What to do in a typhoon

first_imgThe Japan Stay Safe Twitter feed also has live updates  and visitors are also advised to download the JNTO’s Safety Tips app.You can also call for tourist advice: Keep track of latest weather updatesThe Japan Meteorological Agency has the latest updates on the typhoon on its website so you can keep track of its path.NHK World News also has information on the weather, transport services and so on in English, providing you with the most up-to-date news.Travel informationA lot of flights to/from Tokyo on Saturday have already been cancelled – check details for Narita Airport or Haneda Airport to keep track of the latest information.Transport change: Bullet train services are being cancelled on Saturday (Getty Images)Shinkansen (bullet trains) services between Tokyo and Nagoya have been cancelled from Saturday morning, and most of those between Nagoya and Shin-Osaka have also been suspended. If you’re going to Australia v Georgia in Shizuoka on Friday night, you will likely be affected so will need to make alternative accommodation/travel plans.JR trains have also been suspended in Tokyo from 9am on Saturday. Again NHK News is a good source for the latest travel information. Huge: The potential impact of Typhoon Hagibis compared to Faxai, which hit in September (Getty Images) What to do in a typhoonTyphoon Hagibis is set to hit the greater Tokyo area on Saturday evening. This ‘super typhoon’ has already caused the cancellation of two Rugby World Cup matches and is threatening Sunday’s fixtures too.It’s the biggest typhoon of the season with a diameter of 1400km and could be one of Japan’s worst-ever storms. Strong winds and heavy rain are expected to affect wide areas of Japan and, as it’s close to a full moon, sea levels will also be higher than normal, so there is a significant risk of flooding on the coast.Danger: Damage caused by Typhoon Faxai last month (Getty Images)It’s an extremely dangerous weather system, but what do you do to stay safe in a typhoon? We’ve put together some advice for those in Japan for the tournament to help…Stay indoorsA simple but important message. Don’t venture outside during the storm because it is extremely dangerous. Three people died during Typhoon Faxai last month and Hagibis is a lot more powerful.Make sure your windows are closed and if you have anything outside – a pot plant for example – bring it inside. This is unlikely for those staying in hotels but if you’re in an Airbnb or rental apartment it’s worth checking there is nothing outside that could blow over or away.If you’re in a hotel, check with staff on the safest place to stay – in your room or a communal area.This video from The Japan Times contains good advice…Be preparedMake sure you have fully charged your phones, laptops and other devices because the typhoon may cause power cuts.Purchase a torch (rather than run the battery down on your phone by using the flashlight) in case of a power cut.Stock up on non-perishable foods and drinks so you won’t go hungry or thirsty while you can’t go outside.Have a bag packed with key items and some sensible clothing ready should there be a call to evacuate. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS If you’re going to be in the area when Typhoon Hagibis hits Japan make sure you know how to stay safe with these tips Keep track of events in Japan via our Rugby World Cup homepage.Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Leicester and England scrum-half Ben Youngs

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the December 2020 edition 0f Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Chocolate. What bar depends what mood I’m in. If I’m filling the car up at a petrol station and you’re telling me I have to choose one, I’d go Snickers.If you could have one superpower, what would it be? Reading people’s minds. Whose would I read first? Maybe my dog’s. I’ve got a 14-week-old pup and he’s doing nothing we ask as we try to train him, so that would be interesting.So my dog to start with, then everyone else – my wife, kids… I’d soon find out if people liked me or not. I’m not sure I’d want to know what the coaches think!If your house was on fire, what would you save (people and pets are safe)? My wedding photos… can you send this interview to my wife?What would be your Mastermind specialist subject? Movies. I do really enjoy films but I’d struggle to say which one was my favourite. Thrillers and crime films are the type I like.Who would be your three dream dinner party guests? Tom Croft and me. We don’t need anyone else.What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? The only people’s opinions that matter are from those dearest to you. Except Tom Croft.Tom’s getting a fair bit of stick here… Crofty and I lived together for a few years and we’re great friends. He’d be doing the same to me if he could but he’s retired – his body’s given up and he’s old – so he can’t get his own back.Got any surprising hidden talents?I’ve never lost a game of Cluedo. I will challenge anybody.What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? To take my Cluedo skills into the real world and become a detective.How’d you like to be remembered? As somebody my team-mates wanted to play with. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Downtime with… Leicester and England scrum-half Ben YoungsWhat’s the funniest thing you’ve heard on the pitch? I’m not sure I can tell the story but all I will say is that it involved Matt Smith and Stephen Jones! There was quite a bit more talk on the field when I started playing because they didn’t have ref mics back then.Got any nicknames? Lenny. I wish I had a story for it but I’m the youngest of 28 first cousins and we all have the same sort of nickname – Benny became Lenny and it stuck. Everyone calls me that now.Who are the jokers in the Leicester squad? Everyone knows how to have a laugh but the two scheming something all the time are definitely (Ellis) Gengey and Nemani (Nadolo). They’re always in good spirits and fun to be around.With England, there’s been a few. Hask (James Haskell) was always very amusing, and Joe Marler. And there are always simple pranks. On tour in South Africa or Australia, a rubber snake will be put in someone’s bag. It’s simple but highly effective for team morale.Do you have any phobias? None that really keep me up at night. But I’m not sure I would want to have a snake land on me or a shark pop up next to me in the ocean.What really annoys you? Playing golf against George Ford, because he’s annoyingly good!Do you have any superstitions? None! Once you have one, you will never stop adding them…Your most embarrassing moment? When Tom Croft was halfway through his best man speech at my wedding… I am not saying anymore.Who would you like to be stuck in a lift with? Tom Hanks, he seems like such a good bloke. I have so many questions for him. Who was his favourite character to play? Which character fascinated him most? If he could have had the lead role in any other movie, what would it be?If you could be one team-mate, who would it be? Nemani, to see how fun it would be to be that big!What’s the silliest thing you’ve ever bought?Buying into a coffee business with Tom Croft. It’s at the stadium, Welford Road, but with Covid and no crowds it’s fizzled out. At some point Crofty will probably have another ‘eureka moment’.What’s your guilty pleasure? center_img Centurion: Ben Youngs with the Six Nations trophy and his ‘gold cap’ after his 100th Test (Getty Images) The Test centurion talks close mates and fake snakeslast_img read more

Six Nations Wales v England Preview

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Six Nations Wales v England PreviewEngland’s cricketers may have struggled for half-centuries, let alone centuries, in the day-night Test against India, but major milestones will be hit by players on both teams in this Six Nations match at the Principality Stadium on Saturday.George North, 28, is set to make his 100th Test appearance for Wales – the youngest player to reach the milestone for his country – while Elliot Daly is in line to win his 50th cap for England. TAGS: Highlight An intriguing tussle is set to play out at the Principality Stadium this weekend Robson [email protected]_jrobson with the big miss pass to set up @elliotdaly for England’s sixth try pic.twitter.com/MG3HizfdjQ— England Rugby (@EnglandRugby) February 13, 2021It’s one of the less experienced players on the pitch who could get the most attention, though, at least from England’s kickers. They are expected to try to put pressure on 20-year-old Wales wing Louis Rees-Zammit with high balls – maybe a few spirals from George Ford – but he does have expert ‘bomb defuser’ Liam Williams to assist.Plus, if England’s kicking game lacks accuracy and the chase lacks intensity – as it has quite often in recent months – they could simply be presenting a dangerous Wales back three with the opportunity to counter. Although, the prospect of seeing a footrace between Rees-Zammit and Jonny May is certainly one to get excited about. “Jonathan brings a wealth of experience and we look at him as a 12, not as a 13. The last time he played for us was at 12 against Italy and I thought he did a good job in attack and defence on that day.“Foxy (Davies) is looking very good from our point of view and when he pulls that Welsh jersey on, he never lets the team down.”Jonathan Davies and George North are teaming up in midfield (Inpho)England head coach Eddie Jones: “Wales is a really special fixture and rivalry. There is a long history between the two nations and the game means a lot to both countries.“We know we’ll be up against a strong Welsh challenge on Saturday, but we’ve got a very good team to face it. We want to show people what we are capable of, keep building our performances and the best is yet to come from this England team.”What are the odds?Wales may be higher in the table but England are the favourites for this match, with odds of 5-12 on Bet365. A Wales win is 11-5 or you can get odds of 22-1 on a draw.If you fancy putting some money on the fixture, Bet365 have a welcome bonus of up to £100 in Bet Credits.Min deposit £5. Bet Credits available for use upon settlement of bets to value of qualifying deposit. Min odds, bet and payment method exclusions apply. Returns exclude Bet Credits stake. Time limits and T&Cs apply.Over-18s only. BeGambleAware.Any interesting statistics?If Wales win, they will win the Triple Crown for the 22nd time – only England have won it more (26).Wales have won only one of their last seven matches against England in the Six Nations – but games have been tight, with single-figure winning margins in the last six.England have never conceded more than two tries in a Six Nations game in Wales – the only team to do so.Wales have made the fewest handling errors in the 2021 championship so far (22) while England have made the most (35).These two sides top this year’s charts for maul metres made, England with 44 and Wales with 43.center_img Who’s faster, Wales’ Louis Rees-Zammit or England’s Jonny May?It’s going to be some showdown between the flying wingers! pic.twitter.com/DTKpELnmIk— BBC Sport Wales (@BBCSportWales) February 22, 2021Eddie Jones’s selection of six forwards on the bench would suggest he hopes his team can dominate Wales physically in the tight exchanges. Wales’ set-piece has improved since the autumn but there are definitely still chinks England will be looking to expose, particularly at lineout time where the hosts have the worst success rate (81%) of any team in this year’s championship.Many point to the fact Wales’ opponents were reduced to 14 men in their previous two wins and while they were far from convincing in those victories against Ireland and Scotland, they did show dogged determination (as well as the odd spark of magic from Rees-Zammit).That steely mentality tends to keep Wales in the fight. Take last year against England – they looked out of it at 33-16 but came back to narrow the gap to 33-30 at Twickenham (there was a red card in that match too!).Even without the cacophony of noise generated by a capacity Cardiff crowd, intensity levels will rise for this one and it should be tight. It’s Wales v England after all.Related: Eight great England v Wales matchesWhat’s the big team news?Wales have named a different player at scrum-half for the third match running, with Kieran Hardy in the No 9 shirt, while George North and Jonathan Davies will combine in midfield after returning from injury.Josh Adams is back following his suspension for breaching Covid-19 rules and Liam Williams shifts from wing to full-back.Up front, Wayne Pivac has made one change with fit-again Josh Navidi starting at blindside instead of Aaron Wainwright.Despite his side being widely criticised for their performances in the opening two rounds, Eddie Jones has made just two changes to the England team that beat Italy.Jamie George will start at hooker for England (Getty Images)Jamie George regains his starting spot at hooker with Luke Cowan-Dickie dropping to the bench and Mark Wilson is back at blindside after Courtney Lawes picked up an injury in training, but the back-line remains the same.Jones has again gone for a six-two split between forwards and backs on the bench, with Leicester back-row George Martin in line to win his first cap.What have the coaches said?Wales head coach Wayne Pivac on the centre pairing: “George brings a lot of excitement to the position. He’s got that outside break, he’s big and strong, he can do the donkey work in the middle of the park if he needs to. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It doesn’t get much better than this! Here’s some of the best England tries against Wales in the #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/ckv487KaqD— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 24, 2021What time does it kick off and is it on TV?Wales v England, Saturday 27 February, Principality StadiumThe match kicks off at 4.45pm and will be broadcast live on BBC1 and S4C, plus BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC Radio Wales & Radio Cymru and the BBC sport website.France’s Pascal Gauzere has the whistle for this match in Cardiff and he will be assisted by Irishmen Andrew Brace and Frank Murphy. Alex Ruiz, of France, is the Television Match Official.Related: How to watch the Six Nations wherever you areWhat are the line-ups?Wales: Liam Williams; Louis Rees-Zammit, George North, Jonathan Davies, Josh Adams; Dan Biggar, Kieran Hardy; Wyn Jones, Ken Owens, Tomos Francis, Adam Beard, Alun Wyn Jones, Josh Navidi, Justin Tupuric, Taulupe Faletau.Replacements: Elliot Dee, Rhodri Jones, Leon Brown, Cory Hill, James Botham, Gareth Davies, Callum Sheedy, Uilisi Halaholo.England: Elliot Daly; Anthony Watson, Henry Slade, Owen Farrell, Jonny May; George Ford, Ben Youngs; Mako Vunipola, Jamie George, Kyle Sinckler, Maro Itoje, Jonny Hill, Mark Wilson, Tom Curry, Billy Vunipola.Replacements: Luke Cowan-Dickie, Ellis Genge, Will Stuart, Charlie Ewels, George Martin, Ben Earl, Dan Robson, Max Malins. Alun Wyn Jones competes with Maro Itoje at a lineout – a key battleground (Getty Images) last_img read more

El Consejo Ejecutivo sopesa el proceso del próximo presupuesto trienal

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 27, 2013 El Consejo Ejecutivo sopesa el proceso del próximo presupuesto trienal Los miembros empiezan a soñar y a concebir el futuro de la Iglesia, y a orar por él Submit a Press Release Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Program Budget & Finance Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Executive Council, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Executive Council February 2013, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal comenzó aquí su reunión de tres días con el examen de un proceso para formular una propuesta presupuestaria para el trienio 2016-2018.El Rdo. Canónigo Charles LaFond, miembro del Consejo procedente de [la diócesis de] Nuevo Hampshire, dirigió a sus colegas en un ejercicio de 75 minutos de duración que incluía meditación silenciosa, oración y conversaciones de mesa de 12 minutos. Los miembros del Consejo cambiaron de mesa para cada una de estas sesiones de conversación como un modo de estimular una amplia discusión al tiempo que se les pedía que tuvieran en cuenta dos preguntas: “¿Hacía dónde Dios parece conducir a nuestra Iglesia y cuáles son nuestras esperanzas y sueños para el futuro [y] qué acciones y ministerios nos ayudarían a realizar esas esperanzas y esos sueños?”  y “¿Cuál es el papel idóneo de la estructura denominacional (a diferencia de las estructuras diocesanas o locales) para potenciar estos ministerios y estas acciones?”.El ejercicio surge de un subcomité creado durante la última reunión del Consejo por su Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Finanzas para la Misión (FFM, sigla en inglés) para revisar el proceso trienal que los miembros han utilizado para formular una propuesta presupuestaria trienal.Los miembros del Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas (PB&F), que recibe la propuesta presupuestaria del Consejo Ejecutivo, y la Comisión Permanente sobre la Estructura de la Iglesia se encuentran entre los integrantes del subcomité, dijo la Rda. Susan Snook, miembro del Consejo proveniente de la [diócesis de] Arizona que preside el subcomité.Los miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo 2009-2012 no estaban enteramente complacidos con el proceso presupuestario durante ese trienio. En el curso de su última reunión antes de la Convención General de 2012, enviaron un memorando de preocupaciones específicas al PB&F  acerca de su documento presupuestario 2012-2015. En parte, decían que una decisión de programar la primera reunión del PB&F sobre el presupuesto al día siguiente de concluir la reunión del consejo les exigía convenir en “un documento final antes de que la oficina del tesorero tuviera el tiempo necesario para redactar el documento a fin de someterlo a una revisión final del Consejo Ejecutivo”.Mark Hollingsworth, obispo de la Diócesis de Ohio y presidente del FFM, le dijo al Consejo en octubre que su comité había acordado que el proceso debe cambiarse, aunque un proceso especial sobre la estructura de la Iglesia abordaría sin duda los asuntos presupuestarios. Ese equipo de trabajo se reunió por primera vez a principios de este mes y debe reportarle a la Iglesia en noviembre de 2014 y traer sus recomendaciones a la reunión de la Convención General en Salt Lake City en 2015.Sin embargo, el proceso del Consejo Ejecutivo de formular una propuesta presupuestaria 2016-2019, tiene lugar al mismo tiempo que la tarea de ese grupo por la regla conjunta II.10c.ii de la Convención General estipula que el Consejo debe presentar su propuesta presupuestaria al PB&F no menos de cuatro meses antes del comienzo de la Convención General.Concibiendo el futuroSnook invitó a los miembros del Consejo el 25 de febrero a comenzar a contemplar la manera de cambiar el proceso, en primer lugar “a soñar y a concebir el futuro de la Iglesia y a orar por él —por nuestra visión para la Iglesia”.El papel del Consejo en el proceso presupuestario de la Convención General conlleva proponer una visión y una misión para cada trienio, dijo.“El primer paso es llegar a entender lo que nosotros, como Consejo Ejecutivo, creemos que es la visión y misión de la Iglesia” en el trienio 2016-2019, agregó. El ejercicio tenía el propósito no sólo de ver “lo que creemos que de be hacerse, sino discernir lo que Dios necesita que se haga”.Snook vinculó ese ejercicio al real procesamiento de cifras en la formulación del presupuesto, al decir: “no importa lo que digas que es tu visión, lo que pones en el papel como la manera en que te propones gastar el dinero expresa lo que es realmente tu visión”.“No llegaremos hoy a ninguna conclusión concreta respecto a lo que es la visión y misión de la Iglesia”, agregó. “éste es el comienzo de un proceso de años para hacer que nazca una visión”.LaFond llamó al ejercicio “un manera cuaresmal” de abordar esas cuestiones con indagación abierta y cuestionamiento humilde”, valiéndose del silencio tanto como de la reflexión conversacional. El silencio, afirmó, es “sentarse ahí a recibir [instrucciones] del Espíritu Santo”. El silencio, añadió, es con frecuencia el espacio utilizado para formular una respuesta brillante a una pregunta.“Algunos de ustedes encontrarán este ejercicio muy ameno y meditativo; otros lo aborrecerán y se opondrán a él, deseando más bien producir algo tangible o hacer una declaración o publicar un resultado”, afirmó LaFond.El subcomité del FFM ha propuesto un proceso presupuestario trienal que se discutirá más tarde en esta reunión, continuó Snook, quien sugirió que el ejercicio del 25 de febrero resultaría útil independientemente de la configuración del proceso que el Consejo finalmente elija.Después del ejercicio, los miembros del Consejo, el personal y los visitantes participaron en la celebración de la EucaristíaLa reunión del 25 al 27 de febrero está teniendo lugar en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo.También en la agenda del Consejo:El consejo dedicó la tarde del 25 de febrero a reuniones por comités y también comenzará con reuniones de comités el 26. Está programada una reunión plenaria para la media tarde del 26 de febrero, durante la cual los miembros se espera que oigan un informe sobre la 15ª. reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, una actualización sobre la recuperación de la Diócesis de Haití luego del terremoto y una presentación sobre la utilización futura del Centro Denominacional  de la Iglesia Episcopal en el 815 de la Segunda Avenida en Nueva York. La Convención General aprobó la Resolución D016 durante su reunión de julio pasado, en la que decía que “es la voluntad de esta Convención mudar las oficinas centrales de la Iglesia” de ese edificio. El 27 de febrero, el Consejo se reunirá en sesión plenaria para oír informes de comités y considerar resoluciones.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General según el Canon I.4 (1)(a). El consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros —20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son electos por la Convención General y 18 (un clérigo y un laico) por cada una de los nueve sínodos provinciales, por períodos de seis años— además del/de la Obispo/a Primado/a y el/la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service.Traducción de Vicente Echerrilast_img read more

Massachusetts diocese ordains Alan M. Gates as bishop

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 By ENS staffPosted Sep 17, 2014 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Massachusetts diocese ordains Alan M. Gates as bishop Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Rt. Rev. Alan Gates. Photo: Matthew Cavanaugh/Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts ordained and consecrated the Rev. Alan M. Gates as its 16th bishop on Sept. 13 during a service at the Agganis Arena at Boston University.Bishop Stephen T. Lane of the Diocese of Maine, president of Province I of the Episcopal Church, served as the chief consecrator. He was among some 4,000 participants and 27 bishops who attended the service. A massed choir of 550-plus singers from nearly 75 parish choirs performed, along with a gospel choir, a brass ensemble, a steel drum band and a handbell choir.Bishop Mark Hollingsworth Jr. of the Diocese of Ohio, and formerly a priest of the Diocese of Massachusetts, preached.A photo gallery of the service is available here.Gates, 56, former rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Cleveland, Ohio, was elected bishop of the Diocese of Massachusetts on April 5.Gates is a Massachusetts native and graduate of Middlebury College. Prior to seminary he was a Russian language translator, researcher and intelligence analyst for the U.S. Department of Defense, including a tour of duty at the State Department. He holds a Master of Divinity degree from Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and was ordained to the priesthood in 1988. He served congregations in the Episcopal dioceses of Massachusetts, Western Massachusetts and Chicago prior to his call to Ohio. He and his spouse, Patricia J. Harvey, have two adult sons.Gates succeeds the Rt. Rev. M. Thomas Shaw, SSJE, who has served the Diocese of Massachusetts as its bishop since 1995 and who resigned his office at the time of the consecration on Sept. 13.The Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, established in 1784, is among the Episcopal Church’s oldest and largest in terms of baptized membership, and comprises 180 parishes, missions, chapels and campus chaplaincies in eastern Massachusetts. Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Consecrations, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA People Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC House of Bishops, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

South Carolina: Second priest returns through path for reconciliation

first_img South Carolina This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Comments (5) Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Richard McClellan says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York William A. Flint, PhD says: March 31, 2015 at 1:01 pm Honestly, the Church shouldn’t be in the marriage business at all. It is and has always been a function of the State. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Julian Malakar says: Comments are closed. March 30, 2015 at 8:09 am “Later, explaining why he wanted to return, Wallace wrote that he grieved his loss of connection with The Episcopal Church, the Anglican Communion and the sacred order of priests, and repented of the decisions that led to his removal”.1. Wallace may have grieved hos loss of connection with TEc but while he remained a member of the clergy of the Episcopal Diocese of SC under Bishop Lawrence he was still connected to the Anglican Communion and the sacred order of priests 2, By saying he repented of his decision implies that he committed a sin. What sin did WAllace commit. He remained in the diocese and under the bishop who ordained him. If there is a sin involved, I missed it. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events By Diocesan StaffPosted Mar 27, 2015 Doug Desper says: [Episcopal Church in South Carolina press release] Episcopal Church in South Carolina Bishop Charles G. vonRosenberg has welcomed another returning priest back into good standing in The Episcopal Church through a new process that provides a path for reconciliation for clergy who left following the 2012 split in eastern South Carolina.In a brief liturgy led by vonRosenberg in Charleston on March 24, the Rev. H. Jeff Wallace reaffirmed the vows he took at his ordination in 2007 and signed a formal declaration promising to conform to the doctrine, discipline and worship of The Episcopal Church.He is the second priest to return to The Episcopal Church after the 2012 split. In September 2014, the Rev. H. Dagnall Free, Jr., was reinstated through the same process. Wallace now joins Free and the other clergy of The Episcopal Church as a priest in good standing.Wallace was an associate rector at Christ the King-Waccamaw, Pawley’s Island, when Bishop Mark Lawrence and other officials of the diocese announced they were leaving The Episcopal Church. Wallace said that he loved the parish and his job there; because of those bonds, he stayed at Christ the King-Waccamaw when it voted to follow Lawrence.But their situation changed suddenly in 2014 when Wallace’s church merged with another breakaway church, leaving him without a parish to serve. He and his wife moved to Texas, where he is serving as pastor at a Lutheran church.In the months after the split, Wallace was still a priest who remained under vonRosenberg’s authority within The Episcopal Church. Over a five-month period in 2013, the bishop made efforts to contact each breakaway clergy member. As happened in most cases, Wallace did not reply. As required by church canons, in August 2013, with the advice and consent of the Standing Committee, vonRosenberg removed more than 100 priests and deacons from the ordained ministry of The Episcopal Church.The canons gave the bishop a choice about which disciplinary procedure to follow. One option was to “depose” clergy who did not recognize the church’s authority. VonRosenberg chose instead to “release and remove” the clergy, which left open the hope for reconciliation and eventual reinstatement. That hope was first realized in September 2014, with Free’s reinstatement.Two months after hearing the news about Free, Wallace wrote to vonRosenberg asking about the path to reinstatement. VonRosenberg replied the same day, laying out the steps that would be necessary and putting Wallace in touch with the people who would help guide him through the process.Later, explaining why he wanted to return, Wallace wrote that he grieved his loss of connection with The Episcopal Church, the Anglican Communion and the sacred order of priests, and repented of the decisions that led to his removal. “We are not sure where God will land us, but we are sure of the longing we have in our heart to be back in an Episcopal parish,” he wrote.Canonically, the only requirement for reinstating a priest is the bishop’s approval. But vonRosenberg has stressed the importance of having a process in place that ensures it will be the right move not only for the priest, but for the entire church.In consultation with the Standing Committee, Chancellor Tom Tisdale, and Commission on Ministry member Amy Webb, the bishop set forth a reinstatement procedure that required:Consulting with the bishop on a regular, ongoing basis;Working with a development coach for evaluations and discussions about the person’s spiritual journey;Cooperating with the administrative staff in rebuilding a professional file, including background checks, training certificates, references and other documentation. Many of these documents are still controlled by the breakaway group, which has refused to release them to clergy who chose to remain in The Episcopal Church;Meeting with the Standing Committee to discuss the desire for reinstatementWallace met March 24 with the Standing Committee, which voted its approval immediately.VonRosenberg said the process has proven to be a good one, and probably will be used again. Discussions are in progress with other clergy who have approached the bishop after learning about the reconciliation process.The bishop and Tisdale also have been named to serve on the Constitution and Canons Committee of the 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church this summer in Salt Lake City, where church officials are expected to consider reinstatement procedures for the entire church. March 30, 2015 at 2:40 pm Separation is always painful no matter who is right or wrong. It is not as easy as many think to adopt new environments as well as to give up thousands of years traditional value of Church’s teaching on virtue and vice. Only God can judge who is right or wrong on receiving God’s grace for forgiveness of sins. But Church should allow all believers to grow spiritually keeping core value of traditional biblical teaching by which Episcopal/Anglican was established. We are sheep and Christ is our Shepard we recognize Christ’s voice thru teaching of Gospel not by contemporary human voice of today. Contemporary voice dies with time but voice of Christ is evergreen. Christ is the head of the Church. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA April 5, 2015 at 11:10 am Thank you! Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET South Carolina: Second priest returns through path for reconciliation Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 March 27, 2015 at 3:15 pm One wonders what crisis of conscience among clergy will occur this Summer. The General Convention has married the age and will insist on making Christian Marriage what it has never been in 2,000 years in direct defiance of Jesus in Matthew 19, as well as the Anglican Communion councils on unity and marriage.How many priests and informed laity will feel trapped by the Church they have loved and come to understand? How many priests will be labeled as seditious if they stand up for the sacrament of Christian Marriage as spoken by Christ Himself in Matthew 19/Genesis 2?How many will accommodate just to get along for daily bread and a pension?The crisis of conscience at this coming General Convention is not over petty topics of Elizabethan versus modern language in a new Prayer Book (1979). It’s about what authority runs this Church: the authority of a Church’s loyalty test that becomes a law unto itself, or a Church that expects its clergy and laity to believe that the Holy Scriptures contain all things necessary for salvation. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls David Wilson says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Queen Elizabeth speaks on Christian unity and Primates Meeting

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis “At the beginning of this new Synod, as you put your hand into the hand of God, my prayer is that, as we sang in that joyous hymn this morning, ‘His glorious light may shine ever on our sight, and clothe us round, the while our path illuming.’”The Church of England’s General Synod is elected for a period of five years and meets two or three times a year. Archbishop of York John Sentamu said that this differed from other churches’ assemblies where the members are elected for each meeting and sometimes meet only once per year; or, in some cases, once every three years.“There is time for us to grow together as a body of Christians, sharing fellowship and worship with each other and bearing each other’s burdens as we engage in the common task and, most importantly, sharing the joy of the Gospel of Christ.”The Synod was gathering “at a moment of great uncertainty and conflict in our world,” Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said. “We shall, in the midst of all our other business, want to take time to pray earnestly for the leaders of the nations as they grapple with problems so intractable that solutions are likely to be neither simple nor quick.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby greets Queen Elizabeth at the Eucharist for the inauguration of the 10th term of General Synod in the Church of England. Photo: Picture Partnership/Westminster Abbey“As we seek to take counsel together here to discern the mind of Christ for the Church of England, and for those whom we serve in this land, we shall draw strength from knowing that Your Majesty’s prayers will be with us,” he said as he addressed the Queen.”Earlier, the Archbishop of Canterbury presided over a pre-Synod Eucharist at Westminster Abbey attended by the Queen and civil and religious dignitaries. The sermon was given by Father Raniero Cantalamessa, the Preacher to the Papal Household.He raised the forthcoming 500th anniversary of the Reformation – the great divide between the Western churches. “It is vital for the whole Church that this opportunity is not wasted by people remaining prisoners of the past, trying to establish each other’s rights and wrongs,” he said. “Rather, let us take a qualitative leap forward, like what happens when the sluice gates of a river or a canal enable ships to continue to navigate at a higher water level.“The situation has dramatically changed since [Reformation times]. We need to start again with the person of Jesus, humbly helping our contemporaries to experience a personal encounter with Him. ‘All things were created through him and for him’; Christ is the light of the world, the one who gives meaning and hope to every human life – and the majority of people around us live and die as if He had never existed! How can we be unconcerned, and each remain ‘in the comfort of our own well panelled houses’?“We should never allow a moral issue like that of sexuality divide us more than faith in Jesus unites us.“We need to go back to the time of the Apostles: they faced a pre-Christian world, and we are facing a largely post-Christian world. When Paul wants to summarise the essence of the Christian message in one sentence, he does not say, ‘I proclaim this or that doctrine to you.’ He says, ‘We preach Christ crucified’ (1 Cor 1:23), and again ‘We preach . . . Jesus Christ as Lord’ (2 Cor 4:5).”He continued: “This does not mean ignoring the great theological and spiritual enrichment that came from the Reformation or desiring to go back to the time before it. It means instead allowing all of Christianity to benefit from its achievements, once they are freed from certain distortions due to the heated atmosphere of the time and of later controversies.“Justification by faith, for example, ought to be preached by the whole Church – and with more vigour than ever. Not in opposition to good works – the issue is already settled – but rather in opposition to the claim of people today that they can save themselves thanks to their science, technology or their man-made spirituality, without the need for a redeemer coming from outside humanity. Self-justification!“I am convinced that if they were alive today this is the way Martin Luther and Thomas Cranmer would preach justification through faith!”Addressing the issue of Christian unity, Father Cantalamessa said that it was “not a simple matter.”“One has to start with the big Churches, those that are well structured, putting together that which unites them, which is vastly more important than what divides them,” he said. “Nothing is more important than to fulfil Christ’s heart desire for unity expressed in today’s gospel.“In many parts of the world people are killed and churches burned not because they are Catholic, or Anglican, or Pentecostals, but because they are Christians. In their eyes we are already one! Let us be one also in our eyes and in the eyes of God.“The Anglican Church has a special role in all of this. It has often defined itself as a ‘via media’ (a Middle Way) between Roman Catholicism and Reformed Christianity. From being a ‘via media’ in a static sense, it must now become more and more a via media in a dynamic sense, exercising an active function as a bridge between the Churches.“The presence among you of a priest of the Catholic Church, in circumstances of such special significance, is a sign that something of the kind is already happening.”Over the next two days, members of the Synod will debate the C of E’s program of reform and renewal, the refugee crisis, and the future of its church buildings. Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Anglican Communion News Service] Queen Elizabeth II has opened the 10th five-year-term of the Church of England’s General Synod with an address which spoke of major advances in Christian unity and the need for prayer for January’s Primates Meeting.Earlier, during a sermon at a Eucharist in Westminster Abbey attended by the Queen and other members of the General Synod, the Preacher to the Papal Household, Father Raniero Cantalamessa, said that disagreements over moral issues should not divide churches.Preacher to the Papal Household, Father Raniero Cantalamessa, preaches in Westminster Abbey during the opening Eucharist for the Church of England’s newest General Synod term. Photo: Picture Partnership/Westminster Abbey“The presence among us today of the Preacher to the Papal Household would not have been possible but for the notable advances since 1970 in co-operation across the great Christian traditions,” the Queen said in her speech to the Synod. “There are many other examples. The covenant between the Church of England and the Methodist Church; the recent visit of the Ecumenical Patriarch; the participation in this Synod of observers from so many Christian traditions; the newly created ecumenical community of St. Anselm at Lambeth. Each of these serves as a reminder both of the progress already made and of the journey that still lies ahead in the pursuit of Christian unity,” she said.The Queen recognized the divisive nature of the some of the Synod’s business, saying that the “last Synod will be particularly remembered for the way in which, after prolonged reflection and conversation, even in the midst of deep disagreements, it was able to approve the legislation to enable women to be consecrated as bishops.“This new Synod too will have to grapple with the difficult issues confronting our Church and our world. On some of these there will be many different views. And I am sure that members of the Synod will pray earnestly that the gathering in January of the Primates of the Anglican Communion will be a time when, together, they may know what is God’s will.”Quoting St. Paul, the Queen said that all Christians “as ambassadors for Christ, are entrusted with the ministry of reconciliation. Spreading God’s word and the onerous but rewarding task of peace-making and conflict resolution are important parts of that ministry.“So too is the Church of England’s particular vocation to work in partnership with those of other faiths and none, to serve the common good in this land. . .“Your Graces, each new Synod inherits from its predecessor the same weighty responsibilities. Collectively, you must continue to draw deeply on your faith, judgement, and life experiences, as well as that precious Anglican tradition of unity in fellowship, to discern the future path of the Church of England. Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books November 27, 2015 at 9:30 pm Thank you for your prayer your Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth. Celebrating Thanksgiving we all become like Saints that day. It is the date we thank God for our lives and His Blessings upon them and our Nation. seeing our Lord in each person. A Saint is where the Lord is on earth. I remember one year living homeless in Washington D.C. in a park across from the White House. It was in winter and I was famished. I walked by a Church whose sign read “Feast Day of a Saint”. Immediately I entered and waited. The minister prayed, read from the Gospel , spoke his homliy . Suddenly the priest lifted the chalice and communion wafer toward Heaven and began to sing; a song celebrating not only that my sins are forgiven; but that Jesus seeks to dwell, live within me. He wants to give us a life in a world without end of love even onto Heaven. I felt a fullness in my heart, soul , and body . There was no food served that day. . I went back to my spot and I made sure I took communion every day, That became thanksgiving for me. but when the real holiday came I still ate like a ravenous American. Thanks for letting me share. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Primates Meeting 2016 Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET November 25, 2015 at 9:13 pm The oneness in Christ that most true Christians desire was eloquently expressed by both the Queen and the Archbishop. But if actions indeed speak louder than words, it will take a show of unity such as not seen heretofore in England or in the US. It will take a constant display of the fellowship we yearn for…done daily and in sincerity. I suggest a modification of each others Lectionaries to start. Perhaps a prayer for those included on each others calendar of saints may send a message, however superficial, that we are taking steps towards a true oneness in Christ. Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Queen Elizabeth speaks on Christian unity and Primates Meeting Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Stewart David Wigdor says: center_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Gavin DrakePosted Nov 24, 2015 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Rev. Dr. C. David Williams says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Primates Meeting, December 14, 2015 at 4:52 am What does it matter, the Lambeth conference and the Anglican communion is a joke because they no longer share a common doctrine or practice of tradition that links them to the CHurch of the Apostles. The practice and belief of these people varies as much between countries as it does within the countries where it exists. It is racked with modernism and liberal philosophy, and now its churches are empty and its voice totally ignored. Anglicanism has discarded everything and every tradition that may have once linked it to the ancient Church and as Cardinal Pell rightly observed, it’s a warning of what will happen to Catholicism if it too starts down the disastrous liberal modernist road proposed by the disasterous Argentine Bergoglio. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Paul Gerard says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (3) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Marking the 40th anniversary of General Convention’s approval of women’s…

first_imgMarking the 40th anniversary of General Convention’s approval of women’s ordination Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel General Convention, Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags At the 1976 General Convention in Minneapolis, diocesan representatives came forward during the United Thank Offering Eucharist to present their offering for the year. It was the largest sum in history: $1,628,001.12. The Triennial Meeting of the Women of the Church made a total of 75 grants for overseas and U.S. projects. Photo: N. B. White/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Forty years ago on Sept. 16, 1976, the General Convention officially opened the Episcopal Church’s ranks of priests and bishops to women.When the House of Bishops was reminded of the anniversary at the opening of its Sept. 16 session in Detroit, Michigan, the bishops responded with a sustained standing ovation.An interactive timeline of the history of women’s ordination in the Anglican Communion is here.Meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the convention added a new section to the church’s ordination canons that read: “The provisions of these canons for the admission of Candidates, and for the Ordination to the three Orders: Bishops, Priests and Deacons shall be equally applicable to men and women.” (Women were eligible to become deaconesses since 1889 and deacons since 1970.)Then on Sept. 21, while the church was still meeting in General Convention, the House of Bishops said that the 15  women who had been “irregularly” ordained in the two years before the 1976 action did not have to be re-ordained. Eleven women were ordained at Church of the Advocate Philadelphia on June 14, 1974, and four women were ordained Sept. 7, 1975, at St. Stephen and the Incarnation Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C.The Rev. Jacqueline Means, the first woman to become a priest in the Episcopal Church under the provisions of a new canon adopted by the General Convention in 1976.  Here she is congratulated by Bishop Donald J. Davis of Erie after the ceremony on Jan. 1, 1977, at All Saints Episcopal Church in Indianapolis, Indiana. Photo: Wide World Photos/via Episcopal ArchivesOn the last day of the 1976 convention, ENS reported that the bishops and deputies had dealt with “the most controversial and potentially explosive issues to come before the supreme legislative body of the church since the very first such meeting in 1785.” The issues included not only women’s ordination but also a complete and historic revision of the 1928 Book Of Common Prayer into the version still being used today.The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, told the opening session of the House of Bishops’ Sept. 15-20 meeting in Detroit, Michigan, that she remembers “sitting in the bleachers in the House of Deputies, holding my breath and waiting for President John Coburn to announce the results of the vote by orders” on the resolution. Bishops had approved the canonical change the day before.“I was in my final year of seminary when that historic vote took place, and the way it has changed the church is really quite incredible in the last four decades, and it also has shaped me and my ministry,” she told the bishops, who gave her a standing ovation when Presiding Bishop Michael Curry introduced her.Jennings said she thought it was fitting that on the afternoon of the 40th anniversary the bishops will hear from former Sen. John Danforth (D-Missouri), an Episcopal priest, about ministry in the public square. Jennings will be part of a subsequent panel discussion on the subject along with Danforth; Bishop of Washington Mariann Budde; and the Rev. Kim Jackson, chaplain at the Absalom Jones Episcopal Center in Atlanta, Georgia. Curry will moderate the panel.“I believe that the Episcopal Church’s commitment to gender equality is essential to our ministry in the public square, and I think those of us who are committed to that goal need to be sure we are focused clearly on the church as it is today, not the church as it was on Sept. 16, 1976,” she said.As the first ordained woman to be elected president of the House of Deputies Jennings said she has a sense of the institutional barriers in the way of ordained women, but she cautioned that “when women are elected or chosen, the work has only just begun.”When the Episcopal Church “truly answer[s] the call to gender equality, we will strive on behalf of all women in our churches and communities,” she said.An essay by Jennings marking the anniversary is due to be posted on the House of Deputies website today. A series of essays by other writers will follow over the next few weeks.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Comments (1) Women’s Ministry An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 16, 2016 Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing The Rev. Patricia Handloss says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem September 17, 2016 at 7:09 pm In my humble opinion this is the most extraordinary event in modern church history. Life changing for the western church. How honored was I to share in the richness of the vote after years of being separated out due to my gender. Thank you to my friends and colleagues who made this happen and continue to make acceptance of women priests happen. The door is open and God holds our hands and hearts as we journey down a road that has at times been rough indeed. Grace will see us through. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Saint Augustine’s president, with deep ties to university’s past, looks…

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls March 22, 2017 at 5:28 pm Shame on Dr. Ward for not being willing to challenge DeVos’ statement! Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Theological Education Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Everett Ward became the 11th president of Saint Augustine’s University in Raleigh, North Carolina, in April 2015. Photo: Saint Augustine’s University[Episcopal News Service] Generations of Everett Ward’s family preceded him in graduating from Saint Augustine’s University, a historically black college in Raleigh, North Carolina, so he was no stranger to the campus in 2014 when he took over as interim president.He was named to that role permanently in April 2015, becoming the school’s 11th president.Q&A: Everett WardAge: 58Home: Raleigh, North CarolinaEducation: Bachelor’s degree, Saint Augustine’s; master’s degree, North Carolina State University; doctorate, North Carolina A&T State UniversityJob: President of Saint Augustine’s UniversityFamily: He married his college sweetheart after graduating from Saint Augustine’s in 1982. Cassandra Lloyd Ward, a longtime educator and civic leader, died in 2011 of breast cancer. “When I walk this campus every day, her spirit walks with me, because we held hands and walked this campus together for four years,” Ward said.Before that, his professional experience included serving as executive director of the North Carolina Democratic Party and as the director of a state Department of Transportation program focused on transportation curriculum, research and student development at historically black colleges and universities.Saint Augustine’s was created in 1867 by the Episcopal Church and opened its doors the following January; one of many schools that formed in the wake of the Civil War to educate black students barred by segregation from attending white institutions.About 100 such schools are still open today, accepting students of all races and interests. Dozens of presidents of historically black colleges and universities, including Ward, traveled to Washington, D.C., at the end of February to meet with elected officials and make their case for increased federal funding to support the schools’ mission. During their visit, President Donald Trump signed an executive order moving an executive branch initiative on historically black colleges from the Department of Education into the White House, signaling the removal of a bureaucratic barrier.Your ties to Saint Augustine’s university go far back, even back to your birth.That is correct. My father attended Saint Augustine’s and all my relatives for several generations. And I was born here on the campus at St. Agnes Hospital, which was operated by the university as the only African-American teaching hospital between here and Atlanta, Georgia. On Nov. 6, 1958, I was honored to be born in a building that a great uncle of mine helped construct when he was a student here.Were you raised as an Episcopalian?No, I was raised as a Presbyterian and I am still a Presbyterian, but was educated both in Catholic schools and public schools, as well as the Episcopal school here at St. Augustine’s. So, church-affiliated education was not new to me or my sister.Was your family particularly religious growing up?My family’s faith was very strong, and faith was a central part of our upbringing as a family. My parents were very active at Davie Street Presbyterian Church, which is our home church and has been the church of our ancestors for several generations.Has Saint Augustine’s connection with the Episcopal Church set it apart in any ways from other historically black colleges or other American colleges in general?For many years, even from our founding, Saint Augustine’s was focused primarily on male students going into the priesthood. Therefore Saint Augustine’s had earned a reputation as the preeminent institution that produced African-American male graduates who would leave Saint Augustine’s and move on to seminary and become Episcopal priests. And women students were dedicated to becoming educators and teachers. So, we have long had a strong reputation of producing men and women who, at that period of time, were focused in education and service to the church. But that has evolved over the year as more opportunities have become available to young people, so now we have graduates in a host of professions throughout the world.In Saint Augustine’s mission statement, it says the school prepares students “academically, socially and spiritually.” Do you see those three goals as equal priorities, and how does Saint Augustine provide spiritual preparation?We have a strong religious studies program and we continue to have spirituality as a focus in our activities on the campus. Our freshmen, for example, attend chapel. We open all our events with prayer and close with prayer. Our university chaplain, who’s also chair of our religious studies program, is very active with student life on the campus. We as an institution take great pride in our affiliation with the church and the importance of spirituality for our students as well.Pew Research Center reported last month less than 9 percent of black students attended a historically black college in 2015, down from 17 percent in 1980.  Over the same period, historically black colleges and universities have become more racially diverse, enrolling more students who aren’t black, from 13 to 17 percent. Do you see that the role of institutions like your own and other historically black colleges has changed for this generation?We certainly have a much more diverse society in America now. We have students of Latino descent, Asian descent – we have a very diverse student body. But I do think that the relevancy of any intellectual community has got to be that you grow and advance with the changing society, because we’re producing the leaders of society here at St. Augustine’s and subsequently you have to embrace diversity.You were part of a group of presidents of historically black colleges and universities to visit the White House recently and even meet with President Trump.At his request, we were invited for a brief meeting over in the Oval Office, but the primary meeting took place under the leadership of U.S. Senator Tim Scott (South Carolina) and North Carolina Congressman Mark Walker.What are your thoughts on those meetings and experience?I thought clearly that there was strong articulation with regard to support of historically black colleges and universities and the enormous contributions that our institutions contribute to American society. It was, in all of those settings, a central theme. There was an appreciation from this administration that historically black colleges would be a part of the continuous growth of American society and beyond. I think now, with the signing of the executive order by the president, we now have to wait and see how those priorities that were articulated with regard to historically black colleges are represented in the budget that will be presented, and passed by both the House and the Senate.(Editor’s note: After this interview was conducted, President Trump on March 16 released a budget proposal that, Inside Higher Ed reports, maintains funding for historically black colleges and universities but reduces spending on programs that support many students of those schools, such as work-study programs and a grant program for low-income students.)There also was some backlash to the meeting. Students at Howard University protested their president’s participation, and Morehouse College President John Wilson Jr. put out a statement calling the meetings “troubling.” Do you share some of the concerns?Well, I think anytime you can assemble together and have dialog about the future of the institutions that you manage on a day-to-day basis, it’s always productive. I think at this point, as I said earlier, we’re waiting to see what the budgetary priorities will reflect. So, we’re looking forward to that.There also was criticism of comments Education Secretary Betty DeVos made that historically black colleges were “real pioneers when it comes to school choice,” rather than formed out of necessity because of segregation. Did you have any reaction to those comments?No. I think sometimes not understanding history and not understanding the context for which these universities were founded, people can make sometimes misleading statements. So, I didn’t have any comment on that at all.Racial reconciliation has been a prominent issue in the Episcopal Church in recent years as it faces its own historical complicity with slavery and racism. Do you see Saint Augustine’s playing a role in the church’s reconciliation efforts?Oh, yes, we are as a university in full support of the presiding bishop’s priority around racial reconciliation and the Jesus Movement. And we are amenable in a way that Saint Augustine’s University can be a part of serving as a catalyst or platform where dialog can take place and intellectual exchange can happen to advance stronger race relations in the nation. We are in full support of that, and I commend the church for its efforts to have an open dialog about the future.Saint Augustine’s is turning 150 years old. Any thoughts on what the university will look like in another 150 years?Another 150 years, we see a very active academic and intellectual community with innovative programs. You know, everything is moving to distance learning now. We see expanding, of course, distance learning and adding graduate programs. We certainly see an expansion on our original founding with regard to religious studies, making sure that we continue to introduce young scholars who are interested in the Episcopal Church to prepare themselves here and then move on to seminary. And Saint Augustine’s is currently in a food desert, so building on the legacy of St. Agnes Hospital we see ourselves as a health catalyst to provide training and opportunities around health disparities and issues regarding health as well.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] This interview was lightly edited for clarity and condensed. Comments (1) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By David PaulsenPosted Mar 22, 2017 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Saint Augustine’s president, with deep ties to university’s past, looks to future Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Alma Simmons says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York People, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Alabama judge orders mediation in Sauls’ lawsuit

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Alabama judge orders mediation in Sauls’ lawsuit By ENS staffPosted Jun 15, 2017 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal News Service] An Alabama judge has ordered the corporation of the Episcopal Church, called the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS), and former Chief Operating Officer Bishop Stacy Sauls to engage in state-mandated mediation.Mobile County 13th Judicial District Judge Ben Brooks’ June 12 order came after he had heard oral arguments on the Church’s request that he dismiss a lawsuit Sauls filed after he was let go from his post. Brooks told the parties to submit proposed orders on the dismissal motion by July 14.The suit against the DFMS and an unspecified number of unnamed defendants associated with the Church claims that Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s decision to replace him as chief operating officer had damaged his reputation and has made it difficult, if not impossible, for him to be employed elsewhere in the Church. The Church had argued that the case did not belong in the Alabama courts but, instead, in New York where Sauls was based as COO.Brooks also said in his order that the parties in the lawsuit must submit to the sort of mediation that Alabama requires in civil lawsuits. Brooks appointed Michael Upchurch, an Alabama lawyer and mediator, to lead that process. Upchurch must finish the mediation and report to Brooks by Aug. 18.Upchurch attends St. James Episcopal Church in Fairhope, Alabama, according to his profile on the website of the Mobile law firm Frazer, Greene, Upchurch, and Baker.Sauls filed suit in early February, nearly a year after Curry relieved him of his job. In announcing the lawsuit, the presiding bishop said that, in consultation with legal counsel, he had “tried his best to negotiate a severance with Bishop Sauls.” Curry said he made “a good faith and compassionate offer, but that offer was not accepted.‘The presiding bishop also said that “as a steward of church resources” he could not go beyond that offer and explain it in good conscience to the Church.The presiding bishop had announced April 4, 2016, that Sam McDonald, deputy chief operating officer and director of mission, and Alex Baumgarten, director of public engagement and mission communications, were terminated after an investigation found they “violated established workplace policies and have failed to live up to the church’s standards of personal conduct in their relationships with employees, which contributed to a workplace environment often inconsistent with the values and expectations of the Episcopal Church.”At that time, Curry said Sauls would not continue as chief operating officer even though he had “operated within the scope of his office,” did not violate workplace policy and was unaware of the policy violations by McDonald and Baumgarten (both of whom reported to him). The three senior managers had been on administrative leave since Dec. 9, 2015, pending an investigation into formal complaints and allegations from multiple members of the presiding bishop’s staff that the three had violated personnel policies. Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

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