Tribute to press freedom martyr on third anniversary of murder

first_img News News Lebanon : Violence against reporters becoming more frequent in Lebanon News December 12, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Tribute to press freedom martyr on third anniversary of murder RSF_en News LebanonMiddle East – North Africa Organisation February 4, 2021 Find out more November 11, 2020 Find out more Reporters Without Borders appeals to the United Nations to help bring Gebran Tueni’s murderers to justice. A parliamentarian and publisher of one of the Middle-East’s leading Arabic-language dailies, Tueni was killed in a targeted car-bombing in the Beirut suburb of Mkalles three years ago today. Follow the news on Lebanon Lebanese journalist found shot dead in car Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders appeals to the United Nations to help bring Gebran Tueni’s murderers to justice. A parliamentarian and publisher of one of the Middle East’s leading Arabic-language dailies, Tueni was killed in a targeted car-bombing in the Beirut suburb of Mkalles three years ago today.“We join the Tueni family and all of An-Nahar’s staff in voicing our deep grief and in paying tribute to this leading journalist’s memory,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Like his colleague Samir Kassir, who was murdered in May 2005, Tueni confronted the serious threats to which he was exposed in Lebanon and paid for his commitment with his life.”The press freedom organisation added: “Three years later, his killers are still at large and Reporters Without Borders appeals to the United Nations to take drastic measures to expose the identity of those who murdered him.”Lebanon was shaken by a series of high-profile political killings in 2005 beginning with former prime minister Rafik Hariri’s assassination on 14 February. An-Nahar editorialist and intellectual Samir Kassir was killed outside his home in the Beirut district of Ashrafieh on 2 June by plastic explosives placed underneath his car.Tueni, An-Nahar’s CEO and parliamentary representative for Beirut, was killed on 12 December while being driven in convoy to the newspaper’s offices in the city centre. A car-bomb left at the side of the Mkalles road was set off as Tueni’s convoy drove by. Three other people were killed and 10 were seriously wounded.An outspoken advocate of press freedom in the Arab world and well known to the international media, Tueni was one of the leading architects of Lebanon’s Cedar Revolution and it was clear that his life was in danger, especially in the wake of Hariri’s assassination.The international tribunal that was tasked with investigating the Hariri assassination decided to extend its mandate to cover all of the high-profile political murders from the start of October 2004 if they appeared to be linked to Hariri’s death.An An-Nahar representative told Reporters Without Borders that the international investigation is continuing. She added that it is being conducted with complete secrecy and those in charge have not said whether they have learned anything about Tueni’s death.In Tueni’s memory, the World Association of Newspapers awards a Gebran Tueni Prize each year to an Arab newspaper editor or publisher. Help by sharing this information January 14, 2021 Find out more to go further Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” LebanonMiddle East – North Africa last_img read more

Imprisoned women journalists and netizens risking death

first_img News Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists IranMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts RSF_en After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists November 6, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Imprisoned women journalists and netizens risking death Help by sharing this information News to go further Organisation center_img News Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 June 9, 2021 Find out more IranMiddle East – North Africa February 25, 2021 Find out more March 18, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders is very worried about the state of health of eight women prisoners of conscience who began a hunger strike five days ago in protest against inhuman and degrading jail conditions. They include three journalists and netizens – Mahssa Amrabadi, Jila Bani Yaghoob and Shiva Nazar Ahari.The women are the victims of reprisals by the authorities in response to a joint statement on 31 October by Nobel peace laureate Shirin Ebadi and six human rights organizations including Reporters Without Borders, which voiced concern about the situation of women prisoners of conscience in Tehran’s Evin prison.A few hours after the statement’s release, female guards raided the women’s wing of Evin prison and spent hours inspecting the detainees’ personal effects. After finding no forbidden items, the guards began to search the detainees in a degrading manner and to mistreat them.It was in response to this humiliating treatment that the eight women – who also include Nazanin Dihami, Bahareh Hedayat, Nasim Soltanbighi, Hakimeh Shokriand and Jila Karam Zadeh Makvandi – began their human strike.Nasrin Sotoudeh, a jailed human rights lawyer who defended several imprisoned journalists, was meanwhile transferred to Section 209, Evin prison’s security wing, on 31 October, five days after the European Parliament announced it was awarding her this year’s Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought. Sotoudeh, who has been on hunger strike since 17 October, was also forbidden to receive visits for three weeks.“The Iranian authorities, especially the Islamic Republic’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, are responsible for the health and safety of all their detainees and we will hold them responsible for anything that happens to these women prisoners of conscience,” Reporters Without Borders said.“These women are not just serving long jail terms but are now also being subjected to humiliating and degrading treatment in flagrant violation of national and international laws. The international community must not remain silent in the face of the Islamic Republic’s many atrocities in its prisons.”While supporting their fight for the right to information and freedom of expression, Reporters Without Borders urges these women prisoners to abandon their hunger strike for fear that they could die. Follow the news on Iranlast_img read more

Riot police injure woman photographer during Athens demo

first_imgNews February 2, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Help by sharing this information Members of Greece’s MAT riot police injured photographer Tatiana Bolari during a demonstration in Athens yesterday, beating her legs and back with their riot shields although her equipment clearly identified her as a journalist. Another journalist was also beaten. Organisation Follow the news on Greece GreeceEurope – Central Asia Bolari, who had to be rushed to hospital for treatment to her injuries, had been covering a peaceful demonstration outside the finance ministry by about 50 maintenance employees in protest against a government decision to confirm their dismissal.In 2012, Bolari had been attacked by a member of MAT. The photo of the agression went around the world. The riot police also hit Marios Lolos, another journalist covering the protest. He told Reporters Without Borders: “We were on the grounds and the riot police walked on us. It lasted a good 30 minutes.”He added that there had been no need for the riot police to charge the protesters because the finance ministry was well protected, having “closed its doors and lowered steel curtains.” Lolos was hospitalized in 2012 for a serious head injury from a member of the MAT. A steel plate in his skull testifies to its gravity.“The behaviour of the riot police is intolerable,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The number of cases of MAT violence against journalists has kept on growing for years without any significant punishment being imposed to compensate the victims, and now a photographer is in hospital.“This kind of violence is carried out with complete impunity. The impunity must end, and journalists must be able to cover what is going out without fearing for their physical safety. We call on the police to investigate these two new cases and to punish those responsible.”The plight of Greece’s journalists keeps on getting worse. The economic crisis is steadily sapping the media and journalism. At demonstrations, riot police attack peaceful protesters, troublemakers and reporters without distinction. Journalists are often exposed to very aggressive behaviour by demonstrators themselves, as well as violence by the neo-Nazi party Gold Dawn. Assailed on all sides, they are unable to work properly.Greece was ranked 30th in the Reporters Without Borders press freedom index in 2007. It is now ranked 99th, the second lowest position of any European Union member country. News GreeceEurope – Central Asia to go further June 2, 2021 Find out more News The Greek police must show journalists can trust it with their protection after one was murdered and another is threatened June 13, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Riot police injure woman photographer during Athens demo Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU News April 29, 2021 Find out more Greece’s new guidelines for policing protests threaten press freedom Receive email alertslast_img read more

Reporters Without Borders urges Prime Minister to reform the kisha clubs system

first_img On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia Follow the news on Japan RSF urges recently appointed Japan Prime Minister to take a new turn towards press freedom Organisation “As all eyes are on Japan during the football World Cup, Reporters Without Borders (RSF – Reporters Sans Frontières) wishes to draw attention to the urgent need for reform of the kisha clubs (official press clubs) system, which is an obstacle to the freedom of the press in Japan”, says Robert Ménard, Secretary-General of Reporters Without Borders. He has called on Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to use his influence to turn the kisha clubs into press centres open to freelance journalists and foreign correspondents. “With thousands of foreign journalists in Japan to cover the World Cup, it is outrageous that correspondents of the foreign press should be excluded from most of these clubs, around which the whole media system has been structured for nearly fifty years”, Mr Ménard stresses.Experts date the creation of the first kisha club, in the “corridors of power” of the Japanese parliament, back to 1882. Ever since then, the various regimes have all encouraged these clubs, membership of which is restricted to certain journalists. Today at least 800 kisha clubs exist throughout the country. Most of them are attached to public institutions (ministries or provincial governments, for example), to the major corporations, political parties, or to the Imperial Palace. They number more than 12,000 journalists representing nearly 160 media organisations. On average, about 20 reporters in each kisha club are affiliated to the main daily newspapers, state television channels and news agencies (Kyodo and Jiji). The members of the club work as a pool of reporters, in offices provided for them by the institution.Freelance Japanese journalists and foreign correspondents are barred from most of the kisha clubs. Foreign correspondents are only allowed membership of the club attached to the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. As a result, these two categories of media professionals are denied access to certain news and information emanating from the principal government departments and major corporations.As Reporters Without Borders stated in its 2002 Annual Report, “The main obstacle to true freedom of the press in Japan remains kisha clubs (official press clubs). People are starting to speak out against this nepotistic system. On 15 May, Yasuo Tanaka, the reformist governor of Nagano province, announced that he was leaving the ‘kisha club system’. He refused to fund the province’s three clubs, and planned to create a press centre that would be accessible to all journalists. The sixteen media affiliated with the Nagano province kisha clubs denounced this decision and stated that it increased ‘the risks of information being manipulated’.” Since that date, the press centre has been open to all freelance or syndicated journalists, whether Japanese or foreign. This has however had the effect of putting Mr Tanaka, an independent politician, into the bad books of the Liberal Democratic Party, the party in power since 1955.In addition, the organisation has expressed its concern, in a letter to Prime Minster Junichiro Koizumi, about the possibilities of abusive application of the Bill on the protection of personal information, currently being examined by the Japanese parliament. “Protecting privacy is commendable, but we know from experience that this type of legislation also allows the freedom of the press to be restricted”, concludes Robert Ménard.According to information gathered by Reporters Without Borders, the National Diet (Japanese parliament) is due to examine the Bill on the protection of personal information before the close of the current legislative session on 19 June 2002. Under the proposed legislation all those, notably journalists, who collect personal information about other people, will at all times have to be able to show why they are gathering such information; to classify such information in a “suitable” manner; to ensure the veracity of such information; to prevent the dissemination of such information to a third party; and to ensure that the person under investigation always has transparent access to the information. In May 2001, Shinichi Sano, a well-known freelance journalist, launched a campaign against the Bill, which in his view represents a threat to the work of independent media professionals.The terms “suitable manner” and “personal information” are imprecisely defined in the text, for example. And Reporters Without Borders regrets that the Prime Minister has stated that he hopes for the support of the media in applying the legislation. News Japanese reporter held in Myanmar is charged with “false information” JapanAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information September 16, 2020 Find out more News Receive email alerts News RSF_en May 5, 2021 Find out more to go further May 30, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Reporters Without Borders urges Prime Minister to reform the kisha clubs system JapanAsia – Pacific November 19, 2020 Find out more News While thousands of foreign journalists are arriving in Japan to cover the World Cup, Reporters Without Borders condemns the kisha clubs system (official press clubs) as an obstacle to press freedom which needs urgent reforms. last_img read more

Veracruz-based journalist burgled twice, intimidation suspected

first_imgNews January 22, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Veracruz-based journalist burgled twice, intimidation suspected Help by sharing this information Organisation Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Reporters Without Borders fears for the safety of Andrés Timoteo Morales, the correspondent of the newspaper La Jornada in Veracruz, whose home was burgled twice, on 9 and 16 January, in what appears to have been an attempt to intimidate him. Morales, who was investigating a murder blamed on soldiers, has had to change residence. News News MexicoAmericas RSF_en 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Receive email alertscenter_img May 13, 2021 Find out more NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say May 5, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Mexico When two Veracruz state police officers came to his home on the morning of 16 January to investigate the burglary, “they explained that the burglars would have been better off taking the ceramic figures that were in the living room,” Morales told Reporters Without Borders. “When I returned home a few hours later, I was astonished to see that the ceramic figures had been stolen, along with a few other personal effects.”Morales added that, while at his home, the police did not carry out the usual investigations. He decided after this that he ought to change residence.Morales was one of the first journalists to write about the murder of Ernestina Ascencio, a member of the local Nahuatl indigenous community, on 26 February 2007, allegedly by soldiers who raped her first. After conducting an investigation in which two journalists, Rodrigo Vera and Regina Martínez of the weekly Proceso were asked to give statements, the Veracruz prosecutor’s office concluded that Ascencio was not raped and died of natural causes. The state judicial authorities have finally just reopened the case.Because of the alarming level of violence to which the Mexican media are exposed, senators who are members of the opposition Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI) this week requested that the head of the special federal prosecutor’s office for crimes against journalists (FEADP) should be summoned to appear before congress.The FEADP was created in February 2006 by the current government, headed by President Vicente Fox, but it lacks adequate resources and has made little headway in combatting impunity for crimes of violence against the media. to go further Reports MexicoAmericas Reporters Without Borders is very concerned about two burglaries at the home of Andrés Timoteo Morales, the correspondent of the newspaper La Jornada in the eastern city of Veracruz, on 9 and 16 January. Morales’ laptop and USB flash drive containing work files were stolen in the first of the two break-ins, which he regards as an attempt to intimidate him.“Morales’ account of the two burglaries suggest that the second was meant to deflect attention from the first, which was designed to obstruct his work,” the press freedom organisation said. “He has had to change his residence and he has good reason to fear for his safety. The Veracruz state authorities and the special federal prosecutor’s office for crimes against journalists should together do what is necessary to protect him and investigate the link between the burglaries and his work. Light also needs to be shed on a very sensitive case he has been covering.”The USB flash drive that was taken in the first break-in on 9 January contained his archives of all the reporting he had done from 2004 to 2007. Aside from that, and his laptop, the only things taken were a few items of no value. April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Open letter to the donor countries’ ambassadors regarding the situation of the media in Jaffna

first_img Sri Lanka: RSF signs joint statement on attacks against human rights defenders, lawyers and journalists to go further We look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience.Yours Sincerely, Members of the International Press Freedom and Freedom of Expression Mission to Sri LankaThose organisations associated with the International Mission include:ARTICLE 19FreeVoiceInternational Federation of Journalists (IFJ)International Media Support (IMS)International Press Institute (IPI)International News Safety Institute (INSI)Reporters Without Borders (RSF)South Asia Press Commission (SAPC)United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters (AMARC)World Association of Newspapers (WAN)World Press Freedom Committee (WPFC) January 13, 2021 Find out more As you will be aware, access to information is a key element in ensuring stability, and the lack thereof may lead to exaggerated rumour replacing accountable journalism as the main source of news for the local population, thereby fuelling instability and violence. We respectfully call on you to do everything possible to enable the delivery of newsprint to Jaffna so that the city’s publications are able to carry out their vital activity of informing the public. In particular, we request that newsprint be included among the supplies carried into Jaffna. News Help by sharing this information Your Excellency,We are writing to express our serious concern at the acute shortage of newsprint and printing ink in Jaffna and the implications this has on the ability of people in that region of Sri Lanka to access the news. Organisation Sri Lanka: tamil reporter held on absurd terrorism charge 26 January 2007 July 29, 2020 Find out more We respectfully remind you that there are no radio or TV stations in Jaffna and the only way people in the region are able to get news is through newspapers. Newscenter_img Follow the news on Sri Lanka Sri Lanka: Journalist manhandled by notorious police inspector currently on trial Receive email alerts Reportedly there has been no road connection between Colombo and Jaffna since the main A9 road was closed last year due to heavy fighting. The commissioner for essential services has so far refused to load newsprint and ink onto the few ships carrying supplies to Jaffna. January 26, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Open letter to the donor countries’ ambassadors regarding the situation of the media in Jaffna Sri LankaAsia – Pacific RSF_en This has resulted in severe hardships for newspapers in Jaffna. According to our reports, all three newspapers in the city now print only four pages and print runs have also been drastically reduced. For example, Uthayan, Jaffna’s best-selling paper, used to print 12 pages and sell about 20,000 copies, whereas it now prints only 7,500 copies of four pages and will reportedly soon have to reduce further to just two pages. Uthayan may have to close in about one month if it does not receive supplies of newsprint and ink. Sri LankaAsia – Pacific News News July 15, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Head of journalists’ union facing dismissal for criticising his newspaper

first_img RSF_en News MalaysiaAsia – Pacific Reporters Without Borders condemns the way that Hata Wahari, the president of the National Union Of Journalists Malaysia (NUJ), is being treated by his newspaper, the Kuala Lumpur-based daily Utusan Malaysia. The newspaper is owned by the United Malays National Organization (UMNO), a political party that has played a dominant role in Malaysia since independence.An internal enquiry by the newspaper’s top management concluded on 14 April that Wahari was guilty of damaging its image in a series of statements last year in which he accused the newspaper of failing to provide the public with objective news coverage and slanting its reporting in favour of the ruling coalition to which UMNO belongs.“As NUJ president, Wahari has every right to raise issues of journalistic ethics,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Although the newspaper’s management cannot sue this experienced journalist, his comments are liable to result in his dismissal. It shows that the management wants to take reprisals and that its relations with the government are too close. A free and outspoken press is incompatible with political interference in press matters.”The internal enquiry was carried out by a panel consisting of three senior members of the Utusan Malaysia management – the general manager of marketing, the head of internal audit and the finance manager.Reporters Without Borders tried to speak to senior representatives at Utusan Malaysia but they refused to make any comment. Wahari said his punishment would be decided by the executive chairman, the editor in chief and the executive director. He was “expecting the worst,” he said.Wahari added: “In Malaysia I’m protected by the law and they cannot sue me. Under the Industrial Relations Act, I have immunity. The only way they can get me is by means of a domestic or internal inquiry.”Wahari, who has worked for Utusan Malaysia since 1995, was elected NUJ president last September. The internal enquiry began in January and the punishment is due to be announced at the end of April.If he is fired, he will be the third Utusan Malaysia journalist to lose his job because of his union activities, the Asia Sentinel news website said. Former NUJ president Yazid Othman and the former head of the NUJ section at Utusan Malaysia, Amran Ahmad, were also dismissed.Malaysia is ranked 141st out of 178 countries in the 2010 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. News Receive email alerts News News Organisation New Malaysian ordinance threatens very concept of truth to go furthercenter_img March 17, 2021 Find out more Record fine for Malaysian news site over readers’ comments Help by sharing this information February 22, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Malaysia MalaysiaAsia – Pacific April 19, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Head of journalists’ union facing dismissal for criticising his newspaper Malaysian cartoonist Zunar facing possible sedition charge again January 29, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

RSF, CPJ call on Nicaragua to release two journalists held on terrorism charges

first_imgNews Follow the news on Nicaragua June 29, 2020 Find out more Organisation Help by sharing this information September 29, 2020 Find out more RSF and PEN urge Nicaraguan legislators to reject “foreign agents” bill Reporters Without Borders (RSF) and the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) condemned the detention of two independent journalists in Nicaragua, and called on Nicaraguan authorities to immediately release them and drop all charges against them. July 29, 2020 Find out more News NicaraguaAmericas Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedWomenFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment Newscenter_img Nearly half of UN member countries have obstructed coronavirus coverage Receive email alerts February 21, 2019 RSF, CPJ call on Nicaragua to release two journalists held on terrorism charges Source: El Sol del Centro Miguel Mora and Lucía Pineda Ubau, journalists for the independent cable and digital channel 100% Noticias, have been held in pre-trial detention on charges of “inciting violence and hate” and “promoting terrorism” since their arrest during a police raid on their Managua newsroom on December 21, exactly two months ago.“The ongoing detention and baseless charges against Miguel Mora and Lucía Pineda are the clearest sign of the stark deterioration of press freedom conditions within Nicaragua,” said CPJ South and Central America Program Coordinator Natalie Southwick. “Mora and Pineda have now spent two months behind bars, showing just how far the Nicaraguan government is willing to go to silence critical reporting. Nicaraguan authorities should immediately let them return home to their families and stop the transparent attempts to criminalize journalism.”Since their arrest, Mora and Pineda have been held in solitary confinement with no visits from family or lawyers for over a month, and rushed through multiple court appearances with limited access to legal representation, according to reports. Their next court date is set for March 18. Conditions in the prisons where they are being held are notoriously poor, and family members and lawyers have reported that Mora is suffering from health issues as a result of his imprisonment.“Covering opposition political activity cannot, under any circumstances, be regarded as a terrorist activity. Miguel Mora and Lucía Pineda do not belong in prison, nor does any Nicaraguan journalist,” said Emmanuel Colombié, head of RSF’s Latin America desk. “The government of President Daniel Ortega must respect international guarantees for freedom of expression, stop harassing the independent press, and allow these unjustly imprisoned reporters to return to their work without fear of violent reprisal, interference, or arrest.”Nicaragua is ranked 90th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. Gruesome death threats against Nicaraguan exile journalist RSF_en NicaraguaAmericas Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedWomenFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment to go further Newslast_img read more

Iran opens up markets but not prisons

first_img News Dozens of journalists and netizens imprisonedRanked 173rd out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index, Iran is one of the world’s most oppressive nations for journalists and netizens. And with a total of 38 journalists and netizens are currently detained, it is also one of the world’s biggest prisons for news and information providers.Four of the detained journalists were arrested on 2 November – International Day to End Impunity for Crimes against Journalists – just two weeks before President Rouhani’s visit.These four – Afarine Chitsaz of the daily Iran, Ehssan Mandarinier, the editor of the daily Farhikhteghan, Saman Safarzai of the monthly Andisher Poya and Issa Saharkhiz, a well-known independent journalist – were arrested for allegedly being members of “an illegal network linked with the governments of the US and Britain who were active in Iranian media.”On 9 October, the journalist and documentary filmmaker Kaivan Karimi was sentenced to six years in prison and 223 lashes on a charge of insulting Islam for greeting a woman with a kiss and a handshake. He was also convicted for making a documentary about post-revolution graffiti and a video for a singer living abroad.It should not be forgotten that Iran has never ratified the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment.Jason Rezaian’s 16-month-old nightmareOn 17 November, Jason Rezaian, a journalist with US and Iranian dual nationality who is the Washington Post’s Tehran correspondent, will have been held for a total of 483 days on a charge of “spying for a foreign power.”Revolutionary Guards in plain clothes arrested Rezaian at his Tehran home on 22 July 2014 along with his wife, Yeganeh Salehi, a journalist for The National, a newspaper based in the United Arab Emirates, and two other US citizens. Ever since his arrest, Rezaian has been mistreated in a section of Tehran’s Evin prison under Revolutionary Guard control. The main aim was to extract a confession and use it against him at his trial, which was held behind closed doors. Despite many appeals from international NGOs, he is still held.Internet surveillanceAround 100 netizens have been arrested, convicted or jailed – mainly on the basis of intelligence gathered by the Revolutionary Guards – since the moderate conservative Rouhani became president on 14 June 2013.This persecution is just an extension of the unprecedented crackdown that began immediately after President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection in 2009, in which at least 300 journalists and netizens were the victims of arbitrary arrest, torture and long jail sentences. With more than 40 million Internet users, according to official figures, Iran is one of the region’s most connected countries. The creation of a “Halal Internet,” ordered by Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has not been abandoned. It has just changed name. The focus is now on “Intelligent Filtering,” which ensures that access to the Internet and above all to social networks is selective and controlled, and that the Revolutionary Guards can continue persecuting netizens.Media censorship and self-censorshipIran’s dynamic media are under constant pressure and have to censor information that is embarrassing for the regime. If they don’t, they risk intervention by a long list of censors – including judicial officials, the intelligence ministry and the Revolutionary Guards – who harass journalists and media outlets.Whether or not they were sentenced to a post-imprisonment ban on practicing their profession, journalists are unable to work again after being released. Publishers and editors receive clear instructions not to hire them.Compliant judges and illegal courtsUnder article 110 of the constitution, it is Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei who appoints the head of the judicial system. At the same time, journalists are usually prosecuted on the basis of information provided by the Revolutionary Guards, who take their orders directly from Khamenei. What room is there for judicial independence with Khamenei controlling both the Revolutionary Guards and the head of the judicial apparatus?Furthermore, although the constitution does not permit revolutionary courts, more than 60 percent of convicted journalists and netizens were tried before revolutionary courts.Finally, most of these trials are conducted secretly although one of the provisions of article 168 of the constitution stipulates that trials of political offences and media offences should be open to the public. IranMiddle East – North Africa As President Hassan Rouhani prepares to visit Paris on 17 November, Reporters Without Borders points out that imprisoned journalists, mass Internet surveillance and media censorship characterize the very disturbing state of freedom of information in Iran. Receive email alerts Organisation November 15, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Iran opens up markets but not prisons to go further News RSF_en News June 9, 2021 Find out more Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists IranMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 Follow the news on Iran March 18, 2021 Find out more News February 25, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Two more journalists discover their e-mail has been hacked

first_imgNews Follow the news on Argentina ArgentinaAmericas Latin American media: under control of families, economic and political elites News Receive email alerts July 6, 2020 Find out more News Two broadcast journalists yesterday said their personal e-mail accounts were hacked and used to send messages to other people, in a case similar to that reported by the Clarín newspaper earlier this month. Ernesto Tenembaum of Radio Mitre and Luis Majul of América TV suggested the intelligence services could be involved, but the government ruled this out. News Organisation Help by sharing this information ArgentinaAmericas On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia November 19, 2020 Find out more RSF_en Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world to go further Reporters Without Borders voiced shock at yesterday’s claims by two broadcast journalists, Radio Mitre reporter Ernesto Tenembaum and América TV producer Luis Majul, that their personal e-mail accounts were hacked and used to send messages to other people. This follows a similar case, reported on 11 May, involving Daniel Santoro of the Clarín daily newspaper.The press freedom organisation said it hoped a statement by presidential chief of staff Alberto Fernández condemning these practices would be quickly followed up by an investigation at the highest level.Tenembaum said during his Radio Mitre programme yesterday that some of his e-mail messages, containing off-the-record exchanges with officials and judges, had been sent from his own e-mail address without his knowledge to members of the government and other journalists.He said he discovered this from fellow-journalist Marcelo Slotogwiadza, who had himself received by e-mail part of Tenembaum’s exchanges with interior minister Aníbal Fernández, supreme court justice Eugenio Zaffaroni, Quilmes mayor Jorge Villordo, former judge Pablo Lanusse, and Santoro, the first journalist to report that his e-mail had been hacked.Majul, who is the producer of the programme “La Cornisa,” said that on 21 May he discovered that a message containing the e-mail addresses of leading political and business personalities had been sent to some of his contacts from his own e-mail address. He told Reporters Without Borders that this kind of manipulation happens “whenever there is tension between the press and the authorities.”Tenembaum and Majul plan to file complaints claiming violation of their private correspondence with judge Guillermo Montenegro, who is already investigating the Santoro case. Both Tenembaum and Majul have suggested that the intelligence services could be involved, although the president’s chief of staff ruled this out._____________________________________________________________18.05.06 – Newspaper reporter’s exchange of e-mails with judge is stolenReporters Without Borders today condemned a case of electronic theft and spying on reporter Daniel Santoro of the Clarín daily newspaper, which reported on 11 May that his entire exchange of e-mail messages with judge Daniel Rafecas about a drug trafficking case the judge is handling was stolen and copied to the lawyer of one of the defendants.“Santoro is right to consider the theft of his e-mail as a violation of the confidentiality of his sources,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We support Santoro and Clarín in this case and we hope the authorities will quickly establish how and by whom copies of Santoro’s e-mail messages were sent to one of the defendants’ lawyers.”The so-called “Viñas Blancas” case concerns an alleged attempt by two Serbian citizens to smuggle 171 kg of cocaine to Europe. Copies of all the e-mails between Santoro and the judge somehow landed on the desk of Juan Manuel Ubeira, the lawyer acting for one of the two Serbs. The oldest dates back to 1 March, four days before Clarín ran its first report by Santoro on the case, which focused on the lavish marriage of one the defendants in a hotel.“I am very surprised the information stolen from me reached the lawyer of one of the two defendants,” Santoro told Reporters Without Borders. “What worries me even more is that I have been spied on for almost two months.”In Santoro’s view, the e-mail correspondence was stolen with the aim of discrediting the judge and sabotaging the judicial investigation. He said Clarín’s computer system was complex and that significant financial and technological resources must have been used.Prosecutor Carlos Stornelli has asked judge Guillermo Montenegro to establish whether there was a violation of a law on the privacy of correspondence. Until now, the law has applied only to postal correspondence and a legal precedent will be set if it is deemed to cover Santoro’s e-mail.With the support of his newspaper, Santoro has meanwhile filed a complaint alleging a violation of the confidentiality of a journalist’s sources, which was recognised by a constitutional amendment in 1994. May 23, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two more journalists discover their e-mail has been hacked December 4, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

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