Church without walls uses food truck to drive home Christian…

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Poverty & Hunger November 27, 2017 at 5:34 pm How about a National Conference on feeding ministries in Episoapl Churches where some walls are actually crumbling down Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Ann Fontaine says: Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Martha Blacklock says: Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT November 28, 2017 at 2:00 pm Really good news. Thanks for spreading it. Steele isn’t the only Episcopal priest enlisting a food truck to disseminate meals and a gospel message, nor is he alone in the church planting trend of holding spiritual gatherings outside of traditional church spaces. But his work is receiving national attention partly for his deliberate blend of outreach and Episcopal traditions, preferring not to minimize sacramental connections.“There’s something to do with how we eat and who we eat with that says something about how we relate to God above,” Steele said, adding that references to food permeate the gospels.He cited Matthew 25, in which Jesus said those who care for the needy will inherit the kingdom of the God. Jesus’ list of those in need is expansive – strangers, prisoners, the sick, the naked – and it starts with those who hunger and thirst: “I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink.”The idea behind St. Isidore’s is to go beyond giving food to the hungry. Steele and other staff members and volunteers are deliberate about creating communion at the same time.“It’s really our idea not to just pop in and get people fed and leave again,” said Molly Carr, the full-time food truck missioner at St. Isidore’s. “Ours is really about community, about building relationship around the table, and that is how we think Jesus built relationships. We’re kind of following that lead.”St. Isidore’s food truck missioner Molly Carr shows off the Abundant Harvest truck, which is the focal point of many of the church’s ministries. Photo: Abundant HarvestPart of her role resembles that of a food pantry coordinator, as she collects excess groceries donated by stores in the suburban Houston area to repackage for distribution through the food truck. That process becomes an opportunity to bring together another one of St. Isidore’s communities: the volunteers who gather twice a week to help sort the food while also enjoying fellowship, Christian renewal and the meals that they bring back to their families at home.In this, as in each of St. Isidore’s communities, Steele said the goal is to create a sacred space that maintains sacramental Christianity without depending on a church building.“I love churches,” Steele said. “I’m just not entirely sure we need to build many more of them.”Searching for the church economySteele, born in Omaha, Nebraska, spent most of his childhood in California, where he described his spiritual upbringing as “culturally Irish Roman Catholic.” His family moved to Houston when he was 16. He didn’t initially hear a call to ordained ministry, going to college instead to study finance and accounting.That training helped him land a job at Enron, at a time when the Houston-based energy company was one of the largest in the world – but also shortly before it would collapse into bankruptcy in 2001.Suddenly out of a job, “I had a sort of moment of clarity where I realized that’s not the direction I wanted to take my life,” he said. Instead, he went back to school and got a master’s degree in Roman Catholic systematic theology.A fellow student in his program was an Episcopalian and introduced Steele to the Episcopal Church. From that experience, Steele embarked in 2006 on a six-year journey to ordination, first as an Episcopal deacon in 2012 and as a priest in 2013 after graduating from the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas.Trinity Episcopal in The Woodlands was his first church, where he served his curacy. In conversations with Trinity’s rector, the Rev. Gerald Sevick, Steele already had ideas for starting a church plant, and Steele said Sevick encouraged that thinking, as did Diocese of Texas Bishop Andy Doyle.As Steele took on the role of associate rector at Trinity, Sevick gave him a few hours each week starting in early 2015 in which he was free to dream big, get creative, conduct research and search for the answer to what it means to be church in the 21st century.By October 2015, he had a plan for St. Isidore’s as a church plant of Trinity Episcopal, with fundraising underway and an initial goal of purchasing a food truck. Named for the patron saint of peasant laborers, St. Isidore’s started with one community of eight adults and five children, including Steele’s own family, that met in a house.Since then, it has grown to include groups that meet at restaurants, taverns, a boxing gym and spoken-word poetry events. Its monthly “laundry love” events at a local laundromat pay for hundreds of loads of laundry, but they don’t end there – Mass is held inside the laundromat in English and Spanish, and worshipers also are offered social service assistance, from flu shots to haircuts.And, of course, food is served. The laundromat is one of the many regular stops on the Abundant Harvest truck’s monthly route, which includes meals at a low-income apartment complex.“We are a church that believes, at the heart, we are called to feed people,” Steele said. “So, we create environments where communion is built around the table.”Coffee, prayer and an abundant harvestThe community dinners offered at the apartment complex come with a prayer service. There’s always an extra seat at the table, Carr said, and volunteers are assigned specifically to engage the residents in conversations and make them feel welcome as they are eating their meals.“These are our neighbors we’re eating with, and they’re eating with their neighbors,” Carr said. “And when you can have a conversation over a meal that’s healthy and tastes good, physiologically, that’s going to make you feel better.”Steele talks of promoting a church economy that values things differently from American capitalist society. That church economy is on humble display every Monday and Thursday morning in the kitchen of Trinity Episcopal.At 6:45 a.m., about a half dozen people gather to help unload food deliveries and sort through bruised apples, rotten bananas and cracked eggs to repackage unspoiled items suitable for the families that the Abundant Harvest food truck serves.These volunteers also are some of the food truck’s clients, ranging from struggling college students to senior citizens to single parents, and they get to take a portion of the food home with them, a process of giving and receiving that sends ripples in all directions.“It’s really a very mellow and positive environment,” said Dulce Cueva Salas, a 33-year-old native of Costa Rica who is part of the crew of volunteers that helps sort food on Mondays. Carr also hired Cueva Salas part time this fall to help with some of the meal distribution, especially in Spanish-speaking neighborhoods. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Church without walls uses food truck to drive home Christian mission of feeding body, soul Food and Faith: Series focuses on church’s anti-hunger work Submit an Event Listing Ruth Campbell says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest November 27, 2017 at 5:39 pm crumbling down metaphorically by going into the communities with prayer and food I do know how to spell Episcopal in the previous comment.center_img Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET November 28, 2017 at 11:35 am This is a great story. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL By David PaulsenPosted Nov 27, 2017 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Food and Faith, Ruth Campbell says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments (4) Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET “The whole idea behind the food truck, behind Abundant Harvest, it just drives me,” Cueva Salas said. “It really calls me. I feel like I have a call.”New volunteers come and go, making friends along the way as they work their morning shifts. Some volunteers have in the past invited others over for dinner, enjoying the food they have received together and further extending the fellowship.The choice of the word “abundant” in the food truck ministry’s name was deliberate. God’s abundance is everywhere, Carr said, and not just in the food these families share. After bringing in the food, they pause each morning to have coffee and pray together. When the sorting begins, Carr puts on music in the background. Conversations bloom – not necessarily serious or profound, just people catching up on their lives, she said.The work and cleanup are usually done by 8 a.m. (or by 7:30 a.m. for Carr’s more-experienced Thursday crew), and the volunteers say their goodbyes and go on their way with their bags of food.“We’re trying to give people an amount of food that actually makes a difference,” Steele said.The food Cueva Salas takes home after volunteering Mondays mornings – bread, milk, cheese, eggs, meat and plenty of fruits and vegetables – makes a big difference for her family. Her husband is unemployed, and they have a 9-year-old son and 7-year-old daughter to feed.“It has been a blessing for us,” she said, and the work has been a personal blessing for her. “I love cooking. I love prepping food and giving it to people. I think the best times is when you are around people eating.”Not everyone who participates in one of St. Isidore’s communities comes to nurture a relationship with God, Steele said. When the food truck stops at the laundromat, some visitors pick up food and simply go home. That’s fine, too.“The goal is to bring about the kingdom of God,” Steele said. “And then I think that, of course, at the end of the day, we are called to feed people that are hungry and give them food. People are thirsty, we want to give them drink.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Volunteers with St. Isidore’s Episcopal Church’s Abundant Harvest food truck distribute free meals in early September as part of Hurricane Harvey relief efforts in the Houston, Texas, area. Photo: Abundant Harvest[Episcopal News Service] It is hard to differentiate the feeding ministry from the work of spiritual enrichment underway at St. Isidore’s Episcopal Church. That difficulty is by design.St. Isidore’s is a church built without walls but with a set of wheels that allows it to bring faith and food to several small communities of worshippers north of Houston, Texas. Some meet at a Taco Bell or a Panera Bread, others at a laundromat. Central to the mission is the Abundant Harvest food truck, which serves as a focal point for developing Christian relationships while alleviating both physical and spiritual hunger.“I think people need to be nourished body, mind and soul,” said the Rev. Sean Steele, who started St. Isidore’s in 2015 as a church plant through Trinity Episcopal Church in The Woodlands, Texas. It now supports eight distinct faith communities totaling about 80 people, as well as its Abundant Harvest ministries. “Feeding and eating is a huge part of everything we do.”Episcopal News Service caught up with him by phone to conclude its “Food and Faith” series on the range of efforts within the Episcopal Church to fight hunger.The Rev. Sean Steele leads a September gathering of the Warrior Church, a community of St. Isidore’s Episcopal Church that meets for fellowship, worship and exercise at a fitness club in the Houston area. Photo: Warrior Church, via Facebook‘Food and Faith’Episcopal News Service’s five-part series focuses on anti-hunger efforts in the Episcopal Church, from food pantries to the church’s advocacy on government programs that fight hunger. All stories in the series are available here.St. Isidore’s growth over the past few months has been driven largely by the congregation’s relief efforts in the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Steele estimates his parishioners and volunteers have served about 10,000 meals to people suddenly in need of food because they lost their homes in the late-August storm and subsequent flooding.“It has shown us what we are capable of,” Steele said. And although the urgent need for hurricane relief has thankfully decreased, the feeding ministry has maintained its momentum. Donations have increased. Its volunteer list has more than tripled. St. Isidore’s likely will serve 750 meals or more each week through the end of the year. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

Update: Washington National Cathedral prepares to help family, nation honor…

first_img Comments (4) By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 29, 2018 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Sen. John McCain, who died Aug. 25 of brain cancer, served in the U.S. Senate from 1987 until his death. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1983 until he entered the Senate. Photo: Office of Sen. John McCainThis story was updated Aug. 31 to add links to the Washington National Cathedral order of service and livestream.[Episcopal News Service] Washington National Cathedral may be the site of state funerals and national memorial services and celebrations, but it is also a worshipping community whose members come to the cavernous building on the highest hill in Washington, D.C., to mark the significant moments of their lives. And that is why on Sept. 1 the morning’s funeral for Sen. John McCain will be followed that afternoon by a wedding.“This couple is actually having their reception in the back of the nave, so we’re going to be moving in hundreds of chairs and moving out hundreds of chairs and then flipping it over again Saturday night for services on Sunday morning,” the Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, cathedral dean, told Episcopal News Service in an interview.It’s all hands on deck for the cathedral’s 80-plus employees as they prepare for McCain’s funeral, set for 10 a.m., and for the services that follow. “Some employees will be here all night Friday night and well into Saturday night,” he said.Sen. John McCain delivers remarks on the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 2017. Photo: Office of Sen. John McCainMcCain’s funeral no doubt will be the largest such service held in the cathedral since former President Gerald R. Ford’s funeral service in 2007, he said. The cathedral has been the setting for many presidential funerals and other services at times of national crises and natural disasters. There have been prayers for peace and services to remember the victims of the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, Hurricane Katrina and the Haitian earthquake, among others.McCain, who died Aug. 25 from brain cancer just before his 82nd birthday, was a long-time Arizona senator who also had spent years as a prisoner of war after being shot down over Hanoi during the Vietnam War.It takes more than 80 people to stage a service such as the McCain funeral. More than 150 volunteers are being pressed into action, according to the dean.“Just the Secret Service needs alone can be immense,” Hollerith said. “Shutting down streets, sweeping the buildings hours ahead, days ahead sometimes. It will involve 250 folks from the media. You’ve got lines of people outside with security getting guests in. It’s a ticketed, private event, only because the cathedral is only so large.”Hollerith expects that 2,500 people or more will attend.Even at that scale, the dean said, the funeral is still a funeral like the many done in the cathedral each year, for the famous and not-so-famous. As in any congregation, some preparations can be done in advance, either by the family or by the person who wants to be “well prepared,” in the dean’s words. Then, after the death of a loved one, the family works out the timing of the service. He did not say how much preplanning has gone into the McCain funeral. The New York Times reported Aug. 29 that McCain actively helped plan this week’s services.“What happens here that you can’t prepare for are the logistics involved in a service like this because of who may attend, who may be involved in speaking and when the event will happen,” he said.The Arizona Republic newspaper in Phoenix devoted its front page to John McCain the day after his death. Photo: Newseum Front PagesThe McCain family  announced that that tributes will be offered by former Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, as well as by former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, former Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Meghan McCain, one of the senator’s daughters. The Rev. Edward A. Reese, president of St. Ignatius College Preparatory in San Francisco will preach.Hollerith, Diocese of Washington Bishop Mariann Budde and the Rev. Jan Cope, cathedral provost, also will participate. The details of the service made public so far are here.The dean said that it is an honor for the cathedral to host such services. “It is an opportunity to honor a grieving family and to help a grieving nation,” he said. Hollerith added that it is also an opportunity to show the Episcopal Church at its best with powerful and comforting liturgy.The order of service is here.The service will be live-streamed here.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on Aug. 26 called McCain “a witness to the nobility of living not for self alone but for the ideals and values that make for a better world.”The nation says good-bye and honors McCainA series of ceremonies to mark the passing of McCain will begin Aug. 29 when his body will lie in state in the Arizona Capitol. A private service at 10 a.m. will be followed by six hours of public viewing. The next day, a memorial service is set for 10 a.m. at North Phoenix Baptist Church.McCain’s body will then be flown to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, just outside of Washington, D.C., in preparation for lying in state in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Aug. 31. A ceremony will take place at approximately 11 a.m. ET, and then a Capitol Hill Guard of Honor will preside as members of the public pay their respects from 2 to 8 p.m.The cathedral service is the next day, and McCain will be buried Sept. 2 at the U.S. Naval Academy Cemetery in Annapolis, Maryland, next to his Naval Academy classmate and lifelong friend, Adm. Chuck Larson, following a private service in the academy’s chapel.Hints of the faith life of John McCainMcCain was baptized an Episcopalian and was the great-grandson of an Episcopal priest. However, for the last 27 years he has worshipped at North Phoenix Baptist Church.It appears that McCain never became a member of the church, which like all Baptist-affiliated churches requires full-immersion baptism. Ten years ago, then-pastor Dan Yeary told the Baptist Global News website that he had “dialogued” McCain, then in his second bid to become president, about such a baptism. (Episcopalians believe that a person who has been baptized at any age with water in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit does not need subsequent re-baptism.)McCain spent five and a half years as a POW in North Vietnam, a time that included torture and extended periods of isolation, some of it because he was the son of the admiral who commanded the war in the Pacific. In a 1973 essay for U.S. News and World Report, he wrote that he prayed not for “superhuman strength or for God to strike the North Vietnamese dead” but for “moral and physical courage, for guidance and wisdom to do the right thing.”“I asked for comfort when I was in pain, and sometimes I received relief. I was sustained in many times of trial.”Then-President Richard Nixon greets John McCain upon returning home after his 1973 release from captivity in North Vietnam. Photo: Office of Sen. John McCainIn 2007, he told the Christian Science Monitor, “There were times when I didn’t pray for one more day or one more hour, but I prayed for one more minute. So, I have very little doubt that it was reliance on someone stronger than me that not only got me through but got me through honorably.”The Monitor reported that McCain helped run what it called a “covert church.” Orson Swindle, who spent the last 20 months of his captivity with McCain said that every Sunday, after the midday meal was finished, the dishes were washed and the guards had departed, the senior officer in the area would signal that it was time to pray together, by coughing in a way that signaled the letter “c” for church – one cough and then three coughs.Swindle said the signal was the call for “a solid stream of thought among those of us there” during which the men in their separate cells silently said the Pledge of Allegiance, the 23rd Psalm, the Lord’s Prayer, “and anything else you’d want to [say] in there that would get us some help – but not out loud. If we were heard talking, they would come in and start torturing us.”Toward the end of the war, the North Vietnamese put the POWs together in a room, and the prisoners were able to have organized Sunday church services. McCain said he became a chaplain “not because the senior ranking officer thought I was imbued with any particular extra brand of religion, but because I knew all of the words of the Apostles’ Creed and the Nicene Creed.”McCain said he conducted the services and gave a short talk. “We had a choir that was marvelous. … The guy who directed it happened to have been previously the director of the Air Force Academy choir,” he said.George “Bud” Day, a fellow POW, told Religion News Service, that McCain “was a very good preacher, much to my surprise. He could remember all of the liturgy from the Episcopal services … word for word.”McCain recalled the first Christmas the prisoners were allowed to have a service together. Some of the men had been held for seven years. The North Vietnamese handed McCain a King James Bible, a piece of paper and a pencil. He jotted down bits of the nativity story from Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. He read parts of the story in between Christmas hymns.“We got to the point where we talked about the birth of Christ, and then sang ‘Silent Night,’ and I still remember looking at the faces of those guys – skinny, worn out – but most of them, a lot of them, had tears down their faces,” McCain told the Monitor. “And they weren’t sorrow, they were happiness that for the first time in so many years we were able to worship together.”In his book “Faith of My Fathers,” the senator said that service “was more sacred to me than any service I had attended in the past, or any service I have attended since.”McCain also recalled a Christmas Day when he was allowed to stand outside for 10 minutes in a courtyard. A guard came beside him and then drew a cross in the dirt with his sandal and stood there for a minute, looking at McCain silently. A few minutes later he rubbed it out and walked away, McCain recalled. This was the same guard who a few months earlier had come to his cell one night to loosen the ropes that held McCain’s arms behind his back in a painful position.In an essay titled “The Moment I Came to Love My Enemy,” McCain called this guard his Good Samaritan and said that in that courtyard “for just that moment I forgot all my hatred for my enemies, and all the hatred most of them felt for me. … I forgot about the war, and the terrible things that war does to you. I was just one Christian venerating the cross with a fellow Christian on Christmas morning.”McCain also recounted the role of his faith and of communal worship during those years here.Diocese of Arizona Bishop Kirk Smith told ENS that he knew McCain from two perspectives. As a policymaker, the senator met with Smith at least three times to discuss immigration, a controversial topic in the state. “He was very down to earth and receptive and wanted to hear what we thought,” Smith said. “He was a good listener.”Once, on the spur of the moment, Smith invited McCain to come to an interfaith meeting on immigration south of Phoenix. Surprisingly for a man whose schedule was often made months ahead, the senator was free that afternoon and came.“He was very well loved and respected in Arizona, even though some people disagreed with him,” Smith said. “I disagreed with him on a lot of things, but people admired his character and his forthrightness.”Smith recalled McCain’s sometimes-changing stance on immigration, but he also recounted a story that McCain told to explain why he eventually favored amnesty for immigrants. The senator had gone to a naturalization ceremony and had seen empty seats in the front row with combat boots in front of each chair. They represented soldiers who had died in action while they were in the process of becoming United States citizens. “That was the thing that pushed him over,” Smith said. “He said, if these young men were willing to give their lives for this country, why aren’t we making them citizens.”The soldiers were posthumously made citizens, Smith said.Smith also knew McCain by way of the senator’s aunt, his mother’s identical twin sister, who was a parishioner of his at St. James’ Church in Los Angeles. He would remind McCain of that connection, Smith said, and that led to swapping of stories.McCain attended Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Virginia. While at the school, McCain was influenced by English teacher and football coach William Ravenel. “I worshipped him,” said McCain, according to Robert Timberg’s “John McCain: An American Odyssey.” “He saw something in me that others did not. And he took a very personal interest in me and we spent a good deal of time together. He had a very important influence on my life.”Diocese of California Bishop Marc Andrus recalled on Aug. 27 that he heard McCain speak twice at Episcopal High School while Andrus was the school’s chaplain. The senator said that, as a student, he was not happy about the school’s compulsory chapel services.“During those daily services that I imagine not only bored but frustrated McCain, something unexpected happened: he memorized prayers, parts of psalms, and other spiritual resources that he says sustained him and others during his almost six years of imprisonment in Vietnam during the Vietnam War,” Andrus wrote.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Featured Jobs & Calls Faith & Politics, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Update: Washington National Cathedral prepares to help family, nation honor McCain Funeral will be one of a host of memorials to mark the war hero senator’s life Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events John McCain Rector Knoxville, TN mfschjonberg says: August 29, 2018 at 10:52 am Thank you Mary Frances for this story of John McCain’s faith journey. He was a shipmate and fellow Naval Aviator that flew in service to his country and his beloved US Navy. Having a narrative of his testament for Christian witness while a prisoner of war is an invaluable example of the power of faith that can sustain us no matter how adverse a situation we may be experiencing. August 29, 2018 at 9:16 pm Thank you for this lovely, loving piece. The ending is striking. Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Submit an Event Listing Dan C Tootle says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 29, 2018 at 3:29 pm Thanks so much, Dan. I never knew that about you and Sen. McCain. The stories you must have! Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC August 30, 2018 at 8:33 am Powerful story, Mary Frances. Thank you for this wonderful tribute to Sen. McCain. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Pat Yankus says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Susan M. Paynter says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

Anglican Consultative Council elects one of its new youth members…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Anglican Communion, Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Consultative Council Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Posted May 6, 2019 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Consultative Council elects one of its new youth members to the Standing Committee Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN [Anglican Communion News Service] On the final morning  (May 4) of the formal meetings of the 17th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council (ACC-17) in Hong Kong, three new members have been elected to the Standing Committee including, for the first time, a youth member. The three are, Basetsana Makena, Anglican Church of Southern Africa; Joyce Haji Liundi Anglican Church of Tanzania; and Hosam Elias Naoum, the Episcopal Church of Jerusalem and the Middle East. Makena was attending her first ACC meeting as one of the new regional Youth Members, representing the continent of Africa.Read the entire article here. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK ACC17, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

Episcopal task force educates New Yorkers on what’s at stake…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal task force educates New Yorkers on what’s at stake in decriminalizing prostitution State-level legislation ignites national conversation Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Port Authority Bus Terminal served as the first station on April 6, 2019, for Stations of the Cross for Sex Trafficking Survivors, an event of the Episcopal Diocese of New York Task Force Against Human Trafficking. The task force is now working to educate the public on a bill introduced in the New York State Assembly that would decriminalize prostitution. Photo: Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] At least three U.S. states and the District of Columbia have introduced legislation that would decriminalize the buying and selling of sex, forcing a long-simmering debate on prostitution into the national dialogue.Legalization proponents, religious or not, often cite biblical references to prostitution dating back to ancient Israel, telling the Genesis story of Judah and Tamar, and falling back on the well-worn phrase, the “world’s oldest profession.” Opponents tend to argue the “profession” leads to an increase in violence against women and girls and reflects men’s power over women.“I consider prostitution not the oldest profession, but the oldest oppression,” said the Rev. Adrian Dannhauser, a longtime sex and labor trafficking victims’ rights advocate who leads the Episcopal Diocese of New York’s Task Force Against Human Trafficking. “I think this decriminalization issue is a backlash against women’s rights and progress we’ve made in terms of equality. It’s a power issue and an entitlement issue.”In late June, at the close of the New York State General Assembly’s 2019 legislative session, three New York City lawmakers introduced a bill that would decriminalize prostitution and legalize the sale of consensual sex. Massachusetts, Maine and Washington, D.C., have introduced similar bills.During Lent, the Episcopal Diocese of New York Task Force Against Human Trafficking led a Stations of the Cross for Sex Trafficking Survivors event in New York City. Writing in the summer 2019 issue of The Episcopal New Yorker, Dannhauser said: “Sex workers’ rights organizations claim that consenting adults should be allowed to do whatever they want with their own bodies – ‘my body, my choice.’ But in most cases, prostitution is more aptly described as ‘my body, his choice.’ It’s not sexual liberation but sexual exploitation. According to Sanctuary for Families, New York’s leading service provider and advocate for survivors of gender violence, 90% of people in prostitution in the U.S. are trafficking victims. This means that only 10% of prostituted people have any real choice in what happens to their bodies in the sex trade.”Both sides find common ground in calling for the decriminalization of people bought and sold in the commercial sex industry and for the ability of trafficking survivors to vacate their convictions. Opponents of the decriminalization of prostitution typically favor an “equality” model that focuses more on decreasing demand and preventing exploitation, similar to those adopted in Nordic countries, where cultural attitudes have shifted and it’s becoming no longer socially acceptable to purchase people for sex and it’s seen as a barrier to gender equality.In the United States, the decriminalization conversation has shifted in the context of the #MeToo movement; alongside an awareness of sexual violence on college campuses; and amid the backdrop of high-profile sex crime cases, like those involving New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, who allegedly paid for sexual services at a Florida massage parlor, and financier and convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, who stands accused of trafficking underage girls and paying them to perform sex acts.“It’s not about legislating morality, it’s about social context,” said Dannhauser, in an interview with Episcopal News Service in her office at the Church of the Incarnation on Madison Avenue in Manhattan. “It’s a backlash against women’s rights, and it’s an empowerment and entitlement issue … the whole idea of rape culture on college campuses. “It’s finally coming into the light.”In late July, the Church of the Incarnation, where Dannhauser serves as associate rector, hosted a Tuesday evening panel discussion to educate the public on the bill. As the Episcopal church’s sanctuary filled with some men but mostly women from diverse backgrounds, a small group of bill supporters gathered in protest on the sidewalk outside, as police officers stood watch nearby.The four-person panel of opponents – two sex trafficking survivors, an activist and educator, and an activist lawyer – shared personal stories and talked about the bill’s specifics. New York Assembly Member Richard N. Gottfried, a bill co-sponsor whose district includes Incarnation, had agreed to participate but later rescinded saying the venue wasn’t “neutral.” Toward the end of the event, the protesters from outside entered the sanctuary and disrupted the gathering.Legalization advocates say that decriminalization would protect people who “do sexual labor by choice, circumstance, coercion,” and they call for legislation that would protect people in the sex trade from economic exploitation and interpersonal violence. They also call for people imprisoned on sex-trade related offenses to be freed and for the de-stigmatization of the sex trade.Bill opponents, however, say it would thwart prosecution of sex and child traffickers, pimps who prostitute children and pimping in general; permit pimping of anyone 18 years of age or older; allow traffickers to vacate convictions; inhibit prosecutors’ trafficking investigations; and make it harder for law enforcement to identify victims. They are also concerned that the bill would legalize the purchase of sex, brothels and commercial sex establishments, and encourage sex tourism.“We [New York residents] have to ask ourselves, Why do we need people buying sex? What is that all about?” said Yvonne O’Neal, a task force member. “Personally – and it does keep me up at night sometimes – I’m wondering when I go to church on Sunday, as a person of faith, as an Episcopalian, and I look around in the congregation, my question is, Who are these men that are buying sex? And obviously, they have to be some of them sitting in the pews. Who are they? We don’t know, and why is that necessary?”Proponents of decriminalization say that “if we need to,” people should be able to sell their bodies, and that legalization will lead to safer working conditions and industry regulations. Opponents say it will lead to higher demand and an increase in child sex trafficking as men look to purchase sex from younger and younger girls.“There are some people in the trade who say, ‘Well, you, know, this is what I choose,’ and I don’t doubt that, but the vast majority of women who have to sell their bodies, I don’t think they are doing it voluntarily,” said O’Neal, who also represents The Episcopal Church at the United Nations as a member of the NGO Committee to Stop Trafficking in Persons. “We should be able to find ways to help them to make a different kind of living and not have to subject their bodies to this.”During the panel discussion at Incarnation, Iryna Makaruk, a sex trafficking survivor challenged the theory that sex work is work.“It’s not work; you’re not selling yourself, you’re sold,” she said.“There are girls being sold all over in run-down apartments, and they are being raped like I was,” said Makaruk, who was 19 and living in Brooklyn when a trafficker lured her in. “Shame on us if that’s how are girls are making money.”– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of Episcopal News Service. Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By Lynette WilsonPosted Aug 6, 2019 Human Trafficking Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Hate attacks, harassment of Asian Americans surge during COVID-19 pandemic

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ethnic Ministries, Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Submit a Press Release COVID-19, Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA A woman wears a face mask as she walks in New York’s Chinatown on March 17, 2020, during the height of the city’s COVID-19 outbreak. Photo: Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS[Episcopal News Service] When Sharon Matsushige Crandall coughed in a Los Angeles-area store a few months ago, another customer challenged her, asking “whether I had been out of the country recently. It didn’t even dawn on me, really, until afterward, what she meant by that,” Crandall said.In the racially charged COVID-19 climate, Crandall and other Americans of Asian and Pacific islands’ descent say simply coughing evokes fears of being targeted and scapegoated – and has been used as a weapon of aggression against them.“A good friend of mine who’s Chinese American was walking in his Oakland neighborhood when someone snuck up behind him and coughed on him,” the Rev. Peter Huang, Asian American missioner in the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles told Episcopal News Service. “The person was angry and tried to confront him. My friend chose to just run away. He was two houses away from his home in his own neighborhood.”The Gathering was among 34 ministries funded by The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council at its October 2019 meeting. The grants were for new church starts and Mission Enterprise Zones. The Gathering’s $20,000 grant was one of 11 seed grants.Further information is available here.Huang is a team leader for The Gathering, a Diocese of Los Angeles ministry that provides space for Asian Pacific Americans to gather in storytelling and shared experience, with a focus on spirituality and social justice. In late April, The Gathering hosted a webinar to talk about what it means to be of Asian and Pacific islands’ descent in the age of COVID-19 and to raise awareness of the blame and hate directed at Asian Pacific Americans for their perceived spreading of the coronavirus. (Click here to view a recording of the webinar.)In just one month, 1,500 incidents of verbal harassment, workplace and other discrimination, and hate crimes were documented against Asian and Pacific Islander Americans, Russell Jeung told webinar participants.Jeung, chair and professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University, a webinar speaker, helped launch a website, Stop Asian American Pacific Islander Hate in March 2020 to document COVID-19 associated attacks. He believes the incidents are just the tip of the iceberg.“We had reports from 45 states, of Asian Americans sharing their own personal experiences,” Jeung said. “Being coughed and spat upon is unique to this pandemic. People see us as being disease-carriers,” he said.“The hatred is virulent, palpable and disturbing, very dehumanizing. It is just a matter of time before an Asian American dies because of it.”The Rev. Fred Vergara, The Episcopal Church’s missioner for Asiamerica Ministries, said the situation is also heartbreaking because Asian Americans are on the front lines fighting the virus.“Asian Americans compose 15% of health care professionals and health care providers … saving lives and risking being exposed to the virus while working in hospitals” yet are also exposed to racial insults and violent threats because of it, Vergara told ENS.The coronavirus, a novel virus that causes the disease COVID-19, was first detected in Wuhan, China, in December. It has since spread worldwide, killing more than 257,000 people and infecting 3.7 million. President Donald Trump has repeatedly referred to the coronavirus as the “Chinese virus” in efforts to deflect blame for his administration’s handling of the outbreak. Trump’s inflammatory political rhetoric and the United States’ history of racism and discrimination against Asian Americans and Asian-born Americans have led to a rise in hate speech and hate crimes against Americans of Asian descent.“Every time a national or local politician says it’s the Chinese virus – knowing full well that there are not many people who are going to distinguish the Chinese government from all Chinese people – then thousands of people across the country have to look over their shoulders when they get out of their cars,” Brant Lee, assistant dean of diversity and social justice initiatives at the University of Akron School of Law in Ohio, told ENS.The issue is further complicated by a long history of racism against Asian Americans. With the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the U.S. Congress passed the first restrictive immigration law at a time when Americans on the West Coast were concerned about white racial purity and blamed Asians and Asian Americans – who represented about 2% of the population – for a faltering economy and declining wages. That history continues to foster a perception that Asian Americans identify with Asian countries and not the United States, Lee said.“I am a fifth-generation American. My great-great-grandparents on my mom’s side came to the United States in the 1850s. Yet, I still take pains to pronounce my words, knowing there will always be people wondering if they will be able to understand my accent,” said Lee, 58, who is a member of Cleveland’s Trinity Cathedral and the General Convention Task Force on the Theology of Social Justice Advocacy, and serves as an antiracism trainer for the Diocese of Ohio.Racial profiling and ethnic stereotypes are insidious and create both hypervigilance and self-doubt, he said.“I’m trying to do the right thing, so I’m going to wear a mask. An Asian guy wearing a mask in Ohio – I cannot not be self-aware of that,” Lee said. “It’s not like I think about it every second, but I think about it several times. Every trip I make to get out of my car at the supermarket, I wonder, what is that person thinking?“You just can’t calculate it,” he added. “You don’t know if you’re being paranoid. You blame yourself. Then you read about something that did happen. You wonder if it’s just a few crazy people. Then you read that 42% of the people still support the president. It creates a lot of uncertainty.”For the Rev. Peggy Lo, assistant rector of St. Chrysostom’s Episcopal Church in Chicago, Illinois, the coronavirus and resultant stay-at-home orders have engendered a keen sense of vulnerability.“When I’m out, I’m really self-conscious because I know the history of reactions against Asian Americans, especially when things happen in Asian countries,” Lo, 40, told ENS.As an example, she cited a recent social media post that referred to U.S. Rep. Ted Lieu of California, a Taiwanese-born American and U.S. military veteran, as “an agent of China.”“I really feel defensive when I’m out in public and turn more inward, trying not to engage,” Lo said. “I have my hood on, my earphones, I just don’t want to leave myself open to the things I read about.”In a March 10 statement, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry called on Episcopalians to remember, “We are in this together.”“We are all part of a big family. Bigger than our biological families, bigger than our immediate families, bigger than our congregations, bigger than our dioceses, bigger than our cities, our states, our nation,” Curry said. “We are part of the human family of God. Jesus came to show us that his way of love is the way of life. It’s God’s human family.”Similarly, The Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations issued a statement on March 20, both calling on the federal government to aid the vulnerable of all nations and decrying political rhetoric leading to attacks on Asian Americans.“Many of our brothers and sisters of Asian-descent, including immigrants from Asia have been harassed or attacked since COVID-19 broke out. President Trump’s description of the coronavirus as a ‘foreign virus’ during his [March 11] Oval Office address only exacerbates the perception that ‘foreigners’ are responsible for the outbreak. We denounce all displays of racism and stigmatization and encourage everyone to practice welcome and inclusion,” the statement read.The Rev. Erin Betz Shank, 35, vicar of Trinity Episcopal Church, in New Castle, Pennsylvania, in the Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania told ENS that she has felt a responsibility as a church leader to call out the president’s racist remarks as well as his anti-immigration policies.Calling COVID-19 the “‘Chinese virus’ was personally very offensive,” she said. Shank was born in Seoul, South Korea, and adopted by an American family when she was 7 months old. “I’m not Chinese … but as a person of Asian descent, I just don’t think it is necessary to make that distinction.”“Leadership requires you to think carefully about the words you are using and the ramifications that your words as a leader have on other people, negatively or positively,” Shank said. “Unfortunately, we are seeing the ramifications of his words throughout the country.”During the panel, Jeung said the church’s responsibility is to resist the world’s labels and to raise awareness of their resultant hurt and damage – especially to Asian American youth – who are encouraged “to shun their Asian-ness, the way others shun us.”Dr. Joseph Lee, a psychiatrist from Redondo Beach, California, also served as a panelist during the April 24 webinar. Developing empathy, exercising compassion and building alliances are ways to address the challenges, using the core Christian tenet of “making an unjust world more just,” he said. “Theology is not just talking about personal salvation, but also about empowering the principles of a loving, justice-oriented God … in a very grounded way here and now, a kingdom-on-earth kind of way as opposed to an esoteric in heaven kind of way.”Such efforts could begin with collective advocacy to address the higher death rate from COVID-19 among African Americans and unemployment disparities among Latinos, he said.Jeung said education and advocacy are crucial, especially since “China-bashing and the state of U.S.-China relations will continue and be used as a campaign issue” in the upcoming presidential election.“The issue is, how do we distinguish between criticizing the Chinese government yet not attacking Chinese people and Asian Americans in the United States? If the Chinese government becomes the enemy, then Asians in America become the enemy – that’s the threat. As Christians, how do you flip the narrative?”Creating awareness begins by promoting a multiplicity of voices, Lee said.“People of color have an understanding of racism, not on an intellectual level but through a lived experience,” he said. “If it’s something you take seriously, you have to let people of color lead. Racial dynamics are also about power differentials. It’s a big ask, but it’s the right answer.”Jeung added that all Christians must stand up for justice. “A lot of white people hear more racist stuff about Asians than I would. That’s the occasion to stand up.”Other ways, he said, include collectively holding local and federal governments and politicians accountable for investigating hate crimes and guaranteeing the public safety and civil rights of all citizens, and voting for those who embody “the Christian values of justice, dignity and reconciliation.”Ultimately, Jeung said, each Christian must ask, “How is God using this time, and each of us, to respond well?’– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group By Pat McCaughanPosted May 8, 2020 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Health & Healthcare Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Hate attacks, harassment of Asian Americans surge during COVID-19 pandemic Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

Episcopal Migration Ministries issues response to Biden’s executive orders

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service] President Joe Biden signed three more executive orders on Feb. 2 aimed at reversing Trump administration immigration policies. The three orders cover a range of immigration issues, from ending the former administration’s “remain in Mexico” policy for asylum-seekers to reuniting migrant families who were separated at the border.Episcopal Migration Ministries issued the following statement on Feb. 3 in response to the executive orders.Episcopal Migration Ministries commends the administration’s executive orders to restore the U.S. asylum system, reunify families, address root causes of forced migration, and promote integration of New Americans.“At this critical point in time, when there are over 79.5 million people forcibly displaced from their homes, it is imperative that the U.S. reclaim its leadership role on migration issues and continue its long history of being a nation of welcome,” said Demetrio Alvero, Director of Operations for Episcopal Migration Ministries. “Welcoming New Americans is a community effort that brings us together, reminds us of our essential values, and creates a sense of shared hope.”Episcopal Migration Ministries, the refugee resettlement and immigration ministry of The Episcopal Church, has proudly assisted new Americans for over eight decades. This ministry builds a foundation for individuals forced from home and country to thrive in communities across the United States. Churches, faith-based organizations, local organizations, and individual volunteers make up the fabric of this dynamic community-building program. To learn more about this life-saving ministry and how you can help, visit www.episcopalmigrationministries.org. Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries issues response to Biden’s executive orders Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Posted Feb 3, 2021 last_img read more

Breaking News: Deputies surround barricaded suspect in Apopka

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 TAGSBreaking NewsOrange County Sheriff’s Office Previous articleA grieving community honors the life of “Big Norm”Next articleA horrible week in Central Florida makes its way to Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Breaking NewsFrom the Orange County Sheriff’s OfficeThe Orange County Sheriff’s Department is dealing with a barricaded suspect in Apopka near the intersection of Binion and Boy Scout Roads officials said. According to Captain Angelo Nieves of the OCSO the incident is not related to the manhunt of Markeith Loyd. The suspect barricaded himself in an Apopka home. There is a large police presence at the scene according to witnesses.No other details are known at this time. This is a breaking story. As more information is known, The Apopka Voice will update this article.last_img read more

Apopka High School announces Drama Department Officers

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSApopka High School Drama Department Previous articleApopka Police Officer Photo Shoot goes viralNext articleAlert dog walker helps APD make vehicle burglary arrests Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Drama Department seeking benefactors and advertisersThe Apopka High School Drama Department is proud to announce this year’s officers (from left to right in the photo):Jaalah Simpson, Freshman RepresentativeCatalina Sandoval, TreasurerMatthew Zenon, Vice PresidentMax Kelly, PresidentLiza Brown, SecretaryZach Williams, Master TechnicianLeah Riley, HistorianThese officers will be part of Apopka High School Drama’s upcoming year which will include two main stage shows; three Hoka Ha: A Night of Improv performances; Student Produced Works; an Elementary School Tour; and participation in District 5 Thespians and International Cappies.In the next few weeks many Drama students will be asking for benefactors and advertisers.See you at the theatre. Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Velazquez defines her role on City Council as building unity, and…

first_img The Anatomy of Fear April 10, 2018 at 12:18 pm Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Okay, we went to vote out at NWRC this morning around 10:30 am, and I saw both candidate’s supporters out there, and Commissioner Velazquez standing around out there in the parking lot, and it was thundering and was some keen lightning happening, and it is still lightning bad right now…..you all please be careful out there, in that open field, and up at the VFW too, it is dangerous to be standing around out in that lightning with umbrellas! I know you both want to win, but be careful, and stay out of that lightning!…It is not worth it to get struck with a bolt! Good luck to you both on the runoff……… 1 COMMENT Please enter your comment! Decision Apopka 2018Apopka City Commission Candidate Feature: Seat #2 Commissioner Diane VelazquezCommissioner Diane Velazquez has a heart for Apopka. She has been a consistent voice for unity in the city as well as on the City Council. If there is an event in Apopka, she is most likely in attendance.In 2014, Velazquez burst onto the Apopka political scene with a surprising victory over 18-year incumbent Marilyn Ustler-McQueen with 55% of the vote. Her margin of victory was the largest in that election cycle – outperforming both Apopka Mayor Joe Kilsheimer and Commissioner Sam Ruth, who were both eventual winners in runoffs.Apopka City Commissioner Diane VelazquezAnd after becoming a commissioner, she immediately began to define its role.“It’s more than just reviewing and deciding on new city projects, proposals, city charter changes, and any other issues the city and its residents may face in the ever-changing future of our city.  Additionally, the role of a city commissioner is to make decisions on facts and taking into consideration the needs of the community at large. When I say, “More than just decision making,” It’s my opinion that commissioners need to be in contact with the community at all times.  A commissioner needs to attend community meetings, attend organizational meetings and gatherings, attend school functions and church services.  I have been invited to many church services in our community and I have attended almost all the services that I was invited to.  Staying in touch with the residents, business people and others that visit and are in contact with our city is a very important part of being a city commissioner.”Velazquez is challenged by Leroy Bell, Alicia Koutsoulieris, and Alice Nolan for her re-election to the Apopka City Commission Seat #2, and in this race, she is drawing on her experiences both as an Apopka resident and in her previous career.Velazquez is a retired New York City Police detective who achieved the rank of Detective 2nd Grade, serving as a medical insurance fraud investigator for the agency. During her career, she attended and successfully completed several investigative courses within the agency. She also attended weekend college courses at Nassau Community College, in Long Island.She has been actively involved in the community since moving to Apopka in April of 2005. She is married to Ed Velazquez, who is also a retired law enforcement officer and a Vietnam veteran. One of Velazquez’s two sons, Samuel, is a police officer and also served overseas with the U.S. Army in Iraq and Afghanistan. Velazquez has also served as a volunteer in school and sporting events for her two young grandchildren.She is proud of her role on the City Council and her public service to the community, but perhaps her most cherished moment was her effort to obtain an artifact of one of the original Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, which was in assistance for Apopka Boy Scout Christian Lamphere’s Eagle Scout project. In just a few months, she was awarded one of the last remaining artifacts. Her husband Ed drove to New York City to bring it to Apopka, where it was unveiled to the public as part of Lamphere’s 9/11 Memorial at City Hall on September 11, 2016.Commissioner Diane Velazquez: “It’s more than just reviewing and deciding on new city projects, proposals, city charter changes, and any other issues the city and its residents may face in the ever-changing future of our city. Staying in touch with the residents, business people and others that visit and are in contact with our city is a very important part of being a city commissioner.”“It changed my life and it changed my husband’s life,” said Velazquez, referring to 9/11. “We can never forget the events that happened that day. This project has brought our community together for a very special remembrance of September 11th and galvanized a patriotic spirit in everyone involved. To see how bright our future is, you just need to see how this community came together to make a boy scout’s dream come true. When confronted with obstacles, he found a way around them. He challenged all of us. He challenged me. His persistence has given us strength. And we have to remain a united community.”She was also excited to play a role in bringing Apopka Fire Station #5 online in 2018. “For me, this is such a crowning glory,” she said at its grand opening. “I have been involved with the fire department from the very beginning. And to see it come to fruition… to actually see it become a reality is very emotional for me. I absolutely love our first responders. As a retired and former first responder, I understand what it is to serve and so to get this fire station finished is a blessing. I thank each and every one of you who served here.”Velazquez is also an advocate for the economic development in Apopka.“As I have stated many times before, Apopka is a growing community. Its location makes it a favorable and attractive place for families that want to settle here. Not only are they setting roots in Apopka, but businesses are following the growth trend. This trend will affect Apopka and Central Florida as a whole for many years to come.”No matter the outcome, Velazquez will continue to be in service to the community, and a champion of unity in Apopka. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replycenter_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name here Mama Mia Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSCommissioner Diane VelazquezDecision Apopka 2018 Previous articleDrivers should expect to pay more at the pump this springNext articleNolan continues to surprise Apopka with Seat #2 run Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Carl Hayman suspended for four weeks for Zee Ngwenya spear tackle

first_imgFriday May 25, 2012 Carl Hayman suspended for four weeks for Zee Ngwenya spear tackle Former All Black Carl Hayman will miss Toulon’s Top 14 play-off game against Racing Metro this weekend after he was suspended for four weeks by an ERC disciplinary committee earlier today. If Toulon make the final, he will be unavailable for selection. Prop Hayman commmitted the dangerous tackle on Biarritz wing Takudzwa Ngwenya during the Amlin Challenge Cup final last Friday night. He was immediately shown a yellow card by referee Wayne Barnes, with onlookers and commentators surprised by the leniency of the decision.He lifted and tipped the USA flyer in a tackle that had all the ingredients to be a red card sending off. Independant judicial officer Christopher Quinlan felt the same way, deciding the offence warranted a mid-range entry point of a six week suspension.Hayman accepted that he was wrong to commit the tackle, but insisted it was a yellow card offence only. Quinlan disagreed, but took three weeks off due to Hayman’s good record and character, then added one as a deterrent for dangerous tackling.He will miss the knockout stages of the Top 14 due to the ban, of which the first three weeks will expire on June 10, the day after the Top 14 final. Another week will be served during Toulon’s pre-season period, when they play a fixture in late July.ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Big Hits & Dirty Play Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO Suspensions handed down after testicle grabbing… 26 WEEKS AGO The ‘double ruffle’ splits opinion with fans… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: The nastiest and most brutal moments… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life Reports30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Recent Comments