!FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Head of journalists’ union facing dismissal for criticising his newspaper

first_img RSF_en News MalaysiaAsia – Pacific Reporters Without Borders condemns the way that Hata Wahari, the president of the National Union Of Journalists Malaysia (NUJ), is being treated by his newspaper, the Kuala Lumpur-based daily Utusan Malaysia. The newspaper is owned by the United Malays National Organization (UMNO), a political party that has played a dominant role in Malaysia since independence.An internal enquiry by the newspaper’s top management concluded on 14 April that Wahari was guilty of damaging its image in a series of statements last year in which he accused the newspaper of failing to provide the public with objective news coverage and slanting its reporting in favour of the ruling coalition to which UMNO belongs.“As NUJ president, Wahari has every right to raise issues of journalistic ethics,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Although the newspaper’s management cannot sue this experienced journalist, his comments are liable to result in his dismissal. It shows that the management wants to take reprisals and that its relations with the government are too close. A free and outspoken press is incompatible with political interference in press matters.”The internal enquiry was carried out by a panel consisting of three senior members of the Utusan Malaysia management – the general manager of marketing, the head of internal audit and the finance manager.Reporters Without Borders tried to speak to senior representatives at Utusan Malaysia but they refused to make any comment. Wahari said his punishment would be decided by the executive chairman, the editor in chief and the executive director. He was “expecting the worst,” he said.Wahari added: “In Malaysia I’m protected by the law and they cannot sue me. Under the Industrial Relations Act, I have immunity. The only way they can get me is by means of a domestic or internal inquiry.”Wahari, who has worked for Utusan Malaysia since 1995, was elected NUJ president last September. The internal enquiry began in January and the punishment is due to be announced at the end of April.If he is fired, he will be the third Utusan Malaysia journalist to lose his job because of his union activities, the Asia Sentinel news website said. Former NUJ president Yazid Othman and the former head of the NUJ section at Utusan Malaysia, Amran Ahmad, were also dismissed.Malaysia is ranked 141st out of 178 countries in the 2010 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. News Receive email alerts News News Organisation New Malaysian ordinance threatens very concept of truth to go furthercenter_img March 17, 2021 Find out more Record fine for Malaysian news site over readers’ comments Help by sharing this information February 22, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Malaysia MalaysiaAsia – Pacific April 19, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Head of journalists’ union facing dismissal for criticising his newspaper Malaysian cartoonist Zunar facing possible sedition charge again January 29, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Tesco workers shouldn’t lose Family Income Supplement, says O’Dea

first_imgBusinessNewsPoliticsTesco workers shouldn’t lose Family Income Supplement, says O’DeaBy Editor – February 24, 2017 741 Facebook Advertisement WhatsApp Email Previous articleJobpath preventing people from taking workNext articleTalking Heads screening makes sense for Millennium Film Club Editor Twitter Willie O’Dea TDFianna Fáil TD Willie O’Dea has called upon the Minister for Social Protection to ensure that no Tesco worker loses their Family Income Supplement (FIS) as a result of engaging in legal, official strike action.“There is now a very real possibility of the Department of Social Protection cutting off Tesco workers’ FIS payment as a result of them withdrawing their labour on foot of a valid industrial relations dispute,” said Deputy O’Dea.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “This would be a completely unfair and mean spirited move. I believe that there is scope under the current legislation for the Minister to direct that no such decision is made.“By engaging in strike action, the workers are already seeing a reduction in their take home pay; a cut to their FIS payment will devastate families. Those potentially affected by such a decision are the ones who can afford it the least that’s why they are in receipt of FIS in the first place.”“I am calling on Minister Varadkar to confirm that his Department will not allow FIS to be cut off for Tesco workers on strike. My party is willing to facilitate an amendment to the legislation if necessary. Workers should not lose out on the double if engaged in lawful, official strike action,” concluded O’Dea. Print Tesco to further support local communities in Limerick with Community Fund donation to support services during Covid-19 center_img Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR O’Dea criticizes new Government mortgage scheme TAGSDeputy Willie O’DeaMinister Leo Varadkartesco Alleyway to be closed due to anti-social behaviour Antisocial behaviour warnings slashed in Limerick Limerick plans for Lidl halted Animal Welfare sanctuary to benefit from Tesco fund last_img read more

City adopting master plansWater, wastewater both are on the agenda

first_img City adopting master plansWater, wastewater both are on the agenda IN OTHER BUSINESS, THE CITY COUNCIL WILLConsider approval of City Council minutes, May 28, 2019.Consider approval of City Council workshop minutes, May 28, 2019.Consider approval of City Council work session minutes, June 4, 2019.Consider approval of the request of Nestor M. Quinonez, owner, for original zoning of Light Industrial (LI) on an approximately 0.3 acre tract in Section 32, Block 42, T-2-S, T&P Ry. Co. Survey, Ector County, Texas (southwest of the intersection of Maurice Rd. and S. County Rd. West) (Ordinance – Second and Final Approval).Consider approval of the annexation of 4521 W. 42nd St., 12012 W. Westland Dr., and 3510 W. 14th St., into the Ector County Utility District (Resolution).Consider rejection of bids for overflow basin liner.Consider authorizing the abandonment of a portion of 20’ alley right of way upon receipt of payment in the amount of valuation to be set by Ector County Appraisal District.Consider renewal of contract for auctioneering services.Open a public hearing to consider approval of the request by Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, owner, for rezoning from Single Family-Three (SF-3) to Neighborhood Services (NS) on Lots 10-14, Block 62, Harrisdale Subdivision (at the northwest corner of University Blvd. and Ventura Ave.) (Ordinance — First Approval).Open a public hearing to consider approval of the request by XTX Associates, LLC, owner, Newton Engineering, agent, for rezoning from Planned Development-Retail (PD-R) to Light Commercial (LC) on Lots 12-13, Block 41, Harrisdale Addition, 6th Filing (on the northeast corner of Troy Ave. and University Blvd.) (Ordinance — First Approval).Open a public hearing to consider amending the boundary lines of the five Single Member Districts (SMDs) to include the lands annexed pursuant to Ordinance 2018-46, adopted on November 27, 2018 (Ordinance — First Approval). Pinterest Facebook Twitter WhatsApp WhatsApp Odessa logo, City Council RGB wide.jpg The Odessa City Council will consider adopting master plans for the city’s water and wastewater during their Tuesday meeting, providing the city with plans to pursue future city water projects.Council members will meet to consider the plans and other agenda items during their meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday on the fifth floor of City Hall, 411 W. Eighth St.Assistant City Manager Phillip Urrutia said these master plans would be identifying projects, which could be undertaken immediately, or in the near future, for greater development of the city.“It could be rehab of sewer lines, or it could be additional water storage, water capacity, things of that nature,” Urrutia said. “This adopting will allow the City Council to have a game plan from this point on and decided and prioritize which projects should be pursued.”The city is already considering a number of needed improvements to their water treatment plant, and is also considering a potential new reverse osmosis facility that could significantly improve the quality of the city’s water. Current improvements needed include upgrading processing and electrical equipment, and the instrumentation and control systems.Improvements to just the existing facility have an estimated cost of about $65 million, which would be paid for through the sale of treated wastewater to Pioneer Natural Resources. A potential RO facility would cost about $80 million.Both of these improvements are still in the engineering phase, and Utilities Director Tom Kerr said the City Council would consider approving funding for either just the improvements or the improvements and the RO facility sometime this summer.The city will also look at approving a request by the Odessa Housing Finance Corporation to rezone some of their lots from general residential to special dwelling districts. Zoning Director Randy Brinlee said OHFC would be converting these lots into 12 lots, which he said would maximize their redevelopment there for affordable housing.“We figured that’s probably the best way to go because if it stayed general housing, they could put housing there but not as many lots,” Brinlee said.Under the rezoning, Brinlee said it would be converted into a small cul-de-sac with six lots on each side. Each lot would be about 40 feet in width, 10 feet shorter than the required 50 feet width for general residential lots.“You have a lot more options to maximize use of property with a special dwelling district,” Brinlee said. “It fits their needs a lot better to be able to go that route.”The rezoning request will have to be approved one final time at the next City Council meeting before it is finalized. TAGS  Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 Twitter Facebook Local News Previous article060419_El_Pollo_Riendo_JF_08Next articleCHAREN: Remove children from sex offender registries Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more